institute

noun
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio) , -ˌtyüt \

Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as
a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind
b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields
c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute
d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize
b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation
2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ ˈin(t)-​stə-​ˌtü-​tər How to pronounce institutor (audio) , -​ˌtyü-​ \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Verb By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Madeleine Clare Elish, an anthropologist at Data & Society, a research institute, has studied accidents involving automation, and says moral blame for system failures often lands unfairly on humans who didn't create them. Tom Simonite, Wired, "As Machines Get Smarter, How Will We Relate to Them?," 19 May 2020 In the scientific community, Mikovits is known as a quack who was fired from a research institute and arrested for stealing equipment. TheWeek, "The coronavirus infodemic," 17 May 2020 But the actual death toll is likely to be much higher, according to death records compiled by Fiocruz, a government institute that studies health care trends. New York Times, "Brazil, Once a Leader, Struggles to Contain Virus Amid Political Turmoil," 16 May 2020 For now, the president should keep focusing on stopping the spread of the virus itself, said Joel Griffith, a research fellow at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative policy institute. Josh Wingrove, Bloomberg.com, "Trump Balks at Stimulus on Virus While Clamor to Act Gets Louder," 10 May 2020 Gluck, like other barbeque attendees, took issue with Gov. Ducey having a seat on the board of directors of TGen, a nonprofit genomics research institute. Katie Surma, azcentral, "Arizona protesters defy stay-at-home order, fueled by economic concern," 2 May 2020 Nancy Berlinger, a research scholar at The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute that in March released an ethical framework for health care institutions responding to COVID-19, tells Health. Patti Greco, Health.com, "If Coronavirus Patients Outnumber Ventilators, Who Gets One? Here's How Doctors Decide," 10 Apr. 2020 As part of the collaboration, AT&T is set to create a learning institute at the LeBron James Family Foundation’s I Promise Village by Graduate Hotels, the foundation announced Monday. Robin Goist, cleveland, "AT&T, LeBron James Family Foundation partner on learning center at I Promise School’s transitional housing in Akron," 2 Mar. 2020 Well-socialized wolves from a research institute in Indiana easily followed human pointing gestures, while some shelter dogs who’d had little contact with people did not. Popular Science, "Did humans truly domesticate dogs? Canine history is more of a mystery than you think.," 10 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In what promises to be the wackiest June amateur draft since Major League Baseball instituted it in 1965, truncated to five rounds instead of 40 in response to the coronavirus, the Giants will get seven picks. Henry Schulman, SFChronicle.com, "Giants enter odd 2020 draft with extra picks and the need to be master recruiters," 28 May 2020 Other accomplishments during the era included restoring integrity to government and instituting cost accounting measures to increase efficiency. Bill Glauber, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'America's Socialist Experiment': Locally produced TV documentary delves into Milwaukee's rich political past," 26 May 2020 In the meantime, the department has started instituting furloughs with its 9,000 employees. Nyamekye Daniel, Washington Examiner, "State auditor finds 'black hole' in North Carolina Department of Transportation's finances," 21 May 2020 Officials have instituted a process requiring witnesses to be be subject to the same screening required of prison employees before entering the facility, Texas Department of Criminal Justice spokesman Jeremy Desel said. CBS News, "Missouri carries out first execution since coronavirus outbreak began," 20 May 2020 Alternatively, hosts can monitor social distancing by instituting a 72-hour booking buffer in between stays. Ashlea Halpern, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Airbnb Could Change After the Pandemic—For the Better," 20 May 2020 McDonald and Spottswood concluded that population didn’t predict outcomes anywhere near as well as, for example, how quickly cities instituted public health measures like school closures and stay-at-home orders. Adam Rogers, Wired, "How Does a Virus Spread in Cities? It’s a Problem of Scale," 20 May 2020 Amid growing concerns about the reliability of some tests and false advertising of them, the agency ordered companies earlier this month to provide proof that their tests worked and instituted performance standards. Lauren Caruba, ExpressNews.com, "Coronavirus antibody tests have proliferated in San Antonio. Here’s the problem.," 17 May 2020 Flynn’s assertions raise questions about the efficacy of post-crisis reforms that Congress and the SEC instituted that sought to place new restrictions on banks and other lenders, increase transparency and protect consumers and investors. Heather Vogell, ProPublica, "Whistleblower: Wall Street Has Engaged in Widespread Manipulation of Mortgage Funds," 15 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Time Traveler for institute

Time Traveler

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

1 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Institute.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/institute. Accessed 3 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for institute

institute

noun
How to pronounce institute (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

verb
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio) , -ˌtyüt \
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.
2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research
2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir
2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
2 plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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Comments on institute

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