surrender

verb
sur·ren·der | \ sə-ˈren-dər \
surrendered; surrendering\sə-ˈren-d(ə-)riŋ \

Definition of surrender 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to yield to the power, control, or possession of another upon compulsion or demand surrendered the fort

b : to give up completely or agree to forgo especially in favor of another

2a : to give (oneself) up into the power of another especially as a prisoner

b : to give (oneself) over to something (such as an influence)

intransitive verb

: to give oneself up into the power of another : yield

surrender

noun

Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the action of yielding one's person or giving up the possession of something especially into the power of another

b : the relinquishment by a patentee of rights or claims under a patent

c : the delivery of a principal into lawful custody by bail

called also surrender by bail

d : the voluntary cancellation of the legal liability of an insurance company by the insured and beneficiary for a consideration

e : the delivery of a fugitive from justice by one government to another

2 : an instance of surrendering

Keep scrolling for more

Synonyms & Antonyms for surrender

Synonyms: Verb

bow, cave (in), give in, submit, succumb, yield

Synonyms: Noun

capitulating, capitulation, cession, handover, relinquishment, rendition, submission, submitting

Antonyms: Verb

hold off, resist

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for surrender

Verb

relinquish, yield, resign, surrender, abandon, waive mean to give up completely. relinquish usually does not imply strong feeling but may suggest some regret, reluctance, or weakness. relinquished her crown yield implies concession or compliance or submission to force. the troops yielded ground grudgingly resign emphasizes voluntary relinquishment or sacrifice without struggle. resigned her position surrender implies a giving up after a struggle to retain or resist. surrendered their claims abandon stresses finality and completeness in giving up. abandoned all hope waive implies conceding or forgoing with little or no compulsion. waived the right to a trial by jury

Examples of surrender in a Sentence

Verb

The enemy finally surrendered after three days of fighting. The gunman surrendered and was taken into custody. The troops were forced to surrender the fort. They were required to surrender their passports. the surrendering of land to the government He refused to surrender to despair. He refused to surrender himself to despair.

Noun

Their surrender was formalized in a treaty. They demanded an unconditional surrender.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

