lecture

noun
lec·​ture | \ ˈlek-chər How to pronounce lecture (audio) , -shər \

Definition of lecture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a discourse given before an audience or class especially for instruction
2 : a formal reproof

lecture

verb
lectured; lecturing\ ˈlek-​chə-​riŋ How to pronounce lecturing (audio) , ˈlek-​shriŋ \

Definition of lecture (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to deliver a lecture or a course of lectures

transitive verb

1 : to deliver a lecture to
2 : to reprove formally

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Other Words from lecture

Noun

lectureship \ ˈlek-​chər-​ˌship How to pronounce lectureship (audio) , -​shər-​ \ noun

Verb

lecturer \ ˈlek-​chər-​ər How to pronounce lecturer (audio) , ˈlek-​shrər \ noun

Examples of lecture in a Sentence

Noun She's planning to give a series of lectures on modern art. Several hundred people are expected to attend the lecture. I came home late and got a lecture from my parents. I gave her a lecture about doing better in school. Verb She lectures in art at the local college. They lectured their children about the importance of honesty. I lectured her about doing better in school.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Attend a remote lecture noon to 1 p.m. Friday, July 17 and explore the rich history of Cleveland’s Cultural Gardens with history professor John Grabowski. Joan Rusek, cleveland, "Sniff out some new activities during the dog days of summer: Valley Views," 13 July 2020 The student, who remains unnamed, recorded the lecture and reported the incident to the Cordoba office of the Argentine Jewish umbrella organization DAIA, which complained to the university. Fox News, "University professor offers bonus to students who 'find a poor Jew' in anti-Semitic lecture: reports," 8 July 2020 When the coronavirus pandemic descended on college campuses last spring, Carl Zarate joined the thousands of students whose worlds shrunk abruptly from expansive lecture halls to Zoom screens. Pia Ceres, Wired, "Colleges Gear Up for an Uncertain Fall Semester Online," 6 July 2020 And yet as a sermon on teaching, Weber’s lecture still stirs me. George Blaustein, The New Republic, "Searching for Consolation in Max Weber’s Work Ethic," 2 July 2020 After traveling on his lecture tour, visiting cities and towns in England, Scotland, and Ireland, the prolific orator was able to draw comparisons and call out the hypocrisy of celebrating Independence Day. Kwin Mosby, Travel + Leisure, "How Travel Shaped Frederick Douglass’ Famous Speech 'What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?'," 1 July 2020 Meanwhile, universities statewide have promised to re-open their dormitories and lecture halls. Samuel Zwickel, Detroit Free Press, "U-M researchers: Only two-thirds of parents ‘likely’ to send kids to school amid pandemic," 26 June 2020 Peris, an Air Force veteran and political science professor at UCLA, was placed under investigation by UCLA’s Discrimination Prevention Office after a student posted a portion of his lecture on social media earlier this month. Fox News, "UCLA's targeting of professor who used N-word while quoting MLK sparks Education Department warning," 25 June 2020 Inside, retractable seating fills a room that can be used as a lecture hall. Jon Arnold, Dallas News, "Newly renovated McKinney library opens to visitors," 25 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The protester then turned his rage against the black officer and began to lecture him about morals, before comparing him to Judas Iscariot. Nick Givas, Fox News, "NYC Occupy City Hall protesters seen taunting NYPD: 'Black Judas'," 2 July 2020 Britain's Cambridge University announced Wednesday that all in-person lectures will be canceled through the 2020-21 academic year because of the pandemic. Collin Binkley, Houston Chronicle, "Colleges plan fall opening, but campuses won't look the same," 21 May 2020 Cambridge University on Tuesday became the first British university to move all student lectures online for the upcoming academic year. Isabella Kwai, New York Times, "Coronavirus Inquiry, E.U. Fund, Cyclone Amphan: Your Wednesday Briefing," 20 May 2020 The character of Serena Joy in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, who once worked full-time lecturing women on the sanctity of staying home, was partly inspired by her. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "The First Great TV Series of the Year," 17 Apr. 2020 All public lectures and visitor programs are temporarily suspended. Andrew Wolfson, The Courier-Journal, "State postpones most court hearings but jailed defendants awaiting trial still at risk," 13 Mar. 2020 Britain was on the cusp of entering the emergency phase of the crisis, when the daily death toll would take off and the economy would be placed on life support, yet the prime minister believed the country needed lifting, not lecturing. Tom Mctague, The Atlantic, "The Risks of Boris Johnson’s Relentless Optimism," 27 Apr. 2020 Students will not be seeing or hearing any in-person lectures but will still be expected to complete any coursework and assignments given out by professors. Devi Shastri, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Marquette University moving online, telling students to avoid returning to campus if possible," 12 Mar. 2020 The focus is on the shows where the winners collect their trophies and lecture their lessers. Lou Weiss, WSJ, "In Praise of the Hollywood Yarn," 5 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lecture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lecture

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1590, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for lecture

Noun

Middle English, act of reading, from Late Latin lectura, from Latin lectus, past participle of legere

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Time Traveler for lecture

Time Traveler

The first known use of lecture was in the 15th century

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Statistics for lecture

Last Updated

19 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Lecture.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lecture. Accessed 8 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for lecture

lecture

noun
How to pronounce lecture (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of lecture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a talk or speech given to a group of people to teach them about a particular subject
: a talk that criticizes someone's behavior in an angry or serious way

lecture

verb

English Language Learners Definition of lecture (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give a talk or a series of talks to a group of people to teach them about a particular subject
: to talk to (someone) in an angry or serious way

lecture

noun
lec·​ture | \ ˈlek-chər How to pronounce lecture (audio) \

Kids Definition of lecture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a talk or speech that teaches something
2 : a serious talk or scolding

lecture

verb
lectured; lecturing

Kids Definition of lecture (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give a talk or speech that teaches something
2 : to give a serious or angry talk to Dad lectured us about studying.

Other Words from lecture

lecturer noun

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Comments on lecture

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