involve

verb
in·​volve | \ in-ˈvälv How to pronounce involve (audio) , -ˈvȯlv also -ˈväv or -ˈvȯv \
involved; involving

Definition of involve

transitive verb

1a : to engage as a participant workers involved in building a house
b : to oblige to take part right of Congress to involve the nation in war
c : to occupy (someone, such as oneself) absorbingly especially : to commit (someone) emotionally was involved with a married man
2a : to have within or as part of itself : include
b : to require as a necessary accompaniment : entail
c : affect entry 1 the cancer involved the lymph nodes
3 : to relate closely : connect
4 : to surround as if with a wrapping : envelop
5 archaic : to enfold or envelop so as to encumber
6 archaic : to wind, coil, or wreathe about

Other Words from involve

involver noun

Synonyms for involve

Synonyms

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include, comprehend, embrace, involve mean to contain within as part of the whole. include suggests the containment of something as a constituent, component, or subordinate part of a larger whole. the price of dinner includes dessert comprehend implies that something comes within the scope of a statement or definition. his system comprehends all history embrace implies a gathering of separate items within a whole. her faith embraces both Christian and non-Christian beliefs involve suggests inclusion by virtue of the nature of the whole, whether by being its natural or inevitable consequence. the new job involves a lot of detail

Examples of involve in a Sentence

He told us a story involving life on a farm. She remained involved with the organization for many years. Renovating the house involved hiring a contractor. The disease continued to spread until it involved the entire jaw.
Recent Examples on the Web Invest in productivity tools that are reliable and user-friendly, and involve the team in selecting the tools. Ivan Ong, Forbes, 1 Aug. 2022 Golf long has struggled to put together a Hall of Fame that would be in line with Cooperstown (baseball) and Canton (pro football), in part because its roots involve more than one organization. Fox News, 20 July 2022 Conley found no law or rule required Blank to involve Doe in her decision about Cephus' reinstatement. Bruce Vielmetti, Journal Sentinel, 19 July 2022 It’s the reason some coaches would still be hesitant or unwilling to involve the team in any sort of religious activity. Luca Evans, Los Angeles Times, 29 June 2022 SFNext aims to involve city residents in finding solutions to some of San Francisco’s most pressing problems. Audrey Brown, San Francisco Chronicle, 15 June 2022 The museum helped with the Clotilda research and in finding ways to involve Africatown's residents in preserving the ship’s memory, as well as the legacy of slavery and freedom in Alabama. Laura Kiniry, Smithsonian Magazine, 3 June 2022 That episode winds up coming full circle to involve Saul and Caprice in a stunt that will put their competitors (a dervish-dancing man who has sprouted multiple ears; a woman who mutilates herself for the delectation of the elite) to shame. Ann Hornaday, Washington Post, 1 June 2022 Wilson says such injuries often involve muscle spasms and micro-tears in your ligaments. Kendall K. Morgan, Fortune, 31 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'involve.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of involve

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 5

History and Etymology for involve

Middle English envolven, involven "to cloud (with obscurities), envelop (in darkness, vice), encumber, surround," borrowed from Latin involvere "to move by rolling, roll back on itself, enclose in a covering, wrap up" (Medieval Latin, "to envelop [in tears, shadows], engage in an affair or occupation, implicate, ensnare"), from in- in- entry 2 + volvere "to set in a circular course, cause to roll, bring round" — more at wallow entry 2

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Time Traveler for involve

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The first known use of involve was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near involve

involution

involve

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Last Updated

5 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Involve.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/involve. Accessed 8 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for involve

involve

verb
in·​volve | \ in-ˈvälv How to pronounce involve (audio) , -ˈvȯlv \
involved; involving

Kids Definition of involve

1 : to draw into a situation : engage The teacher involved her students in the project.
2 : to take part in I'm not involved in the planning.
3 : include The accident involved three cars.
4 : to be accompanied by The plan involves some risk.
5 : to have or take the attention of completely He was deeply involved in his work.

Other Words from involve

involvement \ -​mənt \ noun

involve

transitive verb
in·​volve | \ in-ˈvälv, -ˈvȯlv also -ˈväv or -ˈvȯv \
involved; involving

Medical Definition of involve

: to affect with a disease or condition : include in an area of damage, trauma, or insult all the bones of the skull were involved in the proliferative process herpes involved the trigeminal nerve severely involved patients were isolated lacerations involved the muscles

More from Merriam-Webster on involve

Nglish: Translation of involve for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of involve for Arabic Speakers

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