institute

noun
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio) , -ˌtyüt\

Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as
a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind
b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields
c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute
d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize
b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation
2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ ˈin(t)-​stə-​ˌtü-​tər How to pronounce institutor (audio) , -​ˌtyü-​ \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun

They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Verb

By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The institute, which has already built 300 tiny houses, has a goal of building 500 homes for those in need. Morgan Hines, USA TODAY, "Gannett Foundation supports local nonprofits with $6.5 million over last three years," 11 June 2019 The teenagers of Xavier’s institute, who were once shielded from the public through Xavier’s telepathy are now adults and have disbanded and gone their separate ways after the defeat of Magneto. Richard Newby, The Hollywood Reporter, "Who Can Play the X-Men Now?," 7 June 2019 The cost of the project is being fully covered by a family that has a long history with both the institute and the train: the Hamiltons. Peter Dobrin, https://www.inquirer.com, "Franklin Institute locomotive is going to perch overhead in a $6 million train room renovation," 4 June 2019 The influence of the NDI’s founder on the institute, Jacques d’Amboise, can hardly be overstated. Danielle Naer, Vogue, "The National Dance Institute Hosts Its 43rd Annual Gala," 16 Apr. 2019 The Pritzker Foundation has given $75 million to launch the new school, and gave $25 million previously to the institute and nanofabrication lab. Jake Holland, WSJ, "University of Chicago Launches School of Molecular Engineering," 28 May 2019 Founded in 2009, the institute is devoted to the teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas, the 13th Century Dominican friar associated with natural law, a moral philosophy that undergirds much of contemporary conservative legal thought. Jess Bravin, WSJ, "Justice Neil Gorsuch’s Speech to Catholic Group Closed to the Media," 18 Oct. 2018 The institute started under the auspices of the UW’s professional and continuing education program before becoming a nonprofit. Tom Keogh, The Seattle Times, "Seattle Piano Institute draws students from around the world for piano and life lessons," 3 July 2018 There’s some precedent for what the institute is trying to do. Bradley J. Fikes, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Seeking financial security, Scripps Research is taking its science directly to patients," 24 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The biggest change in the Atlantic Basin naming system was instituted in 1979 when alternating women’s and men’s names were introduced. al.com, "Why do we name hurricanes?," 4 June 2019 The Royal Victoria Order was first instituted by Queen Victoria in 1896 to reward personal services performed on her behalf. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "Kate Middleton's Insignia of the Dame Grand Cross May Debut In Public Soon," 23 May 2019 Advertising Since various reforms involving race-day medication and safety were instituted on March 15, The Stronach Group said there’d been more than 80,000 gallops during training with no fatalities. Stephen Whyno, The Seattle Times, "Santa Anita monitoring safety after latest fatality," 18 May 2019 The Gregorian calendar used today was instituted in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII to correct the old Julian system, which by that point had drifted out of season by 10 days. Kyle Peterson, WSJ, "An Astronomer’s View of the Christmas Sky," 21 Dec. 2018 The program was instituted by Israel's nationalist government. Tia Goldenberg, Fox News, "Israeli east Jerusalem plan gets cool Palestinian reception," 20 July 2018 America’s infrastructure is old; corrosion control is federally mandated to prevent pipes from crumbling into the water, but none was instituted in this case. Parul Sehgal, New York Times, "Toxic History, Poisoned Water: The Story of Flint," 3 July 2018 According to the Hollywood Reporter, the event's organizers have also instituted a new rule for 2019 that bars guests under 18 from attending, which means a few young celebrities might have to miss the event. Glamour, "The Celebrities Who Didn't Attend the Met Gala 2019 Red Carpet," 7 May 2019 The directive, first proposed in July, institutes a fee (link in French) of 5 CFA francs ($0.008) per megabyte consumed through services like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter. Casey Newton, The Verge, "Congress is getting better at questioning social media executives," 6 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

16 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for institute

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for institute

institute

noun

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

verb
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio) , -ˌtyüt\
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.
2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research
2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir
2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
2  plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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