scold

verb
scolded; scolding; scolds

Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to censure usually severely or angrily : rebuke

intransitive verb

1 : to find fault noisily or angrily
2 obsolete : to quarrel noisily

scold

noun
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \

Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : one who scolds habitually or persistently
b dated, now sometimes offensive : a woman who disturbs the public peace by noisy and quarrelsome or abusive behavior
2 : scolding

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Other Words from scold

Verb

scolder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scold

Verb

scold, upbraid, berate, rail, revile, vituperate mean to reproach angrily and abusively. scold implies rebuking in irritation or ill temper justly or unjustly. angrily scolding the children upbraid implies censuring on definite and usually justifiable grounds. upbraided her assistants for poor research berate suggests prolonged and often abusive scolding. berated continually by an overbearing boss rail (at or against) stresses an unrestrained berating. railed loudly at their insolence revile implies a scurrilous, abusive attack prompted by anger or hatred. an alleged killer reviled in the press vituperate suggests a violent reviling. was vituperated for betraying his friends

Examples of scold in a Sentence

Verb “You should never have done that,” she scolded. he scolded the kids for not cleaning up the mess they had made in the kitchen Noun He can be a bit of a scold sometimes.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The third-quarter incident Wednesday began after Bitadze allowed Maurice Harkless to grab a rebound and score on a dunk, which prompted Foster to scold Bitadze for his effort. BostonGlobe.com, "Essential Quality and Mandaloun won’t run in the Preakness," 6 May 2021 The show’s creators have given up being funny and opted instead to scold and censure. Armond White, National Review, "The Simpsons Tries to Cancel Morrissey," 21 Apr. 2021 An author’s creation comes to life to scold him for killing off his female characters, then begins writing herself. Helen Shaw, Vulture, "The Queen of Fractured Fairy Tales," 29 Mar. 2021 That prompted another woman to scold her for not showing respect. chicagotribune.com, "Suburban Denver gun store owner says Boulder shooting suspect passed a state background check before buying gun," 26 Mar. 2021 Before the agents go home, TJ has to scold the teams who quit, per his contract. Kyndall Cunningham, Vulture, "The Challenge: Double Agents Recap: Girls Just Wanna Have Fessy," 11 Mar. 2021 If Robert Black drops out of college, and that day could be coming soon, his professor and his parents aren't going to cry or scold. Jim Higgins, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "While his friends were on winter break, this teenage tuba player became the youngest member of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra," 2 Mar. 2021 Former President Donald Trump became the face of Twitter in recent years through his prodigious use of the social media platform to praise his allies and scold his enemies. Jonathan Berr, Forbes, "Twitter Shares Surge On Bullish Analysts’ Day," 25 Feb. 2021 The governor complained, and a federal official was sent to Mound Bayou to scold Dr. Geiger for misusing pharmacy funds, which, the official said, were meant to cover drugs to treat disease. Denise Grady, New York Times, "H. Jack Geiger, Doctor Who Fought Social Ills, Dies at 95," 28 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Seconds after their entire section overheard this gentle scold, a ball came soaring off the bat of Orioles catcher Pedro Severino. Andrew Beaton, WSJ, "Never Caught a Foul Ball at an MLB Game? This Is Your Best Shot.," 25 Apr. 2021 Dude, Daniel is now married to chief scold Amanda LaRusso. Brian Moylan, Vulture, "Cobra Kai Recap: Ali Want for Christmas," 4 Jan. 2021 Insist on clear answers to these questions, and his defenders might call you a scold. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "Donald Trump’s Reelection Campaign Is Total Camp," 30 Oct. 2020 Magda might have been introduced as a loveless scold on paper, but after ten years of playing her on television and in film, Lynn’s performance elevated Magda to an extension of Miranda’s family. Catherine Cusick, Longreads, "A Tribute to Lynn Cohen, 1933-2020," 10 Aug. 2020 But, honestly, my comment is intended — and received — as a scold and sometimes embarrasses them, as others hear it. Judith Martin, Washington Post, "Miss Manners: Handling bike lane infractions," 6 Aug. 2020 Even Blanchett’s Schlafly is a charismatic, unflappable bulldozer, not a self-righteous scold. Los Angeles Times, "How ‘the most liberated woman in America’ became TV’s next great antihero," 15 Apr. 2020 But what gets lost in that mess is that journalists aren’t just naysayers and scolds. Robert Hackett, Fortune, "Crypto Needs Journalists More Than It Wants to Admit," 27 Nov. 2019 Some scolds want to hug the newspaper’s staff members. John Kass, chicagotribune.com, "Column: Northwestern University, the cancel culture and ‘Whatsoever things are true’," 15 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scold

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for scold

Noun

Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse

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Time Traveler for scold

Time Traveler

The first known use of scold was in the 12th century

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Statistics for scold

Last Updated

8 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scold.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scold. Accessed 18 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for scold

scold

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to speak in an angry or critical way to (someone who has done something wrong)

scold

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who often criticizes other people in an angry way : someone who scolds other people too often

scold

verb
\ ˈskōld How to pronounce scold (audio) \
scolded; scolding

Kids Definition of scold

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to find fault with or criticize in an angry way Claudia … scolded him about the need to eat properly.— E. L. Konigsburg, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Other Words from scold

scolding noun

scold

noun

Kids Definition of scold (Entry 2 of 2)

: a person who frequently criticizes and blames

More from Merriam-Webster on scold

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for scold

Nglish: Translation of scold for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scold for Arabic Speakers

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