hug

verb
\ ˈhəg How to pronounce hug (audio) \
hugged; hugging; hugs

Definition of hug

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive + intransitive

1a : to press (someone) tightly in one's arms especially as a sign of affection They hugged each other before saying goodbye. We hugged briefly.
b : to hold (something) tightly with the arms She hugged her knees to her chest.
c : to wrap one's arms around (oneself) She was wearing only a wraparound denim skirt over her black bathing suit, and in the chill of approaching evening was hugging herself.— John Updike(figurative) Jerome looked puzzled, or pretended to. In reality he was hugging himself with delight.— Lucy Maud Montgomery
2 : to stay close to (something) a road that hugs the river a boat hugging the shore clothes that hug your body's curves [=tight-fitting clothes]
3 : to hold (something) fast : cherish hugged his miseries like a sulky child— John Buchan

hug

noun
plural hugs

Definition of hug (Entry 2 of 2)

: a close embrace with the arms especially as a sign of affection She gave me a hug. hugs and kisses "He was very, very compassionate. Very loving. He always gave you a hug hello and a hug goodbye."The Salt Lake Tribune Peggotty was not slow to respond, and ratify the treaty of friendship by giving me one of her best hugs.— Charles Dickens

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Other Words from hug

Verb

huggable \ ˈhə-​gə-​bəl How to pronounce huggable (audio) \ adjective
… whenever you get a chance at a reunion to hug someone who looks huggable, do it. — Mike Deupree
hugger noun, plural huggers
Senior is restrained, the sort of man you lean close to, to hear. Junior is a hugger and kisser, buoyant, vibrant, colorful. — Rick Reilly

Examples of hug in a Sentence

Verb We hugged briefly, and then it was time to say goodbye. I hugged my knees to my chest. The road hugs the river. The boat hugged the shore.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Don't hug with your checks together facing the same way. Sonia Ramirez, Houston Chronicle, "Experts suggest hugs needed more than ever during pandemic," 3 Aug. 2020 And Aho, upon tipping in Andrei Svechnikov's centering pass in front, immediately turned and skated toward his teammate to hug him in the right circle. John Wawrow, Star Tribune, "Aho leads Hurricanes to 3-2 win over Rangers in NHL's return," 1 Aug. 2020 Camilla had previously revealed during that the most difficult thing about being in isolation was not being able to hug her grandkids. Victoria Murphy, Town & Country, "Prince Charles, Princess Anne, and Prince William Carry Out First Public Visits After Months of Video Calls," 16 June 2020 Toss your covers aside, bend your knees, bring them to your chest and hug them close to your body with your arms. Kelsey Hurwitz, Woman's Day, "18 Ways to Relax That Will Leave You Feeling Like a New Woman," 29 May 2020 When grandparents can hug their grandchildren without fear of getting sick. Alex Burness, The Denver Post, "Colorado Gov. Jared Polis extends statewide stay-at-home order to April 26," 6 Apr. 2020 My first thought was that my child would not be able to hug his immunocompromised grandparents for the foreseeable future. Adam Weinstein, The New Republic, "The Republicans Take America on a Death March," 8 July 2020 Can’t bring books or medicine, can’t hug the children. Mitch Albom, Detroit Free Press, "Mitch Albom: Shunned by other countries, we long for the day to expand our horizons again," 21 June 2020 Protesters rushed forward to hug him, a show of appreciation for his support of the movement against police violence that has swept the nation. Reese Oxner, Dallas News, "After night of looting and destruction, Arlington protest remains peaceful," 2 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hug.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hug

Verb

1567, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1659, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for hug

Verb

perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse hugga to soothe

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Learn More about hug

Statistics for hug

Last Updated

13 Aug 2020

Cite this Entry

“Hug.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hug. Accessed 15 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for hug

hug

verb
How to pronounce hug (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of hug

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to put your arms around someone especially as a way of showing love or friendship
: to hold (something) tightly with your arms
: to stay close to (something)

hug

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hug (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of putting your arms around someone or something as a way of showing love or friendship

hug

verb
\ ˈhəg How to pronounce hug (audio) \
hugged; hugging

Kids Definition of hug

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to clasp in the arms : embrace
2 : to keep close to The ship hugged the coast.

hug

noun

Kids Definition of hug (Entry 2 of 2)

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More from Merriam-Webster on hug

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for hug

Spanish Central: Translation of hug

Nglish: Translation of hug for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hug for Arabic Speakers

Comments on hug

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