scold

noun
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \

Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : one who scolds habitually or persistently
b dated, now sometimes offensive : a woman who disturbs the public peace by noisy and quarrelsome or abusive behavior
2 : scolding

scold

verb
scolded; scolding; scolds

Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 obsolete : to quarrel noisily
2 : to find fault noisily or angrily

transitive verb

: to censure usually severely or angrily : rebuke

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Other Words from scold

Verb

scolder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scold

Verb

scold, upbraid, berate, rail, revile, vituperate mean to reproach angrily and abusively. scold implies rebuking in irritation or ill temper justly or unjustly. angrily scolding the children upbraid implies censuring on definite and usually justifiable grounds. upbraided her assistants for poor research berate suggests prolonged and often abusive scolding. berated continually by an overbearing boss rail (at or against) stresses an unrestrained berating. railed loudly at their insolence revile implies a scurrilous, abusive attack prompted by anger or hatred. an alleged killer reviled in the press vituperate suggests a violent reviling. was vituperated for betraying his friends

Examples of scold in a Sentence

Noun

He can be a bit of a scold sometimes.

Verb

“You should never have done that,” she scolded. he scolded the kids for not cleaning up the mess they had made in the kitchen
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Who better to tackle this subject than history scold Phil Goodstein? Sandra Dallas, The Denver Post, "Regional books: “Denver School Book,” “Aloha Rodeo” and more," 13 June 2019 But analysts aren’t convinced that the United States will do much more than scold. Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post, "Will Sudan’s military crush hope for democracy?," 5 June 2019 The sclerotic leadership of the Democratic Party and the ponderous scolds at the New York Times speak to the fierce urgency of someday, maybe. Kevin Baker, Harper's magazine, "Where Our New World Begins," 10 May 2019 The letter, which is twice as long as the press release, is a masterpiece of pure scold. WSJ, "Notable & Quotable: Yale Law," 15 July 2018 Pollan’s literary persona has a rare, almost Thoreauvian affect: the lovable scold. Tom Bissell, New York Times, "Michael Pollan Drops Acid — and Comes Back From His Trip Convinced," 4 June 2018 Sotomayor compared Trump's policy to the internment of Japanese Americans that was upheld by the Supreme Court during World War II, an assertion that drew a scold from Roberts, but which resonated with Carson and Ellison. Richard Wolf, Indianapolis Star, "Supreme Court ruling on Donald Trump's travel ban a 'shameful sanctioning of discrimination,' Andre Carson says," 26 June 2018 Out on the course, a pair of Eastern kingbirds pugnaciously defended territory against all comers, all the while giving their characteristic tinkling scold. Taylor Piephoff, charlotteobserver, "Chasing rarities can be fun, but enjoy the common species, too," 6 June 2018 Considering how often progressives are portrayed as joyless scolds, this is a message that needs to get out more. Katha Pollitt, New York Times, "A Professional Troublemaker’s Guide for Young Activists," 25 Apr. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

He was even scolded by the Queen for doing it at Trooping the Colour in 2016! Heather Finn, Good Housekeeping, "Prince William Crouches Down When He Talks to His Kids — Here's Why You Should Too," 6 June 2019 When your doc scolds you for not wearing your brace. Emily Wang, Allure, "Kaley Cuoco Shut Down Nipple-Shaming Instagram Trolls Who Commented on Her Workout Video," 24 July 2018 When your doc scolds you for not wearing your brace. Emily Wang, Glamour, "Now People Are Shaming Kaley Cuoco For Her Nipples, and Will This Ever Stop?," 24 July 2018 Later, back in Natalie’s room, Adora finds Camille and scolds her for snooping in the daughter’s room. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Pointed Observations About Sharp Objects Episode 2," 16 July 2018 One young man started angrily swearing and others scolded him to behave. Joshua Partlow, chicagotribune.com, "Inside the church where Nicaraguan paramilitaries laid siege on university students," 14 July 2018 Tester, who is seeking a third term, is himself a farmer from the little town of Big Sandy and has already used the tariff issue to scold Trump. Mathew Brown And Matt Volz, The Christian Science Monitor, "Trump trade policies cause deep ripples in agriculture country," 30 Apr. 2018 Frankly, there’s something amusingly insolent about it, like scolding an egomaniacal lead guitarist, only to watch him unleash an indulgent, one-hour solo. WSJ, "The Baseball Game That Almost Never Ended," 28 Oct. 2018 Last year’s gathering, when Trump scolded them as defense cheapskates and refused to say the United States was committed to their mutual defense pact, is still fresh in many minds. Washington Post, "After ‘diplomatic equivalent of a multiple-car pileup,’ U.S. allies brace for NATO summit," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scold

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for scold

Noun

Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse

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Statistics for scold

Last Updated

20 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for scold

The first known use of scold was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for scold

scold

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person who often criticizes other people in an angry way : someone who scolds other people too often

scold

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: to speak in an angry or critical way to (someone who has done something wrong)

scold

verb
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \
scolded; scolding

Kids Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to find fault with or criticize in an angry way Claudia … scolded him about the need to eat properly.— E. L. Konigsburg, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Other Words from scold

scolding noun

scold

noun

Kids Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who frequently criticizes and blames

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More from Merriam-Webster on scold

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with scold

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for scold

Spanish Central: Translation of scold

Nglish: Translation of scold for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scold for Arabic Speakers

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