disrepute

noun
dis·​re·​pute | \ ˌdis-ri-ˈpyüt How to pronounce disrepute (audio) \

Definition of disrepute

: lack or decline of good reputation : a state of being held in low esteem

Choose the Right Synonym for disrepute

disgrace, dishonor, disrepute, infamy, ignominy mean the state or condition of suffering loss of esteem and of enduring reproach. disgrace often implies humiliation and sometimes ostracism. sent home in disgrace dishonor emphasizes the loss of honor that one has enjoyed or the loss of self-esteem. preferred death to life with dishonor disrepute stresses loss of one's good name or the acquiring of a bad reputation. a once proud name fallen into disrepute infamy usually implies notoriety as well as exceeding shame. a day that lives in infamy ignominy stresses humiliation. the ignominy of being arrested

When to Use Disrepute

A reputation can be easy to lose, and someone who is no longer respectable may eventually find he's become genuinely disreputable—the kind of person that almost no one wants to be seen with. Disrepute isn't only for individuals: A company may fall into disrepute as a result of news stories about its products' defects; drug scandals have brought entire sports into disrepute; and a scientific theory may fall into disrepute as a result of new discoveries.

Examples of disrepute in a Sentence

The theory has been in disrepute for years. a once proud name fallen into disrepute
Recent Examples on the Web But in recent years, this puritanical approach to managing the ups and downs of the economy had fallen into disrepute. Steven Pearlstein, Washington Post, 27 May 2022 But at some point these approaches came into disrepute, at least in their most overt manifestations. New York Times, 13 Apr. 2022 Russia has been banned from competing in this year's Eurovision Song Contest after the European Broadcasting Union ruled that their inclusion would bring the competition into disrepute. Terry Baddoo, USA TODAY, 10 Apr. 2022 But the practice had fallen into disrepute, especially among conservatives, as a symbol of wasteful spending that was steered by cronyism rather than actual need. Arkansas Online, 12 Mar. 2022 The decision reflects concern that, in light of the unprecedented crisis in Ukraine, the inclusion of a Russian entry in this year’s Contest would bring the competition into disrepute. K.j. Yossman, Variety, 25 Feb. 2022 Here, six ways to rescue the random spaces under a home’s eaves from disrepute. Nina Molina, WSJ, 27 Jan. 2022 The effect has been to bring science into disrepute. The Editors, National Review, 18 Jan. 2022 By the end of the Obama years, the entire concept of for-profit higher education had sunk into disrepute. James Lardner, The New Yorker, 27 Dec. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disrepute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of disrepute

1637, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of disrepute was in 1637

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Dictionary Entries Near disrepute

disreputation

disrepute

disrespect

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Cite this Entry

“Disrepute.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disrepute. Accessed 11 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for disrepute

disrepute

noun
dis·​re·​pute | \ ˌdis-ri-ˈpyüt \

Kids Definition of disrepute

: a state of not being respected or trusted by most people A cheating scandal brought the school into disrepute.

More from Merriam-Webster on disrepute

Nglish: Translation of disrepute for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of disrepute for Arabic Speakers

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