fame

noun
\ ˈfām \

Definition of fame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : public estimation : reputation
b : popular acclaim : renown
2 archaic : rumor

fame

verb
famed; faming

Definition of fame (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 archaic : report, repute
2 : to make famous

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Synonyms & Antonyms for fame

Synonyms: Noun

celebrity, notoriety, renown

Antonyms: Noun

anonymity, oblivion, obscureness, obscurity

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Examples of fame in a Sentence

Noun

He died at the height of his fame. The book tells the story of her sudden rise to fame. He gained fame as an actor. She went to Hollywood seeking fame and fortune.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Halston originally began working as a milliner, rising to fame after designing the pillbox hat that Jacqueline Kennedy wore for the 1961 Presidential Inauguration of her husband John F. Kennedy. Chrissy Rutherford, Harper's BAZAAR, "Ewan McGregor is Set to Play Halston in New TV Series," 3 Jan. 2019 In an age when the double tap is so often the fastest path to fame, there is something appealingly old-fashioned about a literary success story. Bridget Read, Vogue, "Most Anticipated Books of 2019: 19 Picks You Should Have on Your Reading List," 1 Jan. 2019 Aluminum travel trunks are one of RIMOWA's biggest claims to fame, sold now for 82 years in various iterations. Caitlin Morton, Condé Nast Traveler, "RIMOWA's New Pop-Up Is One More Reason to Visit Aspen This Winter," 20 Dec. 2018 Elaine May Elaine May rose to fame alongside her comedic partner Mike Nichols, though their dual act only lasted a few years. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel," 16 Dec. 2018 But the Virginia-class submarine's claim to fame is its ability to hunt and destroy enemy vessels, both on the surface and skulking beneath the waves. Alex Hollings, Popular Mechanics, "What 'Hunter Killer' Gets Right About Submarine Warfare," 7 Nov. 2018 As the alum of a reality singing competition herself, Kelly Clarkson is no stranger to the emotional rollercoaster that comes along with instant fame. Alisa Wolfson, Country Living, "Kelly Clarkson Reflects on Feeling 'Alone' After Winning 'American Idol'," 23 Dec. 2018 Others feel that the fame has gotten to his head, rendering him unable to deal with minor in-game annoyances. Patricia Hernandez, The Verge, "In 2018, Ninja became Twitch’s first mainstream star," 20 Dec. 2018 Pete is a young person trying to navigate fame; harassment shouldn’t be considered a normal part of being a celebrity. De Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Pete Davidson's Instagram Post About Mental Health Is a Reminder Not to Harass Celebs Online," 17 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Trying to weave a fairy tale life from a horror story reality, Vieux-Chauvet’s heroine, Minette, rides her beauty and talent out of poverty in late-18th-century Port-au-Prince to fame onstage as a singer. Alison Mcculloch, New York Times, "Fiction in Translation," 17 Feb. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fame.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fame

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fame

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin fama report, fame; akin to Latin fari to speak — more at ban

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Learn More about fame

Dictionary Entries near fame

Fama

Famagusta

famatinite

fame

famed

fameflower

fameless

Statistics for fame

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for fame

The first known use of fame was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for fame

fame

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fame

: the condition of being known or recognized by many people

fame

noun
\ ˈfām \

Kids Definition of fame

: the fact or condition of being known or recognized by many people

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More from Merriam-Webster on fame

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fame

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fame

Spanish Central: Translation of fame

Nglish: Translation of fame for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fame for Arabic Speakers

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