institute

noun
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio) , -ˌtyüt \

Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as
a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind
b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields
c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute
d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize
b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation
2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ ˈin(t)-​stə-​ˌtü-​tər How to pronounce institutor (audio) , -​ˌtyü-​ \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Verb By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Ipsos institute’s exit poll showed President Andrzej Duda with 50.4 percent of the vote and rival Rafal Trzaskowski with 49.6 percent. Vanessa Geraand Monika Scislowska, BostonGlobe.com, "Poland’s momentous presidential runoff too close to call," 12 July 2020 Evers did not immediately react to the ruling, but Rick Esenberg, the president of the institute that brought the lawsuit, hailed the decision. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "In a blow to Gov. Tony Evers, state Supreme Court overturns three budget vetoes," 10 July 2020 The institute, which launched last year, will continue the work Johnson started, advocating for and organizing on behalf of the transgender community, its founder has previously told CNN. Christina Maxouris, CNN, "Google Doodle of Marsha P. Johnson, beloved trans-rights activist, will close out Pride month," 30 June 2020 The institute, in downtown Birmingham, Alabama, is in the heart of one of the most violent civil rights battlegrounds. Curtis Tate, USA TODAY, "Remembering George Floyd: Here are the civil rights museums and landmarks to visit," 9 June 2020 There is also greater opportunity to establish control and eliminate variables, to enforce uniform policies and institute standardized health protocols. Rainer Sabin, Detroit Free Press, "Big Ten's decision to keep games in-house shows how divided college football really is," 10 July 2020 Those who work with the institute typically double their score. Geoff Colvin, Fortune, "At this university, any student can sign up to get professional leadership coaching—for free," 8 July 2020 Effective May 1, 2021, if signed, the bills would allow local governments to pass ordinances that permit public sector unions to enter into collective bargaining agreements and institute binding arbitration. Tyler Arnold, Washington Examiner, "Collective bargaining could hinder police accountability in Virginia," 6 July 2020 Jefferson County and Birmingham were quicker to institute rules regulating businesses and masks in the pandemic’s early days. Connor Sheets | Csheets@al.com, al, "Jefferson County’s COVID-19 cases skyrocket," 4 July 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb As the American Prospect’s Harold Meyerson has noted, Los Angeles so far appears to be the only county to institute such a measure. J.c. Pan, The New Republic, "The Rise of the Creepy Reopening Industry," 4 Aug. 2020 The board meets several times a year to institute policies and consider issues such as meal prices. Linda Gandee, cleveland, "Rocky River-Lakewood Meals on Wheels looking to serve even more people," 3 Aug. 2020 This is also a good time to refer back to our fifth tip—any changes or plans you institute should have buy-in from your Black colleagues. Patia Braithwaite, SELF, "Your Black Coworkers Are Still Not Okay—Here’s How to Support Them," 31 July 2020 But others are worried that there's too many uncontrolled, moving variables to ensure students' safety as well as the teachers, coaches, and school employees who will work to institute new policies. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, "Is It Safe for Kids to Go Back to School? Here's Everything Parents Need to Know," 22 July 2020 In 2016 and again in 2017, civil rights and other groups wrote letters urging Facebook to conduct an independent civil rights audit of its content moderation system and to create a task force to institute the recommendations. Jessica Guynn, USA TODAY, "What civil rights groups want from Facebook boycott: Stop hate speech and harassment of Black users," 8 July 2020 Within minutes of the release of Logsdon’s comments, the White House scrambled to institute new procedures to insure that Trump’s Presidential Daily Briefs are placed right-side up on his Oval Office desk. Andy Borowitz, The New Yorker, "Trump May Not Have Read Brief Because He Holds Reading Material Upside Down," 1 July 2020 Schools in Virginia and in Los Angeles County, California, for instance, will institute a similar reopening plan to that of New York City, with students on rotating schedules. Cassidy Morrison, Washington Examiner, "New York City plans hybrid school reopening with students remote several days a week," 8 July 2020 The letter also recommends a statewide face covering requirement and asks that the governor allow mayors and county officials to institute requirements appropriate for their jurisdictions. Hollie Silverman, CNN, "More than 1,400 Georgia healthcare workers sign letter asking governor for more coronavirus restrictions," 4 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Time Traveler for institute

Time Traveler

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

31 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Institute.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/institute. Accessed 11 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for institute

institute

noun
How to pronounce institute (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

verb
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin-stə-ˌtüt How to pronounce institute (audio) , -ˌtyüt \
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.
2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research
2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir
2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
2 plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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