surrender

verb
sur·​ren·​der | \ sə-ˈren-dər How to pronounce surrender (audio) \
surrendered; surrendering\ sə-​ˈren-​d(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce surrender (audio) \

Definition of surrender

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to yield to the power, control, or possession of another upon compulsion or demand surrendered the fort
b : to give up completely or agree to forgo especially in favor of another
2a : to give (oneself) up into the power of another especially as a prisoner
b : to give (oneself) over to something (such as an influence)

intransitive verb

: to give oneself up into the power of another : yield

surrender

noun

Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the action of yielding one's person or giving up the possession of something especially into the power of another
b : the relinquishment by a patentee of rights or claims under a patent
c : the delivery of a principal into lawful custody by bail

called also surrender by bail

d : the voluntary cancellation of the legal liability of an insurance company by the insured and beneficiary for a consideration
e : the delivery of a fugitive from justice by one government to another
2 : an instance of surrendering

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Choose the Right Synonym for surrender

Verb

relinquish, yield, resign, surrender, abandon, waive mean to give up completely. relinquish usually does not imply strong feeling but may suggest some regret, reluctance, or weakness. relinquished her crown yield implies concession or compliance or submission to force. the troops yielded ground grudgingly resign emphasizes voluntary relinquishment or sacrifice without struggle. resigned her position surrender implies a giving up after a struggle to retain or resist. surrendered their claims abandon stresses finality and completeness in giving up. abandoned all hope waive implies conceding or forgoing with little or no compulsion. waived the right to a trial by jury

Examples of surrender in a Sentence

Verb The enemy finally surrendered after three days of fighting. The gunman surrendered and was taken into custody. The troops were forced to surrender the fort. They were required to surrender their passports. the surrendering of land to the government He refused to surrender to despair. He refused to surrender himself to despair. Noun Their surrender was formalized in a treaty. They demanded an unconditional surrender.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The right-hander gave them a season-high 5-1/3 against the Miami Marlins and didn’t surrender a run, but the Dodgers were forced to used six relievers anyway because their offense went silent. Los Angeles Times, 7 July 2021 The senior right-hander walked a batter and hit one in the ninth, but did not surrender a hit. Creg Stephenson | Cstephenson@al.com, al, 13 Mar. 2021 The score tied twice, but the Green Wave did not surrender the lead to take a 15-13 advantage at the first buzzer. News Services, NOLA.com, 22 Dec. 2020 Kentucky’s offensive line paved the way for 308 rushing yards and did not surrender a sack. Jon Hale, The Courier-Journal, 14 Nov. 2020 This domino effect of falling districts has only served to demoralize the Afghan security forces, who have watched their comrades surrender en masse, forfeiting their vehicles and equipment to an increasingly triumphant Taliban. BostonGlobe.com, 29 June 2021 Instead, today, how many would be willing to surrender a fully operational Christian charity for a statement about LGBT politics? Kathryn Jean Lopez, National Review, 28 June 2021 California law allows parents or guardians to surrender a newborn at hospitals and fire stations without legal repercussions. Andrea Castillo Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 26 June 2021 As security approached, the unruly fan seemingly pretended to surrender before taking off and running away from two officers. Vanessa Etienne, PEOPLE.com, 21 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun One song melded into the next, rising and falling and rising again into extended, mantralike choruses about surrender while people in the congregation began kneeling and bowing. Stephanie Mccrummen, Anchorage Daily News, 12 July 2021 One song melded into the next, rising and falling and rising again into extended, mantralike choruses about surrender while people in the congregation began kneeling and bowing. Washington Post, 11 July 2021 His balloon battalion returned to the United States in November 1944, six months before Germany’s surrender, and trained in Hawaii for deployment to the Pacific. New York Times, 11 July 2021 Amnesty International South Africa also praised Zuma's surrender and imprisonment. Mogomotsi Magome And Andrew Meldrum, Star Tribune, 8 July 2021 In Sullivan’s simulation, Taiwan’s surrender ultimately is a political decision that runs counter to the strictly military dynamics on the ground around the capital. David Axe, Forbes, 6 July 2021 Acknowledging that joining a cult requires an element of voluntary self-surrender also obliges us to consider whether the very relinquishment of control isn’t a significant part of the appeal. Zoë Heller, The New Yorker, 5 July 2021 The DeSoto Police Department is giving residents the opportunity to give guns to law enforcement during its annual gun surrender program on July 31. Tyler Carter, Dallas News, 1 July 2021 Artis in particular has an interesting story, emerging from slavery in Virginia to joining Union troops and witnessing Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Bill Glauber, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 30 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'surrender.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of surrender

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for surrender

Verb

Middle English surrendren, from surrendre, noun

Noun

Middle English surrendre, from Anglo-French, from surrendre, susrendre to relinquish, from sur- & sus-, suz under + rendre to give back — more at render, sous-chef

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Learn More About surrender

Time Traveler for surrender

Time Traveler

The first known use of surrender was in the 15th century

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Statistics for surrender

Last Updated

13 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Surrender.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/surrender. Accessed 24 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for surrender

surrender

verb

English Language Learners Definition of surrender

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to agree to stop fighting, hiding, resisting, etc., because you know that you will not win or succeed
: to give the control or use of (something) to someone else
: to allow something (such as a habit or desire) to influence or control you

surrender

noun

English Language Learners Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

: an agreement to stop fighting, hiding, resisting, etc., because you know that you will not win or succeed : an act of surrendering
: the act of giving the control or use of something to someone else
: the act of allowing yourself to be influenced or controlled by someone or something

surrender

verb
sur·​ren·​der | \ sə-ˈren-dər How to pronounce surrender (audio) \
surrendered; surrendering

Kids Definition of surrender

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to give up after a struggle The soldiers surrendered. We'll never surrender the fort.
2 : to let go of : relinquish We surrendered our place in line.

surrender

noun

Kids Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of giving up after a struggle
2 : the act of giving something over to the possession or control of someone else

surrender

transitive verb
sur·​ren·​der

Legal Definition of surrender

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : to yield to the control or possession of another surrender the leased premises surrender collateral to a creditor
b : to give up completely or agree to forgo
c : to cancel (one's insurance policy) voluntarily
2 : to give over to the custody of the law surrender a defendant

intransitive verb

: to give oneself up

surrender

noun

Legal Definition of surrender (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of surrendering discharge an obligor by surrender of a promissory note especially : the yielding of an estate by a tenant to the landlord so that the leasehold interest is extinguished by mutual agreement

More from Merriam-Webster on surrender

Nglish: Translation of surrender for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of surrender for Arabic Speakers

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