allure

verb
al·lure | \ə-ˈlu̇r \
allured; alluring

Definition of allure 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to entice by charm or attraction … I had been fool enough to allow myself to be so quickly allured by her charms …— Anthony Trollope

allure

noun

Definition of allure (Entry 2 of 2)

: power of attraction or fascination : charm the allure of fame rare books that hold a special allure for collectors

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Other Words from allure

Verb

allurement \-ˈlu̇r-mənt \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for allure

Verb

attract, allure, charm, captivate, fascinate, enchant mean to draw another by exerting a powerful influence. attract applies to any degree or kind of ability to exert influence over another. students attracted by the school's locale allure implies an enticing by what is fair, pleasing, or seductive. an alluring smile charm implies the power of casting a spell over the person or thing affected and so compelling a response charmed by their hospitality , but it may, like captivate, suggest no more than evoking delight or admiration. her performances captivated audiences fascinate suggests a magical influence and tends to stress the ineffectiveness of attempts to resist. a story that continues to fascinate children enchant is perhaps the strongest of these terms in stressing the appeal of the agent and the degree of delight evoked in the subject. hopelessly enchanted by her beauty

Examples of allure in a Sentence

Verb

was so allured by his sister's college roommate that before long he was asking her for a date allured by the promise of big bucks, he decided to have a go at a job on the trading floor of the stock market

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Building a horse racing empire in a market as large as China is alluring. Melissa Hoppert And Alexandra Stevenson, New York Times, "China Horse Club Makes a Run for the Roses," 4 May 2018 The idea of a move will no doubt be alluring to Quina - though it could be argued that the chance to play in the English top flight is the biggest pulling force of them all. SI.com, "Ajax and AC Milan Keeping Tabs on Exciting West Ham Youngster Ahead of Potential Summer Move," 18 Apr. 2018 America, Min could see, was alluring to her mother. Junot Díaz, The New Yorker, "A Flawless Silence," 17 Apr. 2018 The promise of the Fuze is alluring: a single payment card-sized device that electronically stores data for dozens of other cards. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Whatever you do, don’t give this programmable payment card to your waiter," 10 Apr. 2018 Loyola Chicago’s 98-year-old chaplain, allured a larger crowd than any coach, player, Brunson or even Oscar Robertson. Carter Karels, San Antonio Express-News, "Wagner’s heritage, Sister Jean’s presser highlight day as Final Four decends on San Antonio," 30 Mar. 2018 The autonomous lifestyle is alluring for its adventure and independence, but becoming a full-time freelancer is not without its challenges. Micah Iverson, USA TODAY, "How do you know when to go freelance full-time?," 20 Feb. 2018 Indulge in all things prim, proper—and positively alluring all throughout the year. Rachel Waldman, Vogue, "How to Live Every Day Like It’s Valentine’s Day," 30 Jan. 2018 Maher purchased a minority share of the New York Mets in 2012, and the opportunity to invest in the franchise was alluring for two reasons. Justin Barrasso, SI.com, "Bill Maher discusses the Patriots, Roger Goodell and the George Steinbrenner-Donald Trump Connection," 19 Jan. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Stan Natonek, physics teacher at Richards High School, explained the science behind the aesthetic allure of the setting sun’s spectacle. Donna Vickroy, Daily Southtown, "People gather at waterfronts to watch the sun set on the Southland," 11 July 2018 Esports has long struggled to to reconcile its grassroots base with the allure of stadiums and broadcast finals, and sometimes the scrying light of greater viewership illuminates things that had been left in the shadows. Eric Van Allen, WIRED, "Live on ESPN: Is Esports Finally Ready for Its Crossover Moment?," 11 July 2018 Part of the allure of being in the military was the availability of small warplanes. Bonnie L. Cook, Philly.com, "Harry L. Thomas, 99, Philly surgeon and teacher," 9 July 2018 But the allure of Worthington Manor goes beyond the golf itself. Brent Kennedy, Howard County Times, "Worthington Manor Golf Club," 29 June 2018 Part of the allure is the opportunity a private island presents to cut oneself off from the world, and sometimes even from technology. Olivia Lee, WSJ, "Hidden Pleasures on Private Isles," 19 June 2018 After eight surgeries in nine years, Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce is no stranger to the toxic allure of opioid pain medications. Aaron Randle, kansascity, "Travis Kelce has a new game plan — for opioid addiction," 11 June 2018 Supercomputers have lost some of their allure in the era of cloud computing and humongous data centers. Tom Simonite, WIRED, "The US Again Has World’s Most Powerful Supercomputer," 8 June 2018 Some do it well, some less so, but the familiarity of the format is part of its allure. Dominic Armato, azcentral, "Helio Basin Brewing Co. brings Arizona cuisine to Phoenix brewery, but fascinating menu feels out of place," 6 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'allure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of allure

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1534, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for allure

Verb

Middle English aluren, from Middle French alurer, from Old French, from a- (from Latin ad-) + lure, leure lure — more at lure

Noun

see allure entry 1

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Dictionary Entries near allure

allulose

all up

all-up weight

allure

allurer

alluring

allusion

Statistics for allure

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for allure

The first known use of allure was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for allure

allure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of allure

: power to attract : a quality that attracts people

allure

verb
al·lure | \ə-ˈlu̇r \
allured; alluring

Kids Definition of allure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to try to attract or influence by offering what seems to be a benefit or pleasure Treasure hunters were allured by stories of lost riches.

allure

noun

Kids Definition of allure (Entry 2 of 2)

: power to attract the allure of fame

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Comments on allure

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