lecture

1 of 2

noun

lec·​ture ˈlek-chər How to pronounce lecture (audio)
-shər
1
: a discourse given before an audience or class especially for instruction
2
: a formal reproof
lectureship noun

lecture

2 of 2

verb

lectured; lecturing ˈlek-chə-riŋ How to pronounce lecture (audio)
ˈlek-shriŋ

intransitive verb

: to deliver a lecture or a course of lectures

transitive verb

1
: to deliver a lecture to
2
: to reprove formally
lecturer
ˈlek-chər-ər How to pronounce lecture (audio)
ˈlek-shrər
noun

Examples of lecture in a Sentence

Noun She's planning to give a series of lectures on modern art. Several hundred people are expected to attend the lecture. I came home late and got a lecture from my parents. I gave her a lecture about doing better in school. Verb She lectures in art at the local college. They lectured their children about the importance of honesty. I lectured her about doing better in school. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Copeland will participate in a book signing after the lecture. The Indianapolis Star, 23 Feb. 2024 Remembering the fight for voting rights Much like civil rights activists did in Mississippi decades ago, Weber’s office plans to fan out across the state registering voters, hosting lectures and education series in churches and other venues. Deborah Barfield Berry, USA TODAY, 20 Feb. 2024 The lecture will focus on what is critical to being a neighbor and how to develop being a neighbor to all. Linda McIntosh, San Diego Union-Tribune, 16 Feb. 2024 Kelly aired her frustrations while delivering the Landon Lecture at Kansas State University – a prominent lecture series that has hosted presidents, U.S. Supreme Court justices and foreign leaders. Katie Bernard, Kansas City Star, 16 Feb. 2024 Others started recording their own lectures in order to defend themselves should someone take their comments out of context. Sarah Blaskey, Miami Herald, 13 Feb. 2024 Hurdle helped to create the student organization Students for the Advancement of African American Culture to help address the issues by bringing guests on campus for lectures and events. Kamal Morgan, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 5 Feb. 2024 After the third lecture, Steacie recommended that Le Caine be allowed to oversee a small project in electronic music at NRC. IEEE Spectrum, 1 Feb. 2024 In high school, Jamie Cutter sat through lectures on abstinence in a city that had one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy in California. Gillian Dohrn, The Mercury News, 5 Feb. 2024
Verb
Putin, who was first elected in 2000 on the promise of making Russia great again, also refused to be lectured about democracy. Corky Siemaszko, NBC News, 16 Feb. 2024 One person who had met with Putin in 2021 described being stunned as the president lectured him for 25 minutes about the threat posed by the U.S. and its allies to Russia. Tribune News Service, Orange County Register, 14 Feb. 2024 No one likes to be lectured, and no one wants to be talked down to. Meghan Leahy, Washington Post, 14 Feb. 2024 Founded in 1946 though federal legislation proposed by United States Senator J. William Fulbright, the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program funds American scholars and professionals to go abroad to lecture or conduct research for up to a year. Michael T. Nietzel, Forbes, 13 Feb. 2024 To restore order, Hale decide Ernest must be reprimanded, first by whacking him with a paddle and then lecturing him to take back control of his home. Daron James, Los Angeles Times, 12 Feb. 2024 Borrego, who also lectures at the University of Houston, references a few worst-case scenarios, like in 2020 when Denbury Resources suffered a catastrophic leak on a 24-inch pipeline carrying CO2 in Mississippi. Christopher Helman, Forbes, 14 Feb. 2024 The two met two decades ago while lecturing on cultural journalism in St. Petersburg. Valerie Hopkins, New York Times, 20 Jan. 2024 Furthermore, a guest enjoying the extreme largesse of an overnight stay doesn’t really have the right to lecture the host on etiquette. Amy Dickinson, Washington Post, 12 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'lecture.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English, act of reading, from Late Latin lectura, from Latin lectus, past participle of legere

First Known Use

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1590, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Time Traveler
The first known use of lecture was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near lecture

Cite this Entry

“Lecture.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lecture. Accessed 3 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

lecture

1 of 2 noun
lec·​ture ˈlek-chər How to pronounce lecture (audio)
-shər
1
: a talk given before an audience or class especially for instruction
2

lecture

2 of 2 verb
lectured; lecturing ˈlek-chə-riŋ How to pronounce lecture (audio)
ˈlek-shriŋ
1
: to give a lecture or a series of lectures
2
: to instruct by lectures
3
lecturer
-chər-ər How to pronounce lecture (audio)
-shrər
noun

More from Merriam-Webster on lecture

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