renown

noun
re·​nown | \ ri-ˈnau̇n How to pronounce renown (audio) \

Definition of renown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a state of being widely acclaimed and highly honored : fame
2 obsolete : report, rumor

renown

verb
renowned; renowning; renowns

Definition of renown (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to give renown to

Synonyms & Antonyms for renown

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Noun

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Examples of renown in a Sentence

Noun He achieved great renown for his discoveries. Her photographs have earned her international renown.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Schwartz was a middle-distance runner of some renown in his youth. Llewellyn King, Forbes, 1 May 2022 Thomas Harland, Daniel Burnap, Eli Terry, Seth Thomas, Riley Whiting and Silas Hoadley are among the many clock makers who brought renown to Connecticut. Hartford Courant, 22 Apr. 2022 The chance to pursue that reform came in 1906, when Montessori, now an educator of some renown, gained the backing of a group of Roman financiers. Jessica Winter, The New Yorker, 3 Mar. 2022 Her fourth book, published in 2008, was the collection Karate Chop, which became her first to be published in English and brought her international renown. Lauren Groff, The New York Review of Books, 23 Apr. 2020 Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has gained worldwide renown for his tough speeches calling for military help and sanctions from Western nations as Russia bombards his country. Washington Post, 3 Mar. 2022 The sports car icon of global renown had published his second autobiography a decade earlier. David De Jong, Forbes, 14 Apr. 2022 Garrison’s renown did make him, until his death in 1879, the personal embodiment of the abolitionist movement. Sean Wilentz, The New York Review of Books, 14 May 2020 His renown very likely helped get Little released in 1963, after years of petitions by his siblings. New York Times, 19 Mar. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb His future in question, the man, an unabashed erotic exhibitionist, has attracted renown in a country where fame is usually reserved for government ministers and top badminton players. Los Angeles Times, 4 Apr. 2022 KemperSports is renown for its expertise from the high-end resorts to municipal golf courses and lots of things in-between. Myrna Petlicki, chicagotribune.com, 8 Mar. 2022 Pop music critics and historians, who were and often still are white men, are renown for dismissing women like Houston who don’t write their own music. Los Angeles Times, 10 Feb. 2022 Iwanami Hall is renown for importing and screening award-winning foreign-language titles, hard to find Japanese films, and for helping to kick off a boom in single-screen and mini theaters in the Japanese capital. Patrick Frater, Variety, 12 Jan. 2022 Cornel West has achieved renown as a professor, philosopher, historian, intellectual and political activist. NBC News, 29 Dec. 2021 After World War II, Wally Bronner, a sign painter who had won renown for his work decorating businesses around the region in Christmas splendor, added the tinselly twinkle to Frankenmuth’s tourist industry by opening his first Christmas store. New York Times, 23 Nov. 2021 Toward the end of the century, Wilson achieved renown in the newly ascendant field of ecology. BostonGlobe.com, 15 Oct. 2021 Braun was a model citizen after that ugly episode, becoming a community philanthropist, team leader and one of the greatest clutch hitters in franchise history, renown for late-season heroics. Tom Haudricourt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 14 Sep. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'renown.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of renown

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for renown

Noun

Middle English renoun, from Anglo-French renum, renoun, from renomer to report, speak of, from re- + nomer to name, from Latin nominare, from nomin-, nomen name — more at name

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Time Traveler for renown

Time Traveler

The first known use of renown was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near renown

renovationist

renown

renowned

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Statistics for renown

Last Updated

15 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Renown.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/renown. Accessed 20 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for renown

renown

noun
re·​nown | \ ri-ˈnau̇n How to pronounce renown (audio) \

Kids Definition of renown

: the state of being widely and favorably known

More from Merriam-Webster on renown

Nglish: Translation of renown for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of renown for Arabic Speakers

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