statute

noun
stat·​ute | \ ˈsta-(ˌ)chüt How to pronounce statute (audio) , -chət \

Definition of statute

1 : a law enacted by the legislative branch of a government
2 : an act of a corporation or of its founder intended as a permanent rule
3 : an international instrument setting up an agency and regulating its scope or authority

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Choose the Right Synonym for statute

law, rule, regulation, precept, statute, ordinance, canon mean a principle governing action or procedure. law implies imposition by a sovereign authority and the obligation of obedience on the part of all subject to that authority. obey the law rule applies to more restricted or specific situations. the rules of the game regulation implies prescription by authority in order to control an organization or system. regulations affecting nuclear power plants precept commonly suggests something advisory and not obligatory communicated typically through teaching. the precepts of effective writing statute implies a law enacted by a legislative body. a statute requiring the use of seat belts ordinance applies to an order governing some detail of procedure or conduct enforced by a limited authority such as a municipality. a city ordinance canon suggests in nonreligious use a principle or rule of behavior or procedure commonly accepted as a valid guide. the canons of good taste

Examples of statute in a Sentence

The state legislature passed the statute by an overwhelming margin. business practices that are prohibited by statute
Recent Examples on the Web These ratios — which are laid out in statute — help to ensure that high-quality wetlands aren’t just being replaced with low-quality wetlands of the same size, said Hoffmann, who previously worked at IDEM. Sarah Bowman, The Indianapolis Star, "Amid fierce debate, here are the facts about Indiana's wetlands program," 8 Feb. 2021 There is no deadline in the state constitution or statute for lawmakers to finish congressional redistricting, according to the Oregon State Bar. oregonlive, "Oregon lawmakers’ ability to redraw legislative lines in question, with census data delayed," 6 Feb. 2021 The Senate could then be reapportioned through statute or perhaps a national referendum. WSJ, "Notable & Quotable: Harvard Law Review," 3 Dec. 2020 Jay Johnson, a lawyer for PolyMet, said the tradition, based on statute and previous legal cases, is for the courts to presume the correctness of a state agency's decision. Jennifer Bjorhus, Star Tribune, "Minnesota Supreme Court hears argument that PolyMet misrepresented its intent for mine," 5 Nov. 2020 In a separate response, groups represented by the American Civil Liberties Union said the administration’s new policy violated the federal statute and the Constitution. Adam Liptak, New York Times, "Supreme Court Will Review Trump’s Plan to Exclude Undocumented Immigrants in Redistricting," 16 Oct. 2020 The Washington Post reports that the process of removing the statue began Saturday morning as workers affixed straps to the 900-pound statute to prepare to remove it from its base. CBS News, "Charlottesville removes Confederate statue near site of violent white nationalist rally," 13 Sep. 2020 Any findings will be forwarded to the district attorney for potential reckless endangerment charges as authorized by statute and the state COVID-19 mandate requiring post-travel quarantine. Zaz Hollander, Anchorage Daily News, "Angry, hurt and scared: Ketchikan leaders try to defuse outrage against infected traveler who broke quarantine," 18 June 2020 In 1695, the Scottish parliament ratified a preexisting statute making blasphemy a capital offense. Madeleine Kearns, National Review, "Robert Burns’s Antidote for Our Self-Righteous Times," 25 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'statute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of statute

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for statute

Middle English, from Anglo-French estatut, from Late Latin statutum law, regulation, from Latin, neuter of statutus, past participle of statuere to set up, station, from status position, state

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Time Traveler for statute

Time Traveler

The first known use of statute was in the 14th century

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Statistics for statute

Last Updated

21 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Statute.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/statute. Accessed 28 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for statute

statute

noun

English Language Learners Definition of statute

: a written law that is formally created by a government
: a written rule or regulation

statute

noun
stat·​ute | \ ˈsta-chüt How to pronounce statute (audio) \

Kids Definition of statute

: law sense 4 a state statute

statute

noun
stat·​ute | \ ˈsta-chüt How to pronounce statute (audio) \

Legal Definition of statute

1 : a law enacted by the legislative branch of a government — see also code, statutory law
2 : an act of a corporation or its founder intended as a permanent rule
3 : an international instrument setting up an agency and regulating its scope or authority the statute of the International Court of Justice

History and Etymology for statute

Latin statutum law, regulation, from neuter of statutus, past participle of statuere to set up, station, from status position, state

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Comments on statute

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