institute

noun
in·​sti·​tute | \ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt, -ˌtyüt\

Definition of institute 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as

a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind

b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields

c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute

d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative

(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize

b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation

2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ˈin(t)-​stə-​ˌtü-​tər, -​ˌtyü-​ \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun

They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Verb

By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In some ways, the Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics simply gives a name — and $1.2 million — to an institute that already exists. Eric Boodman, STAT, "First phage therapy center in the U.S. signals growing acceptance," 21 June 2018 Their research interests range from how to combat antibiotic resistance (Bernhardt) to cancer-causing mutations in blood cells that also predispose people to heart disease (Ebert), according to the institute. BostonGlobe.com, "The week in business," 25 May 2018 That would increase 43 percent, to $19.4 billion in 2100 with sea level rise, according to the institute. Alex Stuckey, Houston Chronicle, "Sea level rise would drastically increase damage from hurricanes around Galveston Bay, study finds," 3 May 2018 Those in the top 1 percent, with incomes above $427,000, would get $7,086, according to the institute. Grace Schneider, The Courier-Journal, "What the recent tax reform bills mean for the average Kentuckian," 19 Apr. 2018 Refugees settle mainly in North Akron, in close proximity to the institute. Jennifer Conn, Akron Reporter, cleveland.com, "Shanti Community Farms offers Akron refugees space to farm and a sense of purpose (photos)," 12 Apr. 2018 Auditions are required to be accepted to the institute. Sheryl Devore, Lake County News-Sun, "World-class violinist, young musicians perform string quintet at Ravinia," 2 Apr. 2018 The assessment was based on a variety of evidence that not only implicated the institute, which in Russian is abbreviated as CNIIHM, but also a specific professor who works there. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Russia was likely behind dangerous critical infrastructure attack, report says," 24 Oct. 2018 Providing that know-how is the goal of the new institute, called EarthLab. Katherine Long, The Seattle Times, "Former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell will guide UW’s new climate initiative," 18 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In the next Congress, lawmakers likely will focus on the process of instituting a new law regarding private care for veterans and a handful of other measures passed in the first two years of the Trump administration. WSJ, "Meet the New Agenda Setters in the House," 7 Nov. 2018 This is the way things normally work when families are apprehended together; by instituting it now, the government is essentially wiping away the legal side effects of family separation. Dara Lind, Vox, "As many as 1,000 parents separated from their children are getting a second chance to stay in the US," 13 Sep. 2018 The first two versions were struck down by federal courts, which argued that the president's statements about instituting a Muslim ban violated federal law and due process protections enshrined in the Constitution. Alan Gomez, USA TODAY, "As hundreds of thousands prepare to rally, here's where things stand on immigration," 29 June 2018 Wells Fargo, jealously guarding its mail-delivery fees, tried to block the postmaster general from instituting free rural delivery in the late 1800s. Jeremy C. Young, Houston Chronicle, "Why a boycott of Facebook is a bad idea," 1 Apr. 2018 Businesses should also take the lead in instituting ethical sourcing and labor recruitment requirements. Becky Allen, Fortune, "Commentary: There Are Still 40 Million Slaves Worldwide. How Can We Free Them?," 1 Feb. 2018 This is because the country's economic growth offsets any emissions controls the government instituted. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "In China, replacing coal and biomass stoves has saved lives," 21 Nov. 2018 At this point, the change in Discovery is the only element of the mayor’s broader diversity vision being instituted and so subject to litigation. Leslie Brody, WSJ, "Parents to Sue City Over Elite High-School Admissions," 13 Nov. 2018 Maxwell adds that Everytown has helped pass 28 laws in the past five years preventing domestic abusers from obtaining guns, and instituted background checks in 20 states that previously had loopholes. Judith Ohikuare, Seventeen, "Activism Fatigue Is Real And Here's How You Can Fight Against It," 17 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

15 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for institute

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for institute

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

noun

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb
in·​sti·​tute | \ˈin-stə-ˌtüt, -ˌtyüt\
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.

2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research

2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir

2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative

2  plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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Comments on institute

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