scolding

noun
scold·​ing | \ ˈskōl-diŋ How to pronounce scolding (audio) \

Definition of scolding

1 : the action of one who scolds
2 : a harsh reproof gave the child a sharp scolding for running into the road

Examples of scolding in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The scolding came after several minutes of Jordan going back and forth with Dr. Anthony Fauci over lockdowns and their affect on liberties during a House Coronavirus Crisis Subcommittee meeting on Thursday. Emily Brooks, Washington Examiner, "'Shut your mouth': Maxine Waters scolds Jim Jordan for yelling match with Anthony Fauci," 15 Apr. 2021 Facilities caught mistreating children often receive little more than a mild scolding, state records show. Jessica Miller, The Salt Lake Tribune, "A girl, her hands zip tied, was forced to sit in a horse trough at a Utah ‘troubled-teen’ center," 26 Mar. 2021 The shrieks of the offender, likely a female, grew louder and more desperate as the scolding continued. Gina Decaprio Vercesi, Travel + Leisure, "Deep in Uganda's Kyambura Gorge, An Endangered Group of Chimpanzees Has Survived Against All Odds," 20 Mar. 2021 His sister, Dot, joins in the scolding of the entertainment industry. Dave Itzkoff, New York Times, "‘Animaniacs’ Is Back, Still Zany and Totally Insane-y," 17 Nov. 2020 This is an era of outrage, in and out of sports, in which every transgression seems to mean eternal condemnation, or at least stern scolding and moralizing. Tyler Kepner, New York Times, "A Friday Full of M.L.B. News and Mercy," 6 Nov. 2020 Congress has done little to increase oversight of social media companies, so the letter amounts to little more than a public scolding. David Klepper, Star Tribune, "Dems to Facebook: Get serious about misinformation, hate," 28 Sep. 2020 Congress has done little to increase oversight of social media companies, so the letter amounts to little more than a public scolding. NBC News, "Dems to Facebook: Get serious about misinformation, hate," 28 Sep. 2020 An exhibit could be dedicated to preaching, scolding and moral preening. Star Tribune, "Readers Write: American veterans, rebuilding Minneapolis," 4 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scolding.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scolding

1547, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for scolding

Time Traveler

The first known use of scolding was in 1547

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Statistics for scolding

Last Updated

27 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scolding.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scolding. Accessed 8 May. 2021.

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