institute

noun
in·sti·tute | \ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt, -ˌtyüt\

Definition of institute 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as

a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind

b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields

c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute

d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative

(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize

b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation

2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtü-tər, -ˌtyü- \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun

They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Verb

By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The institute has an active board but no longer has any staff other than Dr. Brown, who gives speeches about the importance of play and helps teach a class at Stanford on how play leads to innovation. Clare Ansberry, WSJ, "An Overlooked Skill in Aging: How to Have Fun," 2 June 2018 Under the restructuring, the institute will no longer have an executive director, Lewis said. Susan Snyder, Philly.com, "Penn's changes to Fels Institute worry alumni," 23 May 2018 The institute has partnered with the Birmingham FBI office for a conference on civil rights and law enforcement for more than a decade. Anna Beahm, AL.com, "Birmingham Civil Rights Institute awarded 2017 FBI Director's Community Leadership Award," 9 Apr. 2018 The institute has an advisory council of outside experts who meet three times a year to make recommendations about research and policy. Sharon Begley, STAT, "New alcohol-advertising research stopped with NIH branch director’s arrival," 4 Apr. 2018 Cohn's version of history is Parks lived in a house at 9336 Wildemere St., which is still standing, and the institute has offices there. Frank Witsil, Detroit Free Press, "Will house tied to Rosa Parks find its way back to Detroit?," 21 Mar. 2018 The institute has historically focused child development and education through a combination of research, programming and clinical services. Jacob Carpenter, Houston Chronicle, "Q&A: How would major changes work at 14 Houston ISD schools?," 7 Feb. 2018 Steve Wamhoff, director of federal tax policy at the institute and one of the report’s authors, told me. Emily Stewart, Vox, "America’s getting $10 trillion in tax cuts, and 20% of them are going the richest 1%," 11 July 2018 The plan is part of a sweeping bill that will also raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour and institute a yearly sales tax holiday. Shirley Leung, BostonGlobe.com, "How progressives and businesses made an unlikely deal on family leave," 28 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The 2015 Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act - or PATH Act- instituted additional safeguards to prevent identity theft and fraud connected to the credits. Leada Gore, AL.com, "When can you expect your tax refund?," 30 Apr. 2018 On the Democratic side, Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo instituted the policy via an executive order just days after Parkland, and now the Legislature is moving to pass a bill to codify it into law. James Pindell, BostonGlobe.com, "Unlike many gun measures, ‘red flag’ laws are actually passing. It looks likes Mass. will be next," 24 May 2018 The larger challenge with pay parity comes well after its instituted, of course, when managers need to negotiate salaries for new hires. Jessi Hempel, WIRED, "The Rise And Fall of Uber HR Chief Liane Hornsey," 11 July 2018 Pruitt also instituted an EPA-wide policy in April that effectively prevents the agency from using research showing that pollution is bad for your health. Emily Atkin, The New Republic, "The new EPA chief has his first controversy.," 6 July 2018 In 2014 the commission instituted a state quota—11,749 pounds of eels, which was reduced to 9,688 pounds in 2015. National Geographic, "19 Eel Smugglers Sentenced, But Lucrative Trade Persists," 27 June 2018 After public outcry, President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order ending the policy the Justice Department had instituted in April that had separated parents and children at the border. Joseph De Avila, WSJ, "States Sue Trump Administration Over Immigrant Family Separation Policy," 26 June 2018 Hartford instituted an emergency curfew in 2008 after escalating violence, including 11 people shot in one weekend. Jesse Leavenworth, Courant Community, "Manchester Official Calls For Teen Curfew, Police Crack Down On Car Thieves," 21 June 2018 Even a bipartisan Assembly bill that would have instituted a three-tiered payment model, with rates of $55, $60 and $70 an hour depending on the type of case — went nowhere last year. Bruce Vielmetti, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Wisconsin Supreme Court moves to raise pay rate for some lawyers representing poor defendants," 18 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

20 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for institute

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for institute

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

noun

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb
in·sti·tute | \ˈin-stə-ˌtüt, -ˌtyüt\
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.

2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research

2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·sti·tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir

2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative

2  plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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Comments on institute

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