attract

verb
at·​tract | \ ə-ˈtrakt \
attracted; attracting; attracts

Definition of attract

transitive verb

: to cause to approach or adhere: such as
a : to pull to or draw toward oneself or itself A magnet attracts iron.
b : to draw by appeal to natural or excited interest, emotion, or aesthetic sense : entice attract attention The museum attracts visitors.

intransitive verb

: to exercise attraction Opposites attract.

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Other Words from attract

attractor \ -​ˈtrak-​tər \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for attract

attract, allure, charm, captivate, fascinate, enchant mean to draw another by exerting a powerful influence. attract applies to any degree or kind of ability to exert influence over another. students attracted by the school's locale allure implies an enticing by what is fair, pleasing, or seductive. an alluring smile charm implies the power of casting a spell over the person or thing affected and so compelling a response charmed by their hospitality , but it may, like captivate, suggest no more than evoking delight or admiration. her performances captivated audiences fascinate suggests a magical influence and tends to stress the ineffectiveness of attempts to resist. a story that continues to fascinate children enchant is perhaps the strongest of these terms in stressing the appeal of the agent and the degree of delight evoked in the subject. hopelessly enchanted by her beauty

Examples of attract in a Sentence

The company has a difficult time attracting good employees because of its poor pay and benefits. The chance to travel around the world attracted me to a career as a flight attendant. The museum attracts visitors from all over the world. The scent will attract certain insects. Certain insects are attracted by the scent. Her bright blue eyes attracted me. The bird's colorful feathers are used to attract a mate.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Across the West, a thriving economy has attracted businesses and workers, drawn in part to the region’s natural beauty and outdoor ethic. Scott Wilson, The Seattle Times, "Once flat and wide on the frontier, Western cityscapes are now rising tall and sleek," 4 Feb. 2019 Beijing has been trying to attract more foreign capital to fill in the gap. Nathaniel Taplin, WSJ, "The China Story That Is Far Bigger Than Apple," 4 Jan. 2019 The firm’s designs—and most notably, its custom kitchens—have attracted a clientele that includes Loro Piana, the late architect Renzo Mongiardino, and the late Gianni Agnelli. Maria Shollenbarger, ELLE Decor, "An Italian Design Firm Transforms Discreet-but-Luxe Kitchens with a Timeless Florentine Aesthetic," 18 Oct. 2018 Through the years, Bella has attracted quite the audience all while achieving A-list status. Maxwell Losgar, Teen Vogue, "Bella Thorne's Fashion Transformation," 9 Oct. 2018 The mission has also attracted the attention and support of Briggs & Stratton, the world’s largest manufacturer of small engines. Roy Berendsohn, Popular Mechanics, "The Zen of Mowing for Someone Who Needs It," 1 Oct. 2018 The battle between Porter and Walters, who says her Democratic foe is way too liberal for the SoCal district, has attracted big money and could be a fight to the November finish. Celeste Katz, Glamour, "In a Record-Breaking Election Year for Women, Here Are the Races to Watch," 17 Sep. 2018 The service attracted some users who don’t want to rely on the dominant local player, Baidu, which holds a 70% market share. Yoko Kubota, WSJ, "Microsoft’s Bing Search-Engine Service Interrupted in China," 24 Jan. 2019 His work attracted moderate attention— a successful blood transfusion was made using his work in New York in 1907, a far cry from the milk days. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "What Different Blood Types Mean (And How To Find Out Yours)," 28 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'attract.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of attract

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for attract

Middle English, from Latin attractus, past participle of attrahere, from ad- + trahere to pull, draw

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Statistics for attract

Last Updated

10 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for attract

The first known use of attract was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for attract

attract

verb

English Language Learners Definition of attract

: to cause (someone) to choose to do or be involved in something
: to cause (someone) to like or be interested in something
: to cause (someone or something) to go to or move to or toward a place

attract

verb
at·​tract | \ ə-ˈtrakt \
attracted; attracting

Kids Definition of attract

1 : to draw by appealing to interest or feeling I guess we must've been talking pretty loud, because…we attracted a crowd. — Jeff Kinney, Wimpy Kid
2 : to draw to or toward something else A magnet attracts iron.

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More from Merriam-Webster on attract

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with attract

Spanish Central: Translation of attract

Nglish: Translation of attract for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of attract for Arabic Speakers

Comments on attract

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