accompany

verb
ac·​com·​pa·​ny | \ ə-ˈkəmp-nē, -ˈkämp-; -ˈkəm-pə-, -ˈkäm- \
accompanied; accompanying

Definition of accompany

transitive verb

1 : to go with as an associate or companion She accompanied me to the store.
2 : to perform an accompaniment to or for He will be accompanying her on the piano.
3a : to cause to be in association accompanied their advice with a warning
b : to be in association with the pictures that accompany the text

intransitive verb

music : to perform an accompaniment

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Examples of accompany in a Sentence

She will accompany me to the store. Ten adults accompanied the class on their field trip. Children under 17 must be accompanied by an adult to see this movie. A delicious sauce accompanied the grilled fish. He will be accompanying her on the piano.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The delicate jewelry that accompanied look was similarly subtle and simple, a style that the duchess and mom-to-be is a huge fan of in general. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "You Can Buy Meghan Markle's Christmas Jewelry," 28 Dec. 2018 The hatred of our opponents that accompanies a party system divided by worldview is self-reinforcing and, ultimately, dangerous. Ezra Klein, Vox, "A new theory for why Republicans and Democrats see the world differently," 18 Dec. 2018 Mackenzie Herren pointed to a write-up that accompanied The Lost World: Jurassic Park and Zenny shared the jab that Netflix also took at Twilight. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "This “Gossip Girl” Description on Netflix Has Fans Reminiscing About the Show," 11 Dec. 2018 In contrast to the cheers and excitement that often accompany royal arrivals, there was a respectful silence from the small crowd today as William and Kate stepped out of their car upon arriving at the King Power Stadium. Victoria Murphy, Town & Country, "Prince William and Kate Middleton Made a Somber Visit to Leicester Today," 28 Nov. 2018 Instead, Ars Pro subscribers will see headlines, lower deks (the brief summaries that accompany story headlines), and the first three paragraphs of each story. Eric Bangeman, Ars Technica, "Introducing Classic View, a new way for subscribers to browse Ars," 18 Sep. 2018 Here, then, is clear evidence that people enjoy the sensations that accompany the fight or flight response within a non-threatening environment. Richard Stephens, Smithsonian, "The History and Psychology of Roller Coasters," 12 July 2018 Croatia has a population of just four million, and many members of its current team grew up during, or in the immediate aftermath of, the bloody, internecine war that accompanied the collapse of the former Yugoslavia. Rory Smith, New York Times, "Belgium’s Blueprint, Croatia’s Chaos, and the Murky Path to World Cup Glory," 10 July 2018 Granting a legal name change will help resolve some of the feelings of distress that accompanies the use of the teen's birth name, the appeal said. Sarah Brookbank, Cincinnati.com, "Parents of transgender teen appealing name change ruling," 10 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accompany.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of accompany

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for accompany

Middle English accompanien "to make (someone) a companion or associate, be in company with, attend," borrowed from Anglo-French acumpainer, acompaigner "to join together, frequent, keep the company of," from a-, prefix forming transitive verbs (going back to Latin ad- ad-) + cumpaing, cumpaignun companion entry 1

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Statistics for accompany

Last Updated

15 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for accompany

The first known use of accompany was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for accompany

accompany

verb

English Language Learners Definition of accompany

: to go somewhere with (someone) : to be a companion for (someone)

: to go together with (something) : to be included with (something)

: to happen or occur at the same time as or along with (something)

accompany

verb
ac·​com·​pa·​ny | \ ə-ˈkəm-pə-nē \
accompanied; accompanying

Kids Definition of accompany

1 : to go with as a companion Four adults accompanied the children on their field trip.
2 : to play a musical accompaniment for
3 : to go or occur with Heavy winds accompanied the rain.

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Comments on accompany

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