recompense

verb
rec·​om·​pense | \ˈre-kəm-ˌpen(t)s \
recompensed; recompensing

Definition of recompense 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to give something to by way of compensation (as for a service rendered or damage incurred)

b : to pay for

2 : to return in kind : requite

recompense

noun

Definition of recompense (Entry 2 of 2)

: an equivalent or a return for something done, suffered, or given : compensation offered in recompense for injuries

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Choose the Right Synonym for recompense

Verb

pay, compensate, remunerate, satisfy, reimburse, indemnify, repay, recompense mean to give money or its equivalent in return for something. pay implies the discharge of an obligation incurred. paid their bills compensate implies a making up for services rendered. an attorney well compensated for her services remunerate clearly suggests paying for services rendered and may extend to payment that is generous or not contracted for. promised to remunerate the searchers handsomely satisfy implies paying a person what is required by law. all creditors will be satisfied in full reimburse implies a return of money that has been spent for another's benefit. reimbursed employees for expenses indemnify implies making good a loss suffered through accident, disaster, warfare. indemnified the families of the dead miners repay stresses paying back an equivalent in kind or amount. repay a favor with a favor recompense suggests due return in amends, friendly repayment, or reward. passengers were recompensed for the delay

Examples of recompense in a Sentence

Verb

the cash-strapped museum can recompense lecturers with only token honorariums that company still needs to recompense the work that the contractor finished last month

Noun

He is asking for a just recompense for the work he's done. He received $10,000 in recompense for his injuries.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Though only Altuve was voted in as a starter, Hinch promised Bregman playing time as recompense for handling the manager's Sunday morning clubhouse joke with such ease. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, "5 Astros selected to AL All-Star team," 9 July 2018 Upon emancipation in 1865, at the end of the civil war, some of the slaves who have been pressed into the Meaher family’s service ask for land in recompense for their bondage. The Economist, "The story of one of the last slaves imported to America," 10 May 2018 But the antipodes offer singular rewards in recompense. Ryu Spaeth, The New Republic, "Gerald Murnane’s Endless Island," 4 May 2018 Whether these descendants of slaves deserve recompense for the atrocities inflicted on their ancestors is one of the great unresolved questions of American society. Alexander Nazaryan, Newsweek, "New York City Would Really Rather Not Talk About Its Slavery-Loving Past," 15 Apr. 2015 Sharpton said Erica didn’t die of a heart attack but of a heart that was attacked, after seeing her father so brutally snuffed out with no recompense. Angela Helm, The Root, "Erica Garner’s Funeral Was Marred by a Family Dispute, but Her Unapologetic Warrior Spirit Could Not Be Diminished," 9 Jan. 2018 Allowing the residents of nations whose wealth our elites expropriated through imperial conquest — and/or predatory economic policies — is an act of selfless generosity, not of modest recompense. Eric Levitz, Daily Intelligencer, "Trump’s ‘Sh*thole Country’ Remarks Are Right-wing Political Correctness Run Amok," 12 Jan. 2018 Deripaska was seeking millions of dollars in recompense from Manafort and Gates as recently as August 2015, according to court records from the Cayman Islands, and at one point hired a private investigator to track the two men down. Andrew Roth, Washington Post, "Manafort’s Russia connection: What you need to know about Oleg Deripaska," 24 Sep. 2017 Plus, companies often require accusers to go through a quiet arbitration process rather than seeking public recompense in a court of law. Annie Lowrey, The Atlantic, "The Inequality Beneath the Sexual-Harassment Headlines," 26 Oct. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recompense.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recompense

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recompense

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French recompenser, from Late Latin recompensare, from Latin re- + compensare to compensate

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Time Traveler for recompense

The first known use of recompense was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for recompense

recompense

verb

English Language Learners Definition of recompense

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to give something (such as money) to (someone) as a reward or as a payment for loss or suffering

recompense

noun

English Language Learners Definition of recompense (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is given to or done to thank or reward someone or to pay someone for loss or suffering

recompense

verb
rec·​om·​pense | \ˈre-kəm-ˌpens \
recompensed; recompensing

Kids Definition of recompense

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay for or pay back He was recompensed for his loss.

recompense

noun

Kids Definition of recompense (Entry 2 of 2)

: something given in return for damage or suffering

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