enchant

verb
en·chant | \ in-ˈchant , en- \
enchanted; enchanting; enchants

Definition of enchant 

transitive verb

1 : to influence by or as if by charms and incantation : bewitch

2 : to attract and move deeply : rouse to ecstatic admiration the scene enchanted her to the point of tears —Elinor Wylie

Keep scrolling for more

Choose the Right Synonym for enchant

attract, allure, charm, captivate, fascinate, enchant mean to draw another by exerting a powerful influence. attract applies to any degree or kind of ability to exert influence over another. students attracted by the school's locale allure implies an enticing by what is fair, pleasing, or seductive. an alluring smile charm implies the power of casting a spell over the person or thing affected and so compelling a response charmed by their hospitality , but it may, like captivate, suggest no more than evoking delight or admiration. her performances captivated audiences fascinate suggests a magical influence and tends to stress the ineffectiveness of attempts to resist. a story that continues to fascinate children enchant is perhaps the strongest of these terms in stressing the appeal of the agent and the degree of delight evoked in the subject. hopelessly enchanted by her beauty

Examples of enchant in a Sentence

The book has enchanted children for almost a century. The beauty of the place enchants.

Recent Examples on the Web

With Fourth of July revelry reaching its apex, and Paris Couture Week continuing to enchant on and off the runway, this week's best beauty moments were a study in how to survive—and embrace—the balmy weather. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "The 10 Best Beauty Looks: Week of July 8, 2018," 10 July 2018 The challenge now is to find ways to resist royalist escapism and instead to recommit to the radical majesty of the egalitarian project, re-enchanting the everyday. Heather Souvaine Horn, The New Republic, "Donald Trump, Meghan Markle, and America’s enduring obsession with the British royals," 12 July 2018 Explore Gardner’s enchanting home with a drink in hand (there’s a cash bar), and try whimsical, hands-on activities inspired by current exhibits (a recent night included a calligraphy station). BostonGlobe.com, "30 great dates in Boston and beyond," 22 Mar. 2018 Admired then for its refined culture, massive architecture, and ingenious complex of dams and water channels, Petra is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site that enchants visitors from all corners of the globe. Jim Berkeley, Town & Country, "How to Plan a Trip to Jordan," 5 Oct. 2016 Nearly 750,000 travelers pass through the building each day, and a series of more recent renovations have strived to keep the space usable while maintaining the grandeur and light so key to the original design that so enchanted the public. Angela Serratore, Smithsonian, "The Preservation Battle of Grand Central," 26 June 2018 Mr López Obrador, who has run for the presidency twice before, has a folksy air of incorruptibility that enchants many Mexicans. The Economist, "AMLO, Mexico’s answer to Donald Trump," 23 June 2018 Quick aside: Hearing a parade of more than 100 soccer aficionados, golf moms and lawyers enchanted by the sound of their own voice repeating themselves and ignoring their 2-minute time limits -- this was never, ever on my career bucket list. Greg Cote, miamiherald, "David Beckham confronts his biggest fight yet to (finally) bring MLS soccer to Miami," 12 July 2018 This weekly pop-up is clearly enchanted, but a lot of that owes to the simple superiority of eating tacos on the street. Mike Sula, Chicago Reader, "Chicago's taco game is strong: these 3 spots prove the taqueria, if nothing else, abides," 27 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'enchant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of enchant

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for enchant

Middle English, from Anglo-French enchanter, from Latin incantare, from in- + cantare to sing — more at chant

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about enchant

Statistics for enchant

Last Updated

20 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for enchant

The first known use of enchant was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for enchant

enchant

verb

English Language Learners Definition of enchant

: to attract and hold the attention of (someone) by being interesting, pretty, etc.

: to put a magic spell on (someone or something)

enchant

verb
en·chant | \ in-ˈchant \
enchanted; enchanting

Kids Definition of enchant

1 : to put under a spell by or as if by magic : bewitch … the Wicked Witch enchanted my axe … —L. Frank Baum, The Wizard of Oz

2 : to please greatly : delight The story enchanted us.

Other words from enchant

enchantment \-mənt \ noun

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on enchant

What made you want to look up enchant? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

by word of mouth

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Food Quiz

True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!