remorse

noun
re·​morse | \ ri-ˈmȯrs \

Definition of remorse

1 : a gnawing distress arising from a sense of guilt for past wrongs : self-reproach
2 obsolete : compassion

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Choose the Right Synonym for remorse

penitence, repentance, contrition, compunction, remorse mean regret for sin or wrongdoing. penitence implies sad and humble realization of and regret for one's misdeeds. absolution is dependent upon sincere penitence repentance adds the implication of a resolve to change. repentance accompanied by a complete change of character contrition stresses the sorrowful regret that constitutes true penitence. tearful expressions of contrition compunction implies a painful sting of conscience especially for contemplated wrongdoing. had no compunctions about taking back what is mine remorse suggests prolonged and insistent self-reproach and mental anguish for past wrongs and especially for those whose consequences cannot be remedied. thieves untroubled by feelings of remorse

Did You Know?

In Latin, mordere means "to bite;" thus, remorse is something that "gnaws" at you over and over. In criminal court, judges are always looking for signs that a convicted felon is suffering remorse for his crime; if not, the judge may well lengthen his sentence or deny him parole after serving part of it. Remorse is stronger than mere regret; real remorse is the kind of thing that may last a lifetime.

Examples of remorse in a Sentence

I could forgive him for what he did if he showed some remorse. he felt a deep remorse for having neglected his family over the years

Recent Examples on the Web

At the sentencing, Judge John F. Walter indicated that Spadafore’s lack of remorse for not warning first responders about the hazards played into the sentence, the U.S. attorney’s office said. Alene Tchekmedyian, latimes.com, "A drug lab in Lake Elsinore exploded in November. The ex-cop behind it was just sentenced 5 years in prison," 19 June 2018 There is also some evidence of buyer's remorse on the cuts that already passed. Z. Byron Wolf, CNN, "Trump wants to cut taxes. Again. He just cut taxes.," 23 May 2018 That lump would grow into buyer's remorse when Hayes heard that, without the approval of Keystone's Alexander project, the developer would move forward with the original, big box Kite project. Emily Hopkins, Indianapolis Star, "Indianapolis Nora residents opposed a developer and won. Now, they've changed their minds.," 25 Feb. 2018 Like the novel, Tchaikovsky’s 1879 opera is a tale of love, regret and remorse told in a way that Russian authors and musicians seem to excel at. David Lyman, Detroit Free Press, "MOT's 2018-19 season includes 'Eugene Onegin,' 'Candide' and 'Grapes of Wrath'," 13 Apr. 2018 At least some American leaders are showing shame and remorse. Scott Ostler, San Francisco Chronicle, "Belichick, like Bonds, might cheat himself out of Hall," 3 Feb. 2018 Arsenal fan Piers Morgan watched Liverpool's quick demolition of Manchester City in the Champions League quarter finals with bitter remorse. SI.com, "Arsenal Fan Piers Morgan Rues Liverpool Star's 'Transformation' Under Jurgen Klopp After UCL Stunner," 5 Apr. 2018 Smith understands that nobody wants to spend $4,000 to feel buyer's remorse–and so few customers can afford to. Tyler Joe, Harper's BAZAAR, "Tales in Retail: Introducing Fashion's Chicest New E-Tailer," 13 Dec. 2016 The protesting countries pointed out that Mr. Koufontinas has expressed no remorse for his actions, while Christodoulos Xiros went missing for a year after being granted a few days’ leave from prison in 2014. Nektaria Stamouli, WSJ, "Anger Over Old Terrorists Upsets New Friendship Between Greece, U.S.," 6 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'remorse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of remorse

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for remorse

Middle English, from Anglo-French remors, from Medieval Latin remorsus, from Late Latin, act of biting again, from Latin remordēre to bite again, from re- + mordēre to bite — more at mordant

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Learn More about remorse

Dictionary Entries near remorse

remontoir

remora

remord

remorse

remorseful

remorseless

remote

Statistics for remorse

Last Updated

7 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for remorse

The first known use of remorse was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for remorse

remorse

noun

English Language Learners Definition of remorse

: a feeling of being sorry for doing something bad or wrong in the past : a feeling of guilt

remorse

noun
re·​morse | \ ri-ˈmȯrs \

Kids Definition of remorse

: deep regret for doing or saying something wrong She felt a pang of remorse after yelling.

Other Words from remorse

remorseful \ -​fəl \ adjective
remorseless \ -​ləs \ adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on remorse

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with remorse

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for remorse

Spanish Central: Translation of remorse

Nglish: Translation of remorse for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of remorse for Arabic Speakers

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