disgrace

verb
dis·​grace | \ di-ˈskrās How to pronounce disgrace (audio) , dis-ˈgrās \
disgraced; disgracing; disgraces

Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to be a source of shame to Your actions disgraced the family.
2 : to cause to lose favor (see favor entry 1 sense 1a(2)) or standing was disgraced by the hint of scandal
3 archaic : to humiliate by a superior showing thy whiteness … shall disgrace the swan— Robert Browning

disgrace

noun

Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the condition of one fallen from grace : the condition of one who has lost honor (see honor entry 1 sense 1a) left in disgrace
b : loss of grace, favor, or honor brought disgrace upon the family
2 : a source of shame Your manners are a disgrace. He's a disgrace to the profession.

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Other Words from disgrace

Verb

disgracer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disgrace

Noun

disgrace, dishonor, disrepute, infamy, ignominy mean the state or condition of suffering loss of esteem and of enduring reproach. disgrace often implies humiliation and sometimes ostracism. sent home in disgrace dishonor emphasizes the loss of honor that one has enjoyed or the loss of self-esteem. preferred death to life with dishonor disrepute stresses loss of one's good name or the acquiring of a bad reputation. a once proud name fallen into disrepute infamy usually implies notoriety as well as exceeding shame. a day that lives in infamy ignominy stresses humiliation. the ignominy of being arrested

Examples of disgrace in a Sentence

Verb Many feel that the mayor has disgraced the town government by accepting personal favors from local businesspeople. He felt he had disgraced himself by failing at school. Noun The secret was protected out of a fear of political disgrace. Many feel that the mayor has brought disgrace upon the town. She was forced to leave in disgrace. His table manners are a disgrace. The health-care system is a national disgrace.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb His downfall shows how repressive governments can move with stunning speed to disgrace their opponents, using social media and technology to amplify their divisive campaigns. BostonGlobe.com, "Threatened by Facebook disinformation, a Buddhist monk flees Cambodia," 23 Aug. 2020 Pop stars who spitefully deny the pleasure and acknowledgment of listeners who come from different political perspectives disgrace the very meaning of artistic expression. Armond White, National Review, "The Stones’ ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’ — Redefined," 22 Apr. 2020 The service was then known as the Night Rider, and the ride would not have disgraced a rodeo. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "The Enduring Romance of the Night Train," 4 May 2020 But this one swallowed his pride, and whispered flattery to his abuser, like Wormtongue in another kingdom, and praised the wisdom of the man who disgraced him. John Archibald | Jarchibald@al.com, al, "The Legend of Six White Men of a Certain Age," 12 Feb. 2020 The Republicans are selling their souls to the devil and disgracing themselves to maintain their seats in Congress. Anthony Man, sun-sentinel.com, "Conservative Christian pastor says he ‘asked and begged God’ for Donald Trump’s impeachment," 15 Oct. 2019 In 2011, recently elected as FFF president after the national men’s team had disgraced itself at the World Cup, Mr. Le Graët went to Germany for the Women’s World Cup. Peter Ford, The Christian Science Monitor, "No longer sidelined, women’s soccer attracts players and fans in France," 27 June 2019 However, in the same game Kent would disgrace himself by slapping Celtic captain Scott Brown, receiving a retrospective two match ban in the process. SI.com, "Ryan Kent: 5 Things to Know About Liverpool Star Wanted By Rangers Boss Steven Gerrard," 12 July 2019 Their would-be leaders are disgracing themselves trying to keep up. The Economist, "Conservatism is fighting for its life against reactionary nationalism," 4 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Sarkisian has pinballed around some since his second head-coaching stint ended in disgrace. Nick Moyle, ExpressNews.com, "New Texas Longhorns coach Steve Sarkisian hoping to go out on top with Alabama in CFP national championship," 7 Jan. 2021 Thirteen years later, Nixon retired again - this time, in disgrace. Gillian Brockell, BostonGlobe.com, "‘Grace and humor’: The vice presidents who certified their own election losses," 2 Jan. 2021 Former President Richard Nixon, who had resigned in disgrace, had repeatedly shown contempt for the law. Robert Moilanen, Star Tribune, "A mission for a new administration: Tell the truth, obey the law," 27 Dec. 2020 Two men associated with the Houston Astros’ sign-stealing disgrace, A.J. Hinch and Alex Cora, were hired as managers (Detroit and Boston, respectively) just as soon as their one-year suspensions ended. Bruce Jenkins, SFChronicle.com, "In a man’s world, Kim Ng carves a baseball breakthrough as Marlins’ new GM," 13 Nov. 2020 He was thrown out of a World Cup in disgrace after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. Rory Smith, New York Times, "The Most Human of Immortals," 25 Nov. 2020 None of the first nine has been like 2020 for the man who was hired to help rescue the Astros from the disgrace of their cheating scandal and bring an element of integrity to the organization. John Shea, SFChronicle.com, "Dusty Baker rises above Astros’ scandal to reach Division Series matchup with A’s," 4 Oct. 2020 Private disgrace is harder to grapple with, now that it can be turned public with a click and a swipe. Alexandra Schwartz, The New Yorker, "“Roadkill” Offers the Fantasy of Politics as Usual," 30 Nov. 2020 Once again named Argentina’s captain for the 1994 World Cup in the United States, the 33-year-old Mr. Maradona was sent home in disgrace after the second match upon testing positive for ephedrine. Liz Clarke, Washington Post, "Diego Maradona, inscrutable soccer star and Argentine legend, dies at 60," 25 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disgrace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disgrace

Verb

1580, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Noun

1586, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for disgrace

Noun and Verb

Middle French, from Old Italian disgrazia, from dis- (from Latin) + grazia grace, from Latin gratia — more at grace

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Time Traveler for disgrace

Time Traveler

The first known use of disgrace was in 1580

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Statistics for disgrace

Cite this Entry

“Disgrace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disgrace. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for disgrace

disgrace

verb
How to pronounce disgrace (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to feel ashamed
: to cause (someone or something) to lose or become unworthy of respect or approval

disgrace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: the condition of feeling ashamed or of losing or becoming unworthy of respect or approval
: something that you are or should be ashamed of

disgrace

verb
dis·​grace | \ di-ˈskrās How to pronounce disgrace (audio) , dis-ˈgrās \
disgraced; disgracing

Kids Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bring shame to Her behavior disgraced the family.

disgrace

noun

Kids Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the condition of being looked down on : loss of respect He resigned in disgrace.
2 : a cause of shame It was a disgrace to be chained, and he felt it deeply …— Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie

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Comments on disgrace

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