resign

verb (1)
re·​sign | \ ri-ˈzīn How to pronounce resign (audio) \
resigned; resigning; resigns

Definition of resign

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : relegate, consign especially : to give (oneself) over without resistance resigned herself to her fate
2 : to give up deliberately especially : to renounce (something, such as a right or position) by a formal act

intransitive verb

1 : to give up one's office or position : quit
2 : to accept something as inevitable : submit

re-sign

verb (2)
\ (ˌ)rē-ˈsīn How to pronounce re-sign (audio) \
re-signed; re-signing; re-signs

Definition of re-sign (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to sign again especially : to rehire (someone, such as an athlete) by means of a signed contract

intransitive verb

: to sign up again

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Other Words from resign

Verb (1)

resignedness \ ri-​ˈzī-​nəd-​nəs How to pronounce re-sign (audio) \ noun
resigner \ ri-​ˈzī-​nər How to pronounce re-sign (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for resign

Verb (1)

relinquish, yield, resign, surrender, abandon, waive mean to give up completely. relinquish usually does not imply strong feeling but may suggest some regret, reluctance, or weakness. relinquished her crown yield implies concession or compliance or submission to force. the troops yielded ground grudgingly resign emphasizes voluntary relinquishment or sacrifice without struggle. resigned her position surrender implies a giving up after a struggle to retain or resist. surrendered their claims abandon stresses finality and completeness in giving up. abandoned all hope waive implies conceding or forgoing with little or no compulsion. waived the right to a trial by jury

abdicate, renounce, resign mean to give up a position with no possibility of resuming it. abdicate implies a giving up of sovereign power or sometimes an evading of responsibility such as that of a parent. abdicated the throne renounce may replace it but often implies additionally a sacrifice for a greater end. renounced her inheritance by marrying a commoner resign applies to the giving up of an unexpired office or trust. resigned from the board

Is it quit or resign?

Should you quit or should you resign from your job? No matter which one you choose, it is likely that both of these actions will have the exact same effect on your future, as they are, in this sense, fairly synonymous. However, each is more likely to be found used in specific settings, so you may wish to choose your word with care. Resign is more formal, and will often be found when a person is describing relinquishing a position or office, especially if it is done in disgrace. While it would not be incorrect to say that a member of an organization's board, a king or queen, or a political leader "quit their position," it is more likely that the word resign would be employed.

Examples of resign in a Sentence

Verb (1) The senator was forced to resign his position. The newspaper's editor resigned after the scandal. He resigned from his job as principal of the school.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Taken together, the stances of Congress' two top Republicans — neither of whom has said publicly that Trump should resign or be impeached — reflected the politically fraught and fast-moving nature of the crisis the party faces. Jonathan Martin, Star Tribune, "McConnell privately backs impeachment as House moves to charge Trump," 13 Jan. 2021 Some politicians have said that Frederiksen too should resign. Washington Post, "Danish government may exhume hundreds of thousands of dead minks and burn them," 27 Nov. 2020 Brown, who suggested that Hawley and Cruz should resign in the wake of the violence, has also criticized Trump for inciting the violence. Sabrina Eaton, cleveland, "Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio files ethics complaint against Republican Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley," 21 Jan. 2021 There is speculation in the Netherlands that Rutte's government could resign Friday, taking political responsibility for the scandal. Mike Corder, Star Tribune, "Dutch Labor Party leader steps down over welfare scandal," 14 Jan. 2021 House Freedom Caucus Chairman Andy Biggs, an Arizona Republican, told the Washington Examiner on Tuesday night that Cheney should resign from her role as Republican conference chairwoman. Zachary Halaschak, Washington Examiner, "'A principled leader': Dan Crenshaw defends Liz Cheney after her vote to impeach Trump," 13 Jan. 2021 Taken together, the stances of Congress’s two top Republicans — neither of whom has said publicly that Mr. Trump should resign or be impeached — reflected the politically fraught and fast-moving nature of the crisis the party faces. New York Times, "McConnell Privately Backs Impeachment as House Moves to Charge Trump," 12 Jan. 2021 Two Republican senators now say President Donald Trump should resign in the wake of deadly riots at the Capitol and support for the House drive to impeach him a second time is gaining momentum. Anchorage Daily News, "GOP senators urge Trump to resign; impeachment gains support," 10 Jan. 2021 Charles Walker, a lawmaker from Johnson’s Conservative party, told the Sunday Telegraph newspaper that Hancock should resign. Kitty Donaldson, Bloomberg.com, "U.K.’s Hancock Says New Covid Mutation Is ‘Out of Control’," 20 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'resign.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of resign

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Verb (2)

1805, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for resign

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Anglo-French resigner, from Latin resignare, literally, to unseal, cancel, from re- + signare to sign, seal — more at sign

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Time Traveler for resign

Time Traveler

The first known use of resign was in the 14th century

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Statistics for resign

Last Updated

22 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Resign.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/resign. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for resign

resign

verb

English Language Learners Definition of resign

: to give up (a job or position) in a formal or official way

resign

verb
re·​sign | \ ri-ˈzīn How to pronounce resign (audio) \
resigned; resigning

Kids Definition of resign

1 : to give up (a job or position) by a formal or official act
2 : to prepare to accept something unpleasant Unable to sleep, I resigned myself to await his return …— Mildred D. Taylor, Roll of Thunder

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Comments on resign

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