1

fold

play
noun \ˈfōld\

Definition of fold

  1. 1 :  an enclosure for sheep

  2. 2a :  a flock of sheepb :  a group of people or institutions that share a common faith, belief, activity, or enthusiasm His former colleagues would be glad to welcome him back into the fold.

Origin and Etymology of fold

Middle English, from Old English falod; akin to Old Saxon faled enclosure


First Known Use: before 12th century


2

fold

verb

Definition of fold

  1. transitive verb
  2. :  to pen up or confine (sheep) in a fold

Origin and Etymology of fold

see 1fold


First Known Use: before 12th century


3

fold

verb

Definition of fold

  1. transitive verb
  2. 1 :  to lay one part over another part of fold a letter

  3. 2 :  to reduce the length or bulk of by doubling over fold a tent

  4. 3 :  to clasp together :  entwine fold the hands

  5. 4 :  to clasp or enwrap closely :  embrace

  6. 5 :  to bend (something, such as a layer of rock) into folds

  7. 6a :  to incorporate (a food ingredient) into a mixture by repeated gentle overturnings without stirring or beatingb :  to incorporate closely

  8. 7a :  to concede defeat by withdrawing (one's cards) from play (as in poker)b :  to bring to an end

  9. intransitive verb
  10. 1 :  to become doubled or pleated

  11. 2 :  to fail completely :  collapse; especially :  to go out of business

  12. 3 :  to fold one's cards (as in poker)

foldable

play \ˈfōl-də-bəl\ adjective

Origin and Etymology of fold

Middle English, from Old English fealdan; akin to Old High German faldan to fold, Greek diplasios twofold


First Known Use: before 12th century


4

fold

noun

Definition of fold

  1. 1 :  a part doubled or laid over another part :  pleat

  2. 2 :  something that is folded together or that enfolds

  3. 3a :  a bend or flexure produced in rock by forces operative after the depositing or consolidation of the rockb chiefly British :  an undulation in the landscape

  4. 4 :  a margin apparently formed by the doubling upon itself of a flat anatomical structure (such as a membrane)

  5. 5 :  a crease made by folding something (such as a newspaper)

Illustration of fold

13th Century

First Known Use of fold

13th century


-fold

suffix

Definition of -fold

  1. 1 :  multiplied by (a specified number) :  times —in adjectives a sixfold increase and adverbs repay you tenfold

  2. 2 :  having (so many) parts threefold aspect of the problem

Examples of -fold in a Sentence

  1. It will repay you tenfold.

Origin and Etymology of -fold

Middle English, from Old English -feald; akin to Old High German -falt -fold, Latin -plex, -plus, Old English fealdan



FOLD Defined for English Language Learners

-fold

suffix

Definition of -fold for English Language Learners

  • : multiplied by (a specified number) : times

  • : having (so many) parts


FOLD Defined for Kids

1

fold

play
noun \ˈfōld\

Definition of fold for Students

  1. :  an enclosure for sheep


2

fold

play
verb

Definition of fold for Students

folded

;

folding

  1. 1 :  to lay one part over or against another part fold a blanket

  2. 2 :  to clasp together fold your hands

  3. 3 :  1embrace 1 She folded the child in her arms.


3

fold

play
noun

Definition of fold for Students

  1. 1 :  an act or the result of laying one part over or against another With just a few folds he made a paper airplane.

  2. 2 :  a part laid over another part the folds of the curtain

  3. 3 :  a bend produced in a rock layer by pressure


-fold

suffix \ˌfōld\

Definition of -fold for Students

  1. 1 :  multiplied by a specified number :  times Hint: -fold is used in adjectives a twelvefold increase and adverbs repay tenfold.

  2. 2 :  having so many parts a threefold problem


Medical Dictionary

1

fold

play
intransitive verb \ˈfōld\

Medical Definition of fold

  1. :  to become doubled or pleated


2

fold

noun

Medical Definition of fold

  1. :  a margin apparently formed by the doubling upon itself of a flat anatomical structure (as a membrane)



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