repute

1 of 2

verb

re·​pute ri-ˈpyüt How to pronounce repute (audio)
reputed; reputing

repute

2 of 2

noun

1
: the character or status commonly ascribed to one : reputation
2
: the state of being favorably known, spoken of, or esteemed

Examples of repute in a Sentence

Noun that's a repair shop of good repute
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
But reputed Milwaukee crime boss Frank Balistrieri was notorious enough by the late 1970s that renowned undercover FBI agent Joseph Pistone came here to help investigate. Journal Sentinel, 17 Jan. 2024 The car was recreated to its 15-liter, 1908 specification, and when the rebuilt engine was fired up for the first time in 1982, it’s reputed to have started on its first turn. Robert Ross, Robb Report, 19 Feb. 2024 He was reputed to have thrown a plate of pasta in the face of his employer at Condé Nast. Christian House, CNN, 7 Feb. 2024 It is widely reputed to be the most famous sandwich shop in the world. Jenn Harris, Los Angeles Times, 5 Feb. 2024 Production has been underway across Adelaide and Kangaroo Island, reputed to be one of the most beautiful places in the country, and concludes this month. Patrick Frater, Variety, 19 Dec. 2023 While some of those missing are escaped indoor-only cats, the majority are free-roaming or indoor-outdoor cats reputed to kill millions of birds annually. Nicole Sours Larson, San Diego Union-Tribune, 18 Nov. 2023 Advertisement Don’t let the reputed 40 to 45 minutes of constant stirring sway you from making this Pumpkin Risotto. Julie Giuffrida, Los Angeles Times, 29 Oct. 2023 Last Wednesday, Ford, which is reputed to have the best relationship with its workers, reached a tentative agreement to end the strike at its factories. Dan Kaufman, The New Yorker, 28 Oct. 2023
Noun
The accusers had to be deemed credible, and they could not be paid or of evil repute. Rivka Galchen, The New Yorker, 15 Jan. 2024 Given such unhelpful fallout, and the unsavory repute of the payday-lender claimants, enough conservative justices may well break ranks to dismiss this bid to incinerate the CFPB, or at least sidestep it. Simon Lazarus, The New Republic, 2 Oct. 2023 Nevertheless, in the most jumper-centric era in basketball history, a shooter of this calibre and repute is always going to draw the NBA's eye. Mark Deeks, Forbes, 31 Mar. 2023 As early as 2018, Twitch’s casino section contained numerous channels of questionable repute, some of which inflated their viewer counts with bots to advertise specific slots gambling websites. Nathan Grayson, Washington Post, 21 Sep. 2022 Among hundreds of communities of Catholic sisters, the Felicians have neither the ubiquity of bigger ones like the Salesians, nor the singular focus of those like the School Sisters of Notre Dame, nor the repute of women following in Mother Teresa's footsteps in the Missionaries of Charity. Matt Sedensky, Star Tribune, 9 Apr. 2021 But Steven Benner, a levelheaded scientist of some repute, suggests that perhaps the invasion already occurred billions of years ago. Steve Nadis, Discover Magazine, 8 May 2014 The final outcome in the exchange that secured Stafford is hardly a surprise, given Kroenke’s repute as a big spender. Jarrett Bell, USA TODAY, 12 Feb. 2022 They were made by Richaud Valls, a producer and an actor of some repute in his home country of France, who found that, in the U.S., he was often typecast, because of his heavy accent, as a chef or a maître d’. Hannah Goldfield, The New Yorker, 19 June 2020

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'repute.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French reputer, from Latin reputare to reckon up, think over, from re- + putare to reckon

First Known Use

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1539, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of repute was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near repute

Cite this Entry

“Repute.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/repute. Accessed 17 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

repute

1 of 2 verb
re·​pute ri-ˈpyüt How to pronounce repute (audio)
reputed; reputing
: to have the opinion that : consider
reputed to be a millionaire

repute

2 of 2 noun
1
2
: good reputation
a scientist of repute

More from Merriam-Webster on repute

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