shame

noun
\ ˈshām How to pronounce shame (audio) \

Definition of shame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a painful emotion caused by consciousness of guilt, shortcoming, or impropriety
b : the susceptibility to such emotion have you no shame?
2 : a condition of humiliating disgrace or disrepute : ignominy the shame of being arrested
3a : something that brings censure or reproach also : something to be regretted : pity it's a shame you can't go
b : a cause of feeling shame

shame

verb
shamed; shaming

Definition of shame (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to bring shame to : disgrace shamed the family name
2 : to put to shame by outdoing
3 : to cause to feel shame
4 : to force by causing to feel guilty shamed into confessing

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Examples of shame in a Sentence

Noun He felt shame for his lies. How could you be so rude? Have you no shame? Her crimes brought shame upon her family. He had to endure the shame of being fired. Verb He was shamed by his behavior at the party. shamed the family name with his conviction for embezzlement
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun That his time in Madrid, then, has apparently come to such an unhappy end is a shame for all parties involved. Matias Grez, CNN, "Gareth Bale looks for a fresh start as golden stay in Madrid turns sour," 19 Sep. 2020 But shame on Congress for not insisting the central bank hew to statute. Eric Grover, National Review, "It’s Time to Rein in the Fed," 19 Sep. 2020 Taylor — who was making her NFL sideline debut — not only sought to shame McNeil on Twitter after the game, but took the opportunity to promote her upcoming NBA work. Phil Rosenthal, chicagotribune.com, "ESPN’s Maria Taylor fires back after tweet by Dan McNeil: ‘Hey ladies remember you can wear whatever you feel confident in!’," 15 Sep. 2020 On the other end of the spectrum, there’s no shame in the budget shower head game either. Courtney Thompson, CNN Underscored, "The best shower heads of 2020," 11 Sep. 2020 Much to her enduring anger and shame, her family took Vought’s hush money. Nick Schager, EW.com, "The Boys recap: I want to know what love is," 11 Sep. 2020 The gallery felt airless and less like a refuge than a place to pass through on the way to other artistic destinations, which was a shame. Steven Litt, cleveland, "Cleveland Museum of Art refreshes British gallery with splash of color, new purchases, references to sins of empire," 30 Aug. 2020 Though boredom no longer strikes most people as a sin, as acedia was for medieval monks, a dusting of shame still clings to it, especially when it can’t be blamed on a job endured to pay the bills. Margaret Talbot, The New Yorker, "What Does Boredom Do to Us—and for Us?," 20 Aug. 2020 On Monday, Alabama athletics director Greg Byrne even felt compelled to tweet-shame the large crowds of students flocking to Tuscaloosa bars. Nick Moyle, ExpressNews.com, "Texas QB Sam Ehlinger adjusting to the new reality," 19 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Whereas in British Columbia, there’s been much more of an emphasis on trust in the population, do not shame the few people who seem to be contravening guidelines. Rebecca Robbins, STAT, "An expert’s take on what the U.S., U.K did wrong in Covid-19 communications — and what others did right," 18 Sep. 2020 This isn’t to shame anyone who enjoys a good snicker at our expense. Matt Young, Houston Chronicle, "We hear your giggles, but we're still calling them Pocket Rockets," 4 Sep. 2020 Yet rather than expand access to the pods, districts are trying to shame better-off parents into refraining from providing their children with a superior education. Jason Bedrick, National Review, "Why Parents Love ‘Pandemic Pods’ for School — but Bureaucrats Hate Them," 21 Aug. 2020 An employer that at least tries to support its workers is going to reap more loyalty and productivity than one that seeks to shame them into silence. Karla L. Miller, Washington Post, "I asked for help paying for home office equipment but got a guilt trip instead," 20 Aug. 2020 Snacks that our dentists or nutritionists might shame us about. Allison Morrow, CNN, "RIP jeans. We're all eating our feelings now," 13 Aug. 2020 Further into the Q&A Sarah also shared that haters would try to shame her for being a young mom. Kori Williams, Seventeen, "Here's Everything You Need to Know About TikTok Star Sarah Magusara," 19 May 2020 The new requirement comes after a San Diego woman last month tried to publicly shame a barista who refused to serve her for not wearing a mask. cleveland, "Starbucks customers will be required to wear masks starting next week," 10 July 2020 When death penalty opponents learn the identity of drug suppliers, the state argued, the critics publicly shame the companies into refusing to provide drugs for executions. Tim Evans, The Indianapolis Star, "Indiana Supreme Court to decide if state must identify suppliers of death penalty drugs," 8 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'shame.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of shame

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for shame

Noun

Middle English, from Old English scamu; akin to Old High German scama shame

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Time Traveler for shame

Time Traveler

The first known use of shame was before the 12th century

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Statistics for shame

Last Updated

22 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Shame.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shame. Accessed 23 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for shame

shame

noun
How to pronounce shame (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of shame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling of guilt, regret, or sadness that you have because you know you have done something wrong
: ability to feel guilt, regret, or embarrassment
: dishonor or disgrace

shame

verb

English Language Learners Definition of shame (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to feel ashamed
: to force (someone) to act in a specified way by causing feelings of shame or guilt

shame

noun
\ ˈshām How to pronounce shame (audio) \

Kids Definition of shame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a painful emotion caused by having done something wrong or improper
2 : ability to feel shame Have you no shame?
3 : dishonor entry 1 sense 1, disgrace There is no shame in admitting mistakes.
4 : something that brings disgrace or causes painful emotion or strong regret It's a shame he couldn't join us.

shame

verb
shamed; shaming

Kids Definition of shame (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to make ashamed I was shamed by my actions.
3 : to force by causing to feel shame They were shamed into confessing.

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Comments on shame

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