scold

noun
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \

Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : one who scolds habitually or persistently
b dated, now sometimes offensive : a woman who disturbs the public peace by noisy and quarrelsome or abusive behavior
2 : scolding

scold

verb
scolded; scolding; scolds

Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 obsolete : to quarrel noisily
2 : to find fault noisily or angrily

transitive verb

: to censure severely or angrily : rebuke

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Other Words from scold

Verb

scolder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scold

Verb

scold, upbraid, berate, rail, revile, vituperate mean to reproach angrily and abusively. scold implies rebuking in irritation or ill temper justly or unjustly. angrily scolding the children upbraid implies censuring on definite and usually justifiable grounds. upbraided her assistants for poor research berate suggests prolonged and often abusive scolding. berated continually by an overbearing boss rail (at or against) stresses an unrestrained berating. railed loudly at their insolence revile implies a scurrilous, abusive attack prompted by anger or hatred. an alleged killer reviled in the press vituperate suggests a violent reviling. was vituperated for betraying his friends

Examples of scold in a Sentence

Noun

He can be a bit of a scold sometimes.

Verb

“You should never have done that,” she scolded. he scolded the kids for not cleaning up the mess they had made in the kitchen
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The letter, which is twice as long as the press release, is a masterpiece of pure scold. WSJ, "Notable & Quotable: Yale Law," 15 July 2018 Pollan’s literary persona has a rare, almost Thoreauvian affect: the lovable scold. Tom Bissell, New York Times, "Michael Pollan Drops Acid — and Comes Back From His Trip Convinced," 4 June 2018 Sotomayor compared Trump's policy to the internment of Japanese Americans that was upheld by the Supreme Court during World War II, an assertion that drew a scold from Roberts, but which resonated with Carson and Ellison. Richard Wolf, Indianapolis Star, "Supreme Court ruling on Donald Trump's travel ban a 'shameful sanctioning of discrimination,' Andre Carson says," 26 June 2018 Out on the course, a pair of Eastern kingbirds pugnaciously defended territory against all comers, all the while giving their characteristic tinkling scold. Taylor Piephoff, charlotteobserver, "Chasing rarities can be fun, but enjoy the common species, too," 6 June 2018 Considering how often progressives are portrayed as joyless scolds, this is a message that needs to get out more. Katha Pollitt, New York Times, "A Professional Troublemaker’s Guide for Young Activists," 25 Apr. 2018 On Wednesday, in drafty Fire Station No. 4, facing dozens of Boiseans worried about growth at the city’s first town hall meeting in recent memory, Bieter was a scold. Maria L. La Ganga, idahostatesman, "Mayor Bieter to Boise: We can't 'mobilize' at borders, keep growth out | Idaho Statesman," 12 Apr. 2018 During one experiment, Erez had an actress scold neonatal intensive care (NICU) physicians and nurses before a simulated procedure. Ashley Merryman, Washington Post, "President Trump’s worst behaviors can infect us all just like the flu, according to science.," 29 Mar. 2018 Belichick is Darth Vader in a hoodie, a humorless scold with a death stare more powerful than the First Order’s Starkiller Base planet destroyer. Tricia Romano, Longreads, "Why We Love to Hate Tom Brady," 31 Jan. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Frankly, there’s something amusingly insolent about it, like scolding an egomaniacal lead guitarist, only to watch him unleash an indulgent, one-hour solo. WSJ, "The Baseball Game That Almost Never Ended," 28 Oct. 2018 Last year’s gathering, when Trump scolded them as defense cheapskates and refused to say the United States was committed to their mutual defense pact, is still fresh in many minds. Washington Post, "After ‘diplomatic equivalent of a multiple-car pileup,’ U.S. allies brace for NATO summit," 28 June 2018 Trump scolded leaders here and singled out some specific countries, including Germany and Spain, for failing to contribute more to their defenses and for relying too heavily on the largess of the United States. Michael Birnbaum, Washington Post, "Trump upends NATO summit, demanding immediate spending increases or he will ‘do his own thing’," 12 July 2018 The root of the trouble lies in the mistaken notion that the function of a mother is to be always correcting, scolding, ordering them about and organizing their activities. Lauren Hubbard, Town & Country, "What Was Queen Victoria Like as a Mother?," 13 Jan. 2019 From that point on, the president and his supporters were able to portray Mr. Clinton as the victim of prurient scolds. Barton Swaim, WSJ, "Politics: High Stakes and ‘High Crimes’," 1 Nov. 2018 Luckily, the adorable moment was caught on camera, including Prince Harry jokingly scolding the toddler. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Had the Most Adorable Reaction to a Fan's Drawing of Them," 14 July 2018 In January 2016, before investing in WeWork, Mr. Son scolded CEO Adam Neumann for moving too slowly. Mayumi Negishi, WSJ, "SoftBank Gives Startups Billions of Reasons to Hold Off IPOs," 13 Oct. 2018 Hilariously, a fed-up Karamo gives up at the hour mark, before being scolded by host Nicole Byer. Joseph Hernandez, chicagotribune.com, "This 7-minute 'Queer Eye' and 'Nailed It' mashup is all you need in your life," 29 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scold

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for scold

Noun

Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse

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Time Traveler for scold

The first known use of scold was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for scold

scold

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person who often criticizes other people in an angry way : someone who scolds other people too often

scold

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: to speak in an angry or critical way to (someone who has done something wrong)

scold

verb
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \
scolded; scolding

Kids Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to find fault with or criticize in an angry way Claudia … scolded him about the need to eat properly.— E. L. Konigsburg, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Other Words from scold

scolding noun

scold

noun

Kids Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who frequently criticizes and blames

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More from Merriam-Webster on scold

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with scold

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for scold

Spanish Central: Translation of scold

Nglish: Translation of scold for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scold for Arabic Speakers

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