seduce

verb
se·​duce | \ si-ˈdüs How to pronounce seduce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
seduced; seducing

Definition of seduce

transitive verb

1 : to persuade to disobedience or disloyalty
2 : to lead astray usually by persuasion or false promises
3 : to carry out the physical seduction of : entice to sexual intercourse
4 : attract

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Other Words from seduce

seducer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for seduce

lure, entice, inveigle, decoy, tempt, seduce mean to lead astray from one's true course. lure implies a drawing into danger, evil, or difficulty through attracting and deceiving. lured naive investors with get-rich-quick schemes entice suggests drawing by artful or adroit means. advertising designed to entice new customers inveigle implies enticing by cajoling or flattering. fund-raisers inveigling wealthy alumni decoy implies a luring into entrapment by artifice