institute

1 of 2

noun

in·​sti·​tute ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio)
-ˌtyüt
: something that is instituted: such as
a
: an organization for the promotion of a cause : association
a research institute
an institute for the blind
b
: an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields
c
: a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field
an urban studies institute
d(1)
: an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
(2)
institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts
especially : a legal compendium

institute

2 of 2

verb

instituted; instituting

transitive verb

1
a
: to originate and get established : organize
b
: to set going : inaugurate
instituting an investigation
2
: to establish in a position or office
instituter noun
or institutor

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Verb By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Last year, the institute’s budget received a welcome bump, garnering more than €2 million ($2.2 million) in additional funding to support the local screen industries. Christopher Vourlias, Variety, 15 Feb. 2024 As part of a broader ongoing study of the links between genetics and the environment, Duffy and his team at the institute’s Milieu Intérieur Consortium studied 500 French men and 500 French women, all of whom donated blood and answered 44 pages of questions about their demographics and lifestyle. Celia Ford, WIRED, 14 Feb. 2024 One of the institute’s recent polls found that about 70 percent of Israelis want early elections. Shira Rubin, Washington Post, 8 Feb. 2024 Kelly will provide executive leadership and management of the institute, while Tabassi will lead the institute’s technical programs, according to the press release. Will Henshall, TIME, 7 Feb. 2024 But that concern has diminished, said Brett Abarbanel, the executive director of the international gaming institute at UNLV. Luke Burbank, CBS News, 4 Feb. 2024 The institute suggests creating a renter’s credit to alleviate some of the discrepancy. Angela Palermo, Idaho Statesman, 30 Jan. 2024 But the institute did not say precisely which studies would be retracted or corrected. Angus Chen and Jonathan Wosen, STAT, 22 Jan. 2024 The commitment to creating the institute outside the university is noteworthy for at least two reasons. Paula Stephan, STAT, 2 Feb. 2024
Verb
Now, without a deal, Aurinia is instituting austerity. Damian Garde, STAT, 15 Feb. 2024 Most types of robocalls have been prohibited since the agency instituted the Telephone Consumer Protection Act in 1991. IEEE Spectrum, 13 Feb. 2024 In another worrisome occurrence, a growing number of tech companies, some of them major players, have instituted not just two but three major rounds of job cuts since the current burst of tech staffing cutbacks began to emerge in early 2022. George Avalos, The Mercury News, 9 Feb. 2024 President Volodymyr Zelensky has appeared unwilling to take responsibility for instituting a major draft, instead asking his government and the army to come up with more arguments supporting this move. Thomas Gibbons-Neff, New York Times, 28 Jan. 2024 Meanwhile, Tesla instituted multiple price cuts, sparking worries about thinning margins. Esha Dey, Fortune, 26 Jan. 2024 Alaska has a system-wide travel waiver in place, which the airline first instituted after its mid-air blowout. Alison Fox, Travel + Leisure, 29 Jan. 2024 Minneapolis, which did not institute rent control, saw that number drop from nearly 5,000 total units in 2022 to around 1,400 last year. Frederick Melo, Twin Cities, 28 Jan. 2024 Faced with a $50 million budget shortfall next year, Sacramento City Manager Howard Chan has instituted freezes on hiring, travel and office supplies, via Theresa Clift. Andrew Sheeler, Sacramento Bee, 25 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'institute.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

First Known Use

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Time Traveler
The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near institute

Cite this Entry

“Institute.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/institute. Accessed 29 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

institute

1 of 2 verb
in·​sti·​tute ˈin(t)-stə-ˌt(y)üt How to pronounce institute (audio)
instituted; instituting
1
: to set up : establish
instituted a new policy
2
: to set going : begin
institute an investigation
instituter noun
or institutor

institute

2 of 2 noun
1
: a basic principle
2
a
: an organization for the support of a cause : association
an institute for scientific research
b
: a place for study usually in a special field
an art institute

Legal Definition

institute

1 of 2 transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting
1
: to establish in a particular position or office
specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir see also instituted heir at heir
2
: to get started : bring
institute a lawsuit

institute

2 of 2 noun
1
: an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
2
plural : a collection of principles
especially : a legal compendium

More from Merriam-Webster on institute

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