allure

verb
al·​lure | \ ə-ˈlu̇r How to pronounce allure (audio) \
allured; alluring

Definition of allure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to entice by charm or attraction … I had been fool enough to allow myself to be so quickly allured by her charms …— Anthony Trollope

allure

noun

Definition of allure (Entry 2 of 2)

: power of attraction or fascination : charm the allure of fame rare books that hold a special allure for collectors

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Other Words from allure

Verb

allurement \ ə-​ˈlu̇r-​mənt How to pronounce allure (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for allure

Verb

attract, allure, charm, captivate, fascinate, enchant mean to draw another by exerting a powerful influence. attract applies to any degree or kind of ability to exert influence over another. students attracted by the school's locale allure implies an enticing by what is fair, pleasing, or seductive. an alluring smile charm implies the power of casting a spell over the person or thing affected and so compelling a response charmed by their hospitality , but it may, like captivate, suggest no more than evoking delight or admiration. her performances captivated audiences fascinate suggests a magical influence and tends to stress the ineffectiveness of attempts to resist. a story that continues to fascinate children enchant is perhaps the strongest of these terms in stressing the appeal of the agent and the degree of delight evoked in the subject. hopelessly enchanted by her beauty

Examples of allure in a Sentence

Verb was so allured by his sister's college roommate that before long he was asking her for a date allured by the promise of big bucks, he decided to have a go at a job on the trading floor of the stock market
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The result is a heady and seductive fragrance with woody undertones, sure to allure and entice. Grooming Playbook, The Salt Lake Tribune, 11 May 2022 Hurricane Creek Wilderness, Arkansas Boulders, bluffs, and waterfalls abound in the 15,214-acre Hurricane Creek Wilderness, where high ridges and gurgling creeks allure intrepid trekkers. Stephanie Vermillion, Outside Online, 26 July 2021 For students of style, the Copland film—showing men wearing coats, ties, and hats even when going about their casual rounds—offers alluring hints of everyday formality. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, 11 Apr. 2020 The offers are alluring to owners who often operate on the edge and are strapped for cash. Gretchen Morgenson, NBC News, 3 Apr. 2020 Her music, nor her brand, are flashy, with Coles instead settling into a career marked by sophisticated, sensual and inventive electronic music that allures whether heard in a sweaty club, a major festival or simply through your headphones. Katie Bain, Billboard, 17 Jan. 2020 Bass-baritone Plachetka managed to produce a resplendent timbre while oozing the charisma and guile that make Figaro so alluring a character. Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, 29 Sep. 2019 The smell is alive and dead, asphyxiating and alluring all at once. BostonGlobe.com, 15 Dec. 2019 Many of those automakers will be able to take advantage of alluring tax incentives that are now being phased out for Tesla because of its head start in the field. Michael Liedtke, USA TODAY, 26 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Indeed, the allure of flexibility in Silicon Valley is too strong a pull for several Goldman employees on the tech side. Amiah Taylor, Fortune, 11 May 2022 Hassan felt the allure of UConn was too hard to pass up. Shreyas Laddha, Hartford Courant, 11 May 2022 The allure is still there, and teams deep in the hunt would be crazy to not consider swinging big for an immense upgrade. Morten Jensen, Forbes, 24 Apr. 2022 Others thought the allure of Yao, a 7-foot-6 specimen with a feathery shooting touch, was too tantalizing to pass up. Rahat Huq, Chron, 11 Apr. 2022 At the end of the Cold War, a segment of foreign policy experts and intellectuals on the right were warning that the allure of peace was too dangerous, that the post-Cold War era was a moment that could not last forever. Shay Khatiri, The Week, 26 Mar. 2022 The allure of bringing in a top-eight quarterback such as Watson was simply too much for Haslam to pass up. Ben Volin, BostonGlobe.com, 19 Mar. 2022 With the potential to become a major port of passage for the ever-growing digital assets space, just as Silicon Valley has been for big tech and New York has been for big banking, the allure of creating a crypto capital in the U.S. is obvious. Declan Harty, Fortune, 15 Mar. 2022 Armstrong said the allure of playing basketball abroad and seeing other parts of the world are also draws, even in politically repressive countries like Russia. NBC News, 8 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'allure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of allure

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1534, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for allure

Verb and Noun

Middle English aluren, from Middle French alurer, from Old French, from a- (from Latin ad-) + lure, leure lure — more at lure

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Learn More About allure

Time Traveler for allure

Time Traveler

The first known use of allure was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near allure

all-up weight

allure

allurer

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Statistics for allure

Last Updated

16 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Allure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allure. Accessed 22 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for allure

allure

verb
al·​lure | \ ə-ˈlu̇r How to pronounce allure (audio) \
allured; alluring

Kids Definition of allure

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to try to attract or influence by offering what seems to be a benefit or pleasure Treasure hunters were allured by stories of lost riches.

allure

noun

Kids Definition of allure (Entry 2 of 2)

: power to attract the allure of fame

More from Merriam-Webster on allure

Nglish: Translation of allure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of allure for Arabic Speakers

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