scold

verb
scolded; scolding; scolds

Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to censure usually severely or angrily : rebuke

intransitive verb

1 : to find fault noisily or angrily
2 obsolete : to quarrel noisily

scold

noun
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \

Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : one who scolds habitually or persistently
b dated, now sometimes offensive : a woman who disturbs the public peace by noisy and quarrelsome or abusive behavior

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Other Words from scold

Verb

scolder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scold

Verb

scold, upbraid, berate, rail, revile, vituperate mean to reproach angrily and abusively. scold implies rebuking in irritation or ill temper justly or unjustly. angrily scolding the children upbraid implies censuring on definite and usually justifiable grounds. upbraided her assistants for poor research berate suggests prolonged and often abusive scolding. berated continually by an overbearing boss rail (at or against) stresses an unrestrained berating. railed loudly at their insolence revile implies a scurrilous, abusive attack prompted by anger or hatred. an alleged killer reviled in the press vituperate suggests a violent reviling. was vituperated for betraying his friends

Examples of scold in a Sentence

Verb “You should never have done that,” she scolded. he scolded the kids for not cleaning up the mess they had made in the kitchen Noun He can be a bit of a scold sometimes.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In August Canada’s ethics commissioner scolded him for leaning on the justice minister last year to drop a prosecution for corruption of SNC-Lavalin, an engineering firm based in Quebec, a province vital to the Liberals’ electoral prospects. The Economist, "Climate change dominates Canada’s election," 10 Oct. 2019 The Evidence: The White House reportedly held private meetings with four Cabinet officials to scold them about ethics scandals, including Shulkin, Carson, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt. Margaret Hartmann, Daily Intelligencer, "A Guide to Which Trump Staffer Is Getting Fired Next," 16 Mar. 2018 Sometimes child abuse specialists send notes scolding ER physicians for failing to flag children, even though those physicians did not believe the child had been abused, several doctors said. NBC News, "An ER doctor was charged with abusing his baby. But 15 medical experts say there's no proof.," 27 Jan. 2020 The debate over the rules got so contentious, Chief Justice John Roberts had to step in and scold both the Democratic House managers and the President's defense team. Aj Willingham, CNN, "5 things to know for January 22: Impeachment, coronavirus, Davos, Lebanon, Boeing," 22 Jan. 2020 Establishment Democrats scold Republican critics of the intelligence community as unpatriotic stooges of President Trump. Jack Crowe, National Review, "In Long-Shot California Congressional Bid, George Papadopoulos Sells Himself as a Candidate for Our Age of Distrust," 20 Jan. 2020 Just telling the story makes Gerwig laugh; there’s nothing self-righteous or scolding about her tone. Stephanie Zacharek, Time, "Greta Gerwig Didn't Get a Best Director Nod. But the Radical Triumph of Little Women Will Outlive the Oscars," 15 Jan. 2020 The announcements of the show's trailer have been bombarded with disapproving memes, viewers noping out, and messages scolding Netflix for getting involved with the notorious business. Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "Goop’s Netflix trailer: Paltrow sinks into a vagina, spews pseudoscience," 6 Jan. 2020 Jones has major concerns about smartphones, but his photographs of the smartphone-addicted are playful rather than scolding. Wired, "Society Photographer Turns His Lens on Smartphone Addiction," 2 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But what gets lost in that mess is that journalists aren’t just naysayers and scolds. Robert Hackett, Fortune, "Crypto Needs Journalists More Than It Wants to Admit," 27 Nov. 2019 Some scolds want to hug the newspaper’s staff members. John Kass, chicagotribune.com, "Column: Northwestern University, the cancel culture and ‘Whatsoever things are true’," 15 Nov. 2019 But Schulz soon began fleshing out his cast with more eccentric, more specific, more driven characters: Schroeder, piano prodigy and Beethoven superfan; Lucy, vain fussbudget and perpetually aggrieved scold; Linus, thumb-sucking philosopher. Bruce Handy, The Atlantic, "The Peanuts Characters Aren’t Ordinary Kids," 29 Aug. 2019 Lately, the scold has been ascendant, and some tech companies deserve a scolding and worse. Owen Thomas, SFChronicle.com, "Tech is good. Tech is bad. Should it make us mad — or glad?," 3 July 2019 Who better to tackle this subject than history scold Phil Goodstein? Sandra Dallas, The Denver Post, "Regional books: “Denver School Book,” “Aloha Rodeo” and more," 13 June 2019 But analysts aren’t convinced that the United States will do much more than scold. Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post, "Will Sudan’s military crush hope for democracy?," 5 June 2019 The sclerotic leadership of the Democratic Party and the ponderous scolds at the New York Times speak to the fierce urgency of someday, maybe. Kevin Baker, Harper's magazine, "Where Our New World Begins," 10 May 2019 The letter, which is twice as long as the press release, is a masterpiece of pure scold. WSJ, "Notable & Quotable: Yale Law," 15 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scold

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for scold

Noun

Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse

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Time Traveler for scold

Time Traveler

The first known use of scold was in the 12th century

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Statistics for scold

Last Updated

15 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Scold.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scold. Accessed 25 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for scold

scold

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in an angry or critical way to (someone who has done something wrong)

scold

noun
How to pronounce scold (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who often criticizes other people in an angry way : someone who scolds other people too often

scold

verb
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \
scolded; scolding

Kids Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to find fault with or criticize in an angry way Claudia … scolded him about the need to eat properly.— E. L. Konigsburg, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Other Words from scold

scolding noun

scold

noun

Kids Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who frequently criticizes and blames

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More from Merriam-Webster on scold

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for scold

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with scold

Spanish Central: Translation of scold

Nglish: Translation of scold for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scold for Arabic Speakers

Comments on scold

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