disgrace

verb
dis·​grace | \ di-ˈskrās How to pronounce disgrace (audio) , dis-ˈgrās \
disgraced; disgracing; disgraces

Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to be a source of shame to Your actions disgraced the family.
2 : to cause to lose favor (see favor entry 1 sense 1a(2)) or standing was disgraced by the hint of scandal
3 archaic : to humiliate by a superior showing thy whiteness … shall disgrace the swan— Robert Browning

disgrace

noun

Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the condition of one fallen from grace : the condition of one who has lost honor (see honor entry 1 sense 1a) left in disgrace
b : loss of grace, favor, or honor brought disgrace upon the family
2 : a source of shame Your manners are a disgrace. He's a disgrace to the profession.

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Other Words from disgrace

Verb

disgracer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disgrace

Noun

disgrace, dishonor, disrepute, infamy, ignominy mean the state or condition of suffering loss of esteem and of enduring reproach. disgrace often implies humiliation and sometimes ostracism. sent home in disgrace dishonor emphasizes the loss of honor that one has enjoyed or the loss of self-esteem. preferred death to life with dishonor disrepute stresses loss of one's good name or the acquiring of a bad reputation. a once proud name fallen into disrepute infamy usually implies notoriety as well as exceeding shame. a day that lives in infamy ignominy stresses humiliation. the ignominy of being arrested

Examples of disgrace in a Sentence

Verb Many feel that the mayor has disgraced the town government by accepting personal favors from local businesspeople. He felt he had disgraced himself by failing at school. Noun The secret was protected out of a fear of political disgrace. Many feel that the mayor has brought disgrace upon the town. She was forced to leave in disgrace. His table manners are a disgrace. The health-care system is a national disgrace.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The Republicans are selling their souls to the devil and disgracing themselves to maintain their seats in Congress. Anthony Man, sun-sentinel.com, "Conservative Christian pastor says he ‘asked and begged God’ for Donald Trump’s impeachment," 15 Oct. 2019 In 2011, recently elected as FFF president after the national men’s team had disgraced itself at the World Cup, Mr. Le Graët went to Germany for the Women’s World Cup. Peter Ford, The Christian Science Monitor, "No longer sidelined, women’s soccer attracts players and fans in France," 27 June 2019 However, in the same game Kent would disgrace himself by slapping Celtic captain Scott Brown, receiving a retrospective two match ban in the process. SI.com, "Ryan Kent: 5 Things to Know About Liverpool Star Wanted By Rangers Boss Steven Gerrard," 12 July 2019 Their would-be leaders are disgracing themselves trying to keep up. The Economist, "Conservatism is fighting for its life against reactionary nationalism," 4 July 2019 Every time the president disgraces himself or outrages the nation, Democrats run to the cameras to register their disgust. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "House Leadership Is Looking Flakey," 17 June 2019 And then Ohr, even after Steele has been discredited and disgraced, starts working with him. Fox News, "Rudy Giuliani on McGahn's testimony, origins of Russia probe," 19 Aug. 2018 Numerous celebrities, sports stars and politicians have been publicly disgraced after appearing to try to dodge the draft. Eun-young Jeong, WSJ, "South Korean Soccer Star Needs to Beat Japan or Report for Duty," 30 Aug. 2018 Any other outcome would disgrace the ruling coalition or drive Italy out of the eurozone, wreaking havoc on Europe’s banks. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "The Eurozone’s 19th Nervous Breakdown," 9 Nov. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The quality of many urban government schools is a national disgrace, and African-American children suffer most. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Trump’s Bid for the Black Vote," 6 Feb. 2020 Premiums are higher, patients are saddled with larger deductibles, and drug prices are a national disgrace. Libby Watson, The New Republic, "The Hell That Was Health Care Reform," 23 Dec. 2019 Mr Flynn left in disgrace in February 2017 and Mr McMaster departed in April 2018. The Economist, "Donald Trump falls out with the military establishment he once wooed," 28 Nov. 2019 Losing in Tucson is no disgrace, especially since the Sun Devils swept Arizona a year ago. Kent Somers, azcentral, "Arizona State basketball identity is no mystery: the Sun Devils can't shoot," 5 Jan. 2020 Documents show the company's American subsidiaries have hired or retained at least 300 employees with questionable records, including criminal convictions, allegations of violence and prior law enforcement careers that ended in disgrace. USA Today, "A security empire deployed guards with violent pasts across the U.S. Some went on to rape, assault or kill," 31 Oct. 2019 Many people have asked me how Cohn could have exited the Army-McCarthy hearings in total disgrace, taken the train back to New York, and seemingly overnight reemerged unscathed to become the darling of New York society. Adam Rathe, Town & Country, "How New York Society Embraced Roy Cohn," 24 Sep. 2019 JUSSIE SMOLLETT Chicago disgrace shrewdly picked the perfect place to get away with an obvious hoax. Kevin Cusick, Twin Cities, "Loop Newsmakers of the Year: Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman," 29 Dec. 2019 And there was the disgrace of multiple BBC journalists scoffing at Labour’s promise to plant two billion trees by 2040, a number that is by actual expert estimations ambitious but far from impossible—because, Ooh, isn’t two billion loads? Libby Watson, The New Republic, "Britons to Decide Whether to Prolong Tories’ Carnival of Austerity," 12 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disgrace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disgrace

Verb

1580, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Noun

1586, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for disgrace

Noun and Verb

Middle French, from Old Italian disgrazia, from dis- (from Latin) + grazia grace, from Latin gratia — more at grace

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Time Traveler for disgrace

Time Traveler

The first known use of disgrace was in 1580

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Statistics for disgrace

Cite this Entry

“Disgrace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disgrace. Accessed 27 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for disgrace

disgrace

verb
How to pronounce disgrace (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to feel ashamed
: to cause (someone or something) to lose or become unworthy of respect or approval

disgrace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: the condition of feeling ashamed or of losing or becoming unworthy of respect or approval
: something that you are or should be ashamed of

disgrace

verb
dis·​grace | \ di-ˈskrās How to pronounce disgrace (audio) , dis-ˈgrās \
disgraced; disgracing

Kids Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bring shame to Her behavior disgraced the family.

disgrace

noun

Kids Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the condition of being looked down on : loss of respect He resigned in disgrace.
2 : a cause of shame It was a disgrace to be chained, and he felt it deeply …— Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie

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Comments on disgrace

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