recompense

verb
rec·​om·​pense | \ ˈre-kəm-ˌpen(t)s How to pronounce recompense (audio) \
recompensed; recompensing

Definition of recompense

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to give something to by way of compensation (as for a service rendered or damage incurred)
b : to pay for
2 : to return in kind : requite

recompense

noun

Definition of recompense (Entry 2 of 2)

: an equivalent or a return for something done, suffered, or given : compensation offered in recompense for injuries

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Verb

pay, compensate, remunerate, satisfy, reimburse, indemnify, repay, recompense mean to give money or its equivalent in return for something. pay implies the discharge of an obligation incurred. paid their bills compensate implies a making up for services rendered. an attorney well compensated for her services remunerate clearly suggests paying for services rendered and may extend to payment that is generous or not contracted for. promised to remunerate the searchers handsomely satisfy implies paying a person what is required by law. all creditors will be satisfied in full reimburse implies a return of money that has been spent for another's benefit. reimbursed employees for expenses indemnify implies making good a loss suffered through accident, disaster, warfare. indemnified the families of the dead miners repay stresses paying back an equivalent in kind or amount. repay a favor with a favor recompense suggests due return in amends, friendly repayment, or reward. passengers were recompensed for the delay

Examples of recompense in a Sentence

Verb the cash-strapped museum can recompense lecturers with only token honorariums that company still needs to recompense the work that the contractor finished last month Noun He is asking for a just recompense for the work he's done. He received $10,000 in recompense for his injuries.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That date is when the Biden administration's requirement that private insurance companies recompense those who buy over-the-counter COVID tests goes into effect. Kathryn Watson, CBS News, 10 Jan. 2022 In a professional setting, a favorable recommendation for a job well done — while certainly appreciated — should not be recompensed with a present. Judith Martin, Washington Post, 23 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Harris, who preserves Asheville’s stories, histories, and legends, looks to the younger generation for how best to utilize this long overdue recompense. Melanie Canales, Wired, 29 Nov. 2021 Family members perceived the ceremony as a form of recompense for the mistreatment of the families. James Gordon Meek, ABC News, 11 Nov. 2021 Under the plan, each black person who can trace his ancestry to slaves would be eligible to receive $280,000 in recompense, with families receiving $850,000. Charles Hilu, National Review, 9 Sep. 2021 There was some deserved acknowledgment of the herculean efforts of healthcare workers in the face of instability and fear, but other working-class people who fought for acknowledgment and recompense were left in the margins. Shamira Ibrahim, Essence, 6 Sep. 2021 Reparations — recompense for the cumulative effects of white supremacy — are direct payments from the federal government to American descendants of U. S. slavery calibrated to eliminate the gulf in black-white wealth, now estimated at $11 trillion. William Darity, Rolling Stone, 19 June 2021 Established in 1944, the awards were repeatedly censured by the FCC and kicked off the air twice for effectively giving awards out as recompense for favors. Chris Lee, Vulture, 14 May 2021 The United States used some of the islands as a testing site for nuclear weapons while the country was a territory, and the compact granting free travel is in part recompense for the harm done by those tests. Tess Vrbin, Arkansas Online, 25 Apr. 2021 Then much of this recompense can fairly be viewed as overdue, regardless of how trends may now benefit a new class of rappers. Shamira Ibrahim, Vulture, 20 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recompense.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recompense

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recompense

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French recompenser, from Late Latin recompensare, from Latin re- + compensare to compensate

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Time Traveler for recompense

Time Traveler

The first known use of recompense was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near recompense

recompensation

recompense

recompenser

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Statistics for recompense

Last Updated

19 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Recompense.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recompense. Accessed 24 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for recompense

recompense

verb

English Language Learners Definition of recompense

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to give something (such as money) to (someone) as a reward or as a payment for loss or suffering

recompense

noun

English Language Learners Definition of recompense (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is given to or done to thank or reward someone or to pay someone for loss or suffering

recompense

verb
rec·​om·​pense | \ ˈre-kəm-ˌpens How to pronounce recompense (audio) \
recompensed; recompensing

Kids Definition of recompense

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay for or pay back He was recompensed for his loss.

recompense

noun

Kids Definition of recompense (Entry 2 of 2)

: something given in return for damage or suffering

More from Merriam-Webster on recompense

Nglish: Translation of recompense for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of recompense for Arabic Speakers

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