embrace

verb
em·​brace | \ im-ˈbrās How to pronounce embrace (audio) \
embraced; embracing

Definition of embrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to clasp in the arms : hug
b : cherish, love
3a : to take up especially readily or gladly embrace a cause
b : to avail oneself of : welcome embraced the opportunity to study further
4a : to take in or include as a part, item, or element of a more inclusive whole charity embraces all acts that contribute to human welfare
b : to be equal or equivalent to his assets embraced $10

intransitive verb

: to participate in an embrace

embrace

noun

Definition of embrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a close encircling with the arms and pressure to the chest especially as a sign of affection : hug
2 : grip, encirclement in the embrace of terror
3 : acceptance her embrace of new ideas

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from embrace

Verb

embraceable \ im-​ˈbrā-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce embraceable (audio) \ adjective
embracement \ im-​ˈbrās-​mənt How to pronounce embracement (audio) \ noun
embracer noun
embracingly \ im-​ˈbrā-​siŋ-​lē How to pronounce embracingly (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms for embrace

Synonyms: Verb

bear-hug, clasp, crush, enclasp, enfold, grasp, hug, strain

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for embrace

Verb

adopt, embrace, espouse mean to take an opinion, policy, or practice as one's own. adopt implies accepting something created by another or foreign to one's nature. forced to adopt new policies embrace implies a ready or happy acceptance. embraced the customs of their new homeland espouse adds an implication of close attachment to a cause and a sharing of its fortunes. espoused the cause of women's rights

include, comprehend, embrace, involve mean to contain within as part of the whole. include suggests the containment of something as a constituent, component, or subordinate part of a larger whole. the price of dinner includes dessert comprehend implies that something comes within the scope of a statement or definition. his system comprehends all history embrace implies a gathering of separate items within a whole. her faith embraces both Christian and non-Christian beliefs involve suggests inclusion by virtue of the nature of the whole, whether by being its natural or inevitable consequence. the new job involves a lot of detail

Examples of embrace in a Sentence

Verb

They embraced one last time before going their separate ways. a politician who has been embraced by conservatives Charity embraces all acts of generous giving. It's a subject that embraces many areas of learning.

Noun

He held her in a warm embrace.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

This may have then shifted to the solar New Year on Jan. 1 as the South began embracing the Western calendar. Hyung-jin Kim, The Seattle Times, "S. Korean babies born Dec. 31 become 2-year-olds next day," 13 Apr. 2019 Coincidentally, Dolce & Gabbana's Alta Moda runway show took place the same weekend as the couple's nuptials—and this fashion-forward bride embraced the happy coincidence. Tamara Abraham, Harper's BAZAAR, "This Epic Lake Como Wedding Had It All: An Alta Moda Photoshoot, Fireworks, and a Surprise Opera," 11 Apr. 2019 Barbara and Elisabeth ended up embracing by the time the cameras started rolling again, seemingly making peace after the heated discussion. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "‘The View’ Fans Shocked at EXPLOSIVE Audio of Elisabeth Hasselbeck After a Feud With Barbara Walters," 5 Apr. 2019 Developer Harry Macklowe, who has worked with the likes of Elle Decor A-List architects Rafael Viñoly and Deborah Berke, has a knack for innovation and isn’t shy about pushing the limits of design and embracing a bold aesthetic. Samantha Swenson, ELLE Decor, "Interior Designer Cyril Vergniol Says Goodbye to Cookie-Cutter Apartments," 8 Mar. 2019 After Helen embraced the idea, President Taft believed the cherry blossom trees could serve another purpose beyond their obvious beauty—the President was hoping to forge a friendship with Japan, National Geographic reports. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "How Cherry Blossoms Became the Most Celebrated Event of the Spring," 2 Apr. 2019 Many cultures throughout Europe embraced the idea that eggs had life-giving associations. Arricca Elin Sansone, Country Living, "The History of Easter Eggs and Why They're Decorated," 25 Feb. 2019 Before the fantastic future comes a very practical present Pressure to create economic growth has led cities to embrace tech with open arms—for better or for worse. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Big cities courting big tech helped define 2018," 18 Dec. 2018 Trading for crops before embracing agriculture is common. Mark Barna, Discover Magazine, "When Farmers and Foragers First Met," 24 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Instagram on Tuesday unveiled Checkout, a new feature that lets users make purchases inside the app without the annoyance of ever leaving Facebook's warm embrace. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Instagram's New Shopping Feature Makes it Easier Than Ever to Never Leave Facebook," 20 Mar. 2019 The embrace seen ’round the world happened Monday, March 11, during a Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey in London. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton Hugged Today, Just FYI," 11 Mar. 2019 Twitter’s re-embrace of live tweets gives me hope that the company will continue to elevate real-time features across the platform. Casey Newton, The Verge, "Twitter is relaunching the reverse-chronological feed as an option for all users starting today," 18 Dec. 2018 This is partly due to the country’s embrace of sustainable tourism, which encourages development. Mary Holland, Condé Nast Traveler, "Why Your Next Safari Should Be in Namibia," 6 Nov. 2018 Justin Haskins: Democrats' embrace of socialism may win primary elections -- but look out in November. Fox News, "FOX NEWS FIRST: Three states declare emergency ahead of Hurricane Florence; Pence to 'Anonymous': Resign now," 10 Sep. 2018 We were immediately attracted to the mix of old and new buildings here, to the village’s obvious embrace of its historical heritage and to how warmly we were received. Sara Clarkson, chicagotribune.com, "I was seeking a hometown for my kids. Hinsdale provided one for the whole family.," 11 July 2018 The cover shot features Turner with her arms around Williams in a warm embrace. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, "Game of Thrones Stars Maisie Williams and Sophie Turner Look So Different on the Cover of Rolling Stone," 27 Mar. 2019 Not all black conservatives receive such a warm embrace. Emily Stewart, Vox, "Diamond and Silk, Fox & Friends’ favorite black Trump supporters, explained," 5 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'embrace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of embrace

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1592, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for embrace

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French embracer, from en- + brace pair of arms — more at brace

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about embrace

Dictionary Entries near embrace

embower

embox

embr

embrace

embraceor

embracery

embracive

Statistics for embrace

Last Updated

22 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for embrace

The first known use of embrace was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for embrace

embrace

verb

English Language Learners Definition of embrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hold someone in your arms as a way of expressing love or friendship
: to accept (something or someone) readily or gladly
: to use (an opportunity) eagerly

embrace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of embrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of holding someone in your arms : the act of embracing someone

embrace

verb
em·​brace | \ im-ˈbrās How to pronounce embrace (audio) \
embraced; embracing

Kids Definition of embrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to hold in the arms : hug The old friends embraced each other.
2 : to surround on all sides Low hills embraced the valley.
3 : to accept readily or gladly She is always ready to embrace an opportunity.
4 : include Mathematics embraces arithmetic, algebra, and geometry.

embrace

noun

Kids Definition of embrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of holding in the arms : hug

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on embrace

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with embrace

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for embrace

Spanish Central: Translation of embrace

Nglish: Translation of embrace for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of embrace for Arabic Speakers

Comments on embrace

What made you want to look up embrace? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to move or proceed with twists and turns

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Words from Greek and Latin Quiz

  • roman forum
  • Which of the following months comes from a Latin word for “ten”?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Bee Cubed

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!