One stat from 2017: 27 sacks surrendered, tied for the seventh fewest in the NFL. Edward Lee, baltimoresun.com, "Ravens 2018 position-by-position breakdown: offensive line," 13 July 2018 Santiago surrendered to law enforcement immediately and admitted shooting the victims, according to the FBI. Tonya Alanez, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Deputies were at a party when Fort Lauderdale airport shooting began, says widow's lawsuit," 12 July 2018 Gifford surrendered to authorities a few days later. Andres Picon, BostonGlobe.com, "N.H. man accused of breaking into apartment, leaving child pornography behind," 6 July 2018 The 2013 team surrendered a league-low 172 passing yards per game — a ridiculous figure in this period of prodigious passing offense — while picking off 28 passes (and allowing just 16 TDs). Nate Davis, USA TODAY, "As Seahawks' Legion of Boom disbands, is it time to anoint it NFL's greatest secondary?," 3 July 2018 Weinstein, 66, surrendered to police in May, and he was marched in handcuffs past a throng of reporters outside the New York Police Department’s 1st Precinct. Richard Winton, latimes.com, "Harvey Weinstein is indicted again. The new charges could bring a life sentence," 2 July 2018 Kingsland Police Officer Zechariah Presley surrendered Wednesday to the Camden County Sheriff’s Office after the Georgia Bureau of Investigation obtained warrants for his arrest. NBC News, "Georgia officer who shot fleeing black man charged with voluntary manslaughter," 28 June 2018 And what does that bloody arm symbol mean to him now, in the era where Donald Trump is president and the law has surrendered to his will? Adam Fisher, WIRED, "A Landmark Legal Shift Opens Pandora’s Box for DIY Guns," 10 July 2018 The picnic was for Juneteenth, which commemorates the emancipation of slaves in Texas on June 19, 1865 — two months after the Confederate army surrendered, ending the Civil War, and three years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Otis R. Taylor Jr., SFChronicle.com, "Oakland city politics: Running against Desley Brooks? You may run a risk," 22 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The ‘bark orders, impose punishments, and bully friends and enemies into surrender to the mighty, imperial me’ approach to foreign policy is unlikely enough to work even when applied to relatively weak states like North Korea and Iran. James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: Trump’s go-it-alone approach to foreign policy angers allies, benefits adversaries," 25 May 2018 Rathika held out for two weeks before surrendering to the Tigers, only months before their own surrender in the spring of 2009. Longreads, "A Chance to Rewrite History: The Women Fighters of the Tamil Tigers," 22 May 2018 Officers made contact with the suspect, who was armed with a handgun and attempted to negotiate his peaceful surrender. Mark Price, charlotteobserver, "NC police shoot man holding Harris Teeter staff hostage during standoff," 13 July 2018 On the screen, numbers indicate key images, and tapping on one will summon information that explains what the image represents and provides an eyewitness account of the surrender. Alice George, Smithsonian, "The American Revolution Was Just One Battlefront in a Huge World War," 28 June 2018 The Japanese signed terms of surrender on the ship’s deck on Sept. 2, 1945, ending World War II. Scott Harrison, latimes.com, "From the Archives: The battleship Missouri returns to Long Beach," 25 May 2018 The very public nature of his surrender, from using the main entrance to the timing, suggests prosecutors are trying to send a message. CBS News, "Harvey Weinstein has turned himself in. What's next?," 25 May 2018 However, many observers outside the investigation are unsatisfied with this declaration of surrender. Jeff Wise, Popular Mechanics, "What If They Were Looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the Wrong Place All Along?," 8 June 2018 When James has the hot hand, the opponents' only recourse is signing the articles of surrender. Bill Livingston, cleveland.com, "Cleveland Cavaliers 2018: On LeBron James' fadeaway, Boston Celtics' resurgence -- Bill Livingston," 12 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'surrender.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of surrender

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for surrender

Verb

Middle English surrendren, from surrendre, noun

Noun

Middle English surrendre, from Anglo-French, from surrendre, susrendre to relinquish, from sur- & sus-, suz under + rendre to give back — more at render, sous

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about surrender

Statistics for surrender

Last Updated

9 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for surrender

The first known use of surrender was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for surrender

surrender

verb

English Language Learners Definition of surrender

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to agree to stop fighting, hiding, resisting, etc., because you know that you will not win or succeed

: to give the control or use of (something) to someone else

: to allow something (such as a habit or desire) to influence or control you

surrender

noun

English Language Learners Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

: an agreement to stop fighting, hiding, resisting, etc., because you know that you will not win or succeed : an act of surrendering

: the act of giving the control or use of something to someone else

: the act of allowing yourself to be influenced or controlled by someone or something

surrender

verb
sur·ren·der | \ sə-ˈren-dər \
surrendered; surrendering

Kids Definition of surrender

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to give up after a struggle The soldiers surrendered. We'll never surrender the fort.

2 : to let go of : relinquish We surrendered our place in line.

surrender

noun

Kids Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of giving up after a struggle

2 : the act of giving something over to the possession or control of someone else

surrender

transitive verb
sur·ren·der

Legal Definition of surrender 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : to yield to the control or possession of another surrender the leased premises surrender collateral to a creditor

b : to give up completely or agree to forgo

c : to cancel (one's insurance policy) voluntarily

2 : to give over to the custody of the law surrender a defendant

intransitive verb

: to give oneself up

surrender

noun

Legal Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of surrendering discharge an obligor by surrender of a promissory note especially : the yielding of an estate by a tenant to the landlord so that the leasehold interest is extinguished by mutual agreement

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on surrender

What made you want to look up surrender? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a magnificent or impressive array

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Food Quiz

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!