institute

noun
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt , -ˌtyüt\

Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as
a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind
b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields
c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute
d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize
b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation
2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ ˈin(t)-​stə-​ˌtü-​tər , -​ˌtyü-​ \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun

They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Verb

By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

According to the report authored by the institute, the upcoming collider will be over five times more powerful and over 20 miles in diameter. Avery Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "China Plans to Build a Particle Collider Five Times More Powerful Than the LHC," 14 Nov. 2018 And in December, Sinclair pushed back against a $13 million FCC fine for failing to disclose that what looked like news stories were actually sponsored commercials by a cancer institute. Alvin Chang, Vox, "Sinclair’s plan to take over local news just hit an unexpected roadblock: Trump’s FCC," 17 July 2018 An examination of the wolf's corpse by a Berlin wildlife research institute found that the young female had been fatally shot in the chest and then had a rope tied around her stomach and lashed to a concrete weight. Deutsche Welle, USA TODAY, "Wolf fatally shot, tied to weight and dumped in lake," 12 July 2018 The donation came from Alex Levi and his wife Vicki and was made in honor of the institute’s founding director, Ruth R. Faden. Meredith Cohn, baltimoresun.com, "Johns Hopkins University Berman Institute of Bioethics received $15 million gift," 12 July 2018 And Mr Lille, the shady French oil man, is the spitting image of Robert Pitman, the upstanding head of the institute’s work on transparent contracts. The Economist, "Fighting the resource curse through online gaming," 28 June 2018 Before killing the study, Collins invited the opinion of George Koob, the NIAAA director who took the reins of the institute in January 2014. Meredith Wadman, Science | AAAS, "NIH pulls the plug on controversial alcohol trial," 15 June 2018 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer,’’ a collaborative effort by the cancer institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Cancer Society and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Laurie Mcginley, BostonGlobe.com, "After long decline, death rates from prostate cancer stop falling," 22 May 2018 An independent review by a German research institute found that Guppyfriend caused textiles to shed 75 to 86 percent fewer fibers. Patrick Whittle, The Christian Science Monitor, "War on microfiber pollution starts in the laundry room," 8 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

New York state instituted the congestion fee as part of the budget process earlier this year. Paul Berger, WSJ, "Judge Stalls Congestion Fee on Manhattan Taxis," 20 Dec. 2018 And once again a wartime excess profits tax was instituted, ranging up to 95 percent. Robert J. Shiller, New York Times, "Once Cut, Corporate Income Taxes Are Hard to Restore," 22 June 2018 Trump signed the order Wednesday afternoon, halting the family-separation policy his administration instituted earlier this year. Julia Ainsley, NBC News, "Trump's order could detain families together indefinitely. But where will they stay?," 20 June 2018 That calculation includes tougher lending rules, instituted this year, that has reduced buyers’ purchasing power by almost 20 percent and cooled the market. Natalie Wong, Bloomberg.com, "Even New Yorkers Can’t Afford a Home in Toronto," 6 June 2018 The department instituted a permanent program later that year. Jane Ford-stewart, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "West Allis pilot program saving money by educating families so fewer ambulances go to non-emergency calls," 30 May 2018 Last year, the board instituted the Top Guest Chef Award, Hinckley said, to recognize outstanding commitment to the guest chef program. Joyce Rudolph, latimes.com, "On the Town: Guest chefs have secret recipe for helping homeless," 29 May 2018 The $5 increase, to be imposed at all national parks that charge entry fees, was instituted after the original proposal received harsh public criticism. Scott Craven, azcentral, "National park admission fees go up $5 on June 1," 12 Apr. 2018 The final change is one the academy immediately instituted last year: PwC partners are prohibited from using cellphones or social media during the show. Sandy Cohen, chicagotribune.com, "New rules govern handling of Oscar envelopes after 'La La Land' best picture flub," 22 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

10 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for institute

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for institute

institute

noun

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

verb
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin-stə-ˌtüt , -ˌtyüt\
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.
2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research
2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir
2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
2  plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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