scold

noun
\ ˈskōld \

Definition of scold 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : one who scolds habitually or persistently

b dated, now sometimes offensive : a woman who disturbs the public peace by noisy and quarrelsome or abusive behavior

2 : scolding

scold

verb
scolded; scolding; scolds

Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 obsolete : to quarrel noisily

2 : to find fault noisily or angrily

transitive verb

: to censure severely or angrily : rebuke

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Other words from scold

Verb

scolder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scold

Verb

scold, upbraid, berate, rail, revile, vituperate mean to reproach angrily and abusively. scold implies rebuking in irritation or ill temper justly or unjustly. angrily scolding the children upbraid implies censuring on definite and usually justifiable grounds. upbraided her assistants for poor research berate suggests prolonged and often abusive scolding. berated continually by an overbearing boss rail (at or against) stresses an unrestrained berating. railed loudly at their insolence revile implies a scurrilous, abusive attack prompted by anger or hatred. an alleged killer reviled in the press vituperate suggests a violent reviling. was vituperated for betraying his friends

Examples of scold in a Sentence

Noun

He can be a bit of a scold sometimes.

Verb

“You should never have done that,” she scolded. he scolded the kids for not cleaning up the mess they had made in the kitchen
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Sotomayor compared Trump's policy to the internment of Japanese Americans that was upheld by the Supreme Court during World War II, an assertion that drew a scold from Roberts, but which resonated with Carson and Ellison. Richard Wolf, Indianapolis Star, "Supreme Court ruling on Donald Trump's travel ban a 'shameful sanctioning of discrimination,' Andre Carson says," 26 June 2018 Out on the course, a pair of Eastern kingbirds pugnaciously defended territory against all comers, all the while giving their characteristic tinkling scold. Taylor Piephoff, charlotteobserver, "Chasing rarities can be fun, but enjoy the common species, too," 6 June 2018 Considering how often progressives are portrayed as joyless scolds, this is a message that needs to get out more. Katha Pollitt, New York Times, "A Professional Troublemaker’s Guide for Young Activists," 25 Apr. 2018 On Wednesday, in drafty Fire Station No. 4, facing dozens of Boiseans worried about growth at the city’s first town hall meeting in recent memory, Bieter was a scold. Maria L. La Ganga, idahostatesman, "Mayor Bieter to Boise: We can't 'mobilize' at borders, keep growth out | Idaho Statesman," 12 Apr. 2018 During one experiment, Erez had an actress scold neonatal intensive care (NICU) physicians and nurses before a simulated procedure. Ashley Merryman, Washington Post, "President Trump’s worst behaviors can infect us all just like the flu, according to science.," 29 Mar. 2018 Belichick is Darth Vader in a hoodie, a humorless scold with a death stare more powerful than the First Order’s Starkiller Base planet destroyer. Tricia Romano, Longreads, "Why We Love to Hate Tom Brady," 31 Jan. 2018 At which point her little sister — ever the explainer, ever the scold — declared that in captivity, the dolphins’ signals bounce crazily off the walls; their capacity for echolocation drives them mad. Kerry Howley, Daily Intelligencer, "‘The World’s Biggest Terrorist Has a Pikachu Bedspread’," 22 Dec. 2017 Not too long ago academic and media scolds were dismissing U.S. drug research as providing little more than marginal gains. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Hopeful News of the Week," 31 Aug. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Kuipers scolded Neymar to stop yapping at him about uncalled fouls, then delivered a yellow card when Neymar slammed the ball with his hand after yet another didn’t go his way. Matthew Futterman And Victor Mather, New York Times, "Brazil Gets Its First Win, a Triumph of Grit More Than Style," 23 June 2018 News reports have described children as young as five being scolded for playing, one teenager teaching others how to change a small child’s diaper, and caretakers not being permitted to touch children. NBC News, "Many children detained under 'zero tolerance' border policy are under 13," 21 June 2018 Silver, executive director of the 10,000 Years Institute, an environmental nonprofit, gently scolds if crew members on their way to the worksite walk past a weed without pulling it. Lynda V. Mapes, The Seattle Times, "Battling Scotch broom along Olympic’s Hoh River that threatens fish, forests," 27 May 2018 He's also been seen on TV furiously scolding his ministers for the absence of decent public transportation. Gustavo Ocando Alex, miamiherald, "With little public transportation, Venezuelans resort to dangerous, illegal ‘kennels’ to get around," 12 July 2018 Cash, played with laconic charm by Stanfield, is a relatable hero, but Detroit is ill-served by Riley’s script, existing primarily to explain the film’s heavier themes and scold her boyfriend for his ethical lapses. David Sims, The Atlantic, "Sorry to Bother You Is Fizzy, Flawed, and Fascinating," 6 July 2018 After she was arrested, along with two daughters who attended St. Mary Catholic elementary school, for picketing a Safeway store, the school nuns scolded her. Richard J. Gonzales, star-telegram, "Fort Worth’s Chicana Queen devoted her life to social justice," 12 June 2018 Judge Rex Burlison last week rejected a motion from Greitens' attorneys to dismiss the invasion-of-privacy case based on allegations that prosecutors had withheld evidence, but the judge also scolded prosecutors. Joseph Bustos, Bryan Lowry And Steve Vockrodt, kansascity, "Attorney of ex-husband in Greitens case received $100,000 from unknown source | The Kansas City Star," 23 Apr. 2018 Lawyer Alan Dershowitz scolded Hannity on his prime-time show Monday evening for not mentioning the relationship. NBC News, "Sean Hannity criticized by Fox News contributors over Cohen relationship," 17 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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History and Etymology for scold

Noun

Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse

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More Definitions for scold

scold

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person who often criticizes other people in an angry way : someone who scolds other people too often

scold

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: to speak in an angry or critical way to (someone who has done something wrong)

scold

verb
\ ˈskōld \
scolded; scolding

Kids Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to find fault with or criticize in an angry way Claudia … scolded him about the need to eat properly. —E. L. Konigsburg, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Other words from scold

scolding noun

scold

noun

Kids Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who frequently criticizes and blames

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