reprimand

noun
rep·​ri·​mand | \ ˈre-prə-ˌmand How to pronounce reprimand (audio) \

Definition of reprimand

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a severe or formal reproof

reprimand

verb
reprimanded; reprimanding; reprimands

Definition of reprimand (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to reprove sharply or censure formally usually from a position of authority

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Choose the Right Synonym for reprimand

Verb

reprove, rebuke, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide mean to criticize adversely. reprove implies an often kindly intent to correct a fault. gently reproved my table manners rebuke suggests a sharp or stern reproof. the papal letter rebuked dissenting clerics reprimand implies a severe, formal, often public or official rebuke. reprimanded by the ethics committee admonish suggests earnest or friendly warning and counsel. admonished by my parents to control expenses reproach and chide suggest displeasure or disappointment expressed in mild reproof or scolding. reproached him for tardiness chided by their mother for untidiness

Examples of reprimand in a Sentence

Noun while reviewing the troops, the officer delivered a curt reprimand to one of the soldiers Verb The soldiers were severely reprimanded. reprimanded the summer intern for her constant tardiness
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In Turkey, Istanbul residents flocked to the city’s shores and parks on the first weekend with no lockdown, prompting a reprimand from the health minister. Joseph Wilson, Anchorage Daily News, "World reaches 400,000 virus deaths as pope urges caution," 7 June 2020 McGrath gave one officer, Scott Aldridge, a 10-day suspension without pay, and the second, a probationary officer, received a letter of reprimand. John Caniglia, cleveland, "Report blasts former Cleveland Public Safety Director Michael McGrath for being lenient with problem police officers," 13 July 2020 In April, Martinez received a reprimand for ethical misconduct in three capital murder cases. Lauren Castle, The Arizona Republic, "Man convicted of killing Glendale police officer no longer faces death penalty," 10 July 2020 Eleven additional members with ranks ranging from deputy chief to lieutenant will receive letters of reprimand, which will negatively affect their pay and chances of promotion. Abby Ng, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'We all get wake-up calls': Milwaukee Fire Department will discipline members, begin bias training after hanging brown figurine found," 2 July 2020 Before the 2018 midterms, the President had Hannity appear onstage at his big pre-election rally, a faux pas even for Fox that earned Hannity a reprimand from his bosses. Susan B. Glasser, The New Yorker, "Trump Retreats to His Hannity Bunker," 26 June 2020 Players such as Cone, wide receiver Kendric Pryor, quarterback Graham Mertz, safety Collin Wilder and running back Garrett Groshek are among members of the current team who share their thoughts on Twitter without hesitation or fear of reprimand. Jeff Potrykus, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "UW believes it has the personnel, desire to fight racism and make student-athletes feel safe, welcome," 23 June 2020 All will likely receive punitive or nonpunitive letters of reprimand, which typically end your career. Jamie Mcintyre, Washington Examiner, "Congress wants its own inquiry into leadership failures in response to virus-stricken aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt," 22 June 2020 Chauvin became a Minneapolis police officer in 2001 and the lone reprimand in his file involved a 2007 incident when he was accused of pulling a woman out of her car after stopping her for going 10 mph (16 kph) over the speed limit. Bernard Condon, Todd Richmond, Michael R. Sisak, Anchorage Daily News, "Minneapolis officer charged with murder got medals for valor and drew previous complaints," 4 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The House on Friday voted unanimously to reprimand Representative David Schweikert, Republican of Arizona, who admitted to 11 ethics violations for financial rulebreaking and agreed to a $50,000 fine. Felicia Sonmez, BostonGlobe.com, "House votes to reprimand David Schweikert for 11 ethics violations," 31 July 2020 But one of his colleagues, a black woman on the force, is receiving praise for appearing to reprimand him after the shove. Scottie Andrew, CNN, "A Florida police officer pushed a kneeling protester to the ground. Then his black colleague stepped in," 3 June 2020 In other cities, officials have acted swiftly to reprimand officers seen using overly aggressive tactics. NBC News, "NYPD officer appears to brandish gun at protesters; mayor calls it 'absolutely unacceptable'," 1 June 2020 Specifically, Norton was reprimanded for the angle at which his body camera was placed and for failing to identify himself to Cosby and for not giving the reason for the traffic stop until asked. Billy Kobin, The Courier-Journal, "LMPD officer shoots and injures 'distressed' armed man in eastern Jefferson County," 3 June 2020 Two friends who met at the station were reprimanded for standing too close while talking, despite loudspeaker warnings about maintaining distance. Claudia Núñez, Los Angeles Times, "Construction crews back on the job in Spain, but rebuilding work life won’t be simple," 14 Apr. 2020 BrightGene’s board secretary Wang Zhengye, who gave interviews to local media outlets saying the company’s drug is not for just for laboratory use but for mass production, was also reprimanded by the exchange. Time, "Chinese Biotech Company Censured for Claiming It Could Make Experimental Coronavirus Drug," 2 Mar. 2020 The officer, who was in the midst of reprimanding a player when Beckham slapped him, resisted the urge to punch Beckham, and also decided against arresting him at the scene, court records say. cleveland, "Orleans DA wants Odell Beckham Jr. to surrender so ‘silly’ matter can be ‘disposed of’," 18 Jan. 2020 Dozens of officers, including several admirals, have been reprimanded and removed from office for more minor related violations, without going to jail. Marcus Hedahl, The Conversation, "A Navy scandal sheds light on the nature of bribery and the limits of free speech," 17 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reprimand.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reprimand

Noun

1636, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1681, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for reprimand

Noun

French réprimande, from Latin reprimenda, feminine of reprimendus, gerundive of reprimere to check — more at repress

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Time Traveler for reprimand

Time Traveler

The first known use of reprimand was in 1636

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Statistics for reprimand

Last Updated

4 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Reprimand.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reprimand. Accessed 12 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for reprimand

reprimand

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reprimand

: to speak in an angry and critical way to (someone who has done something wrong, disobeyed an order, etc.)

reprimand

noun
rep·​ri·​mand | \ ˈre-prə-ˌmand How to pronounce reprimand (audio) \

Kids Definition of reprimand

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a severe or formal criticism : censure

reprimand

verb
reprimanded; reprimanding

Kids Definition of reprimand (Entry 2 of 2)

: to criticize (a person) severely or formally

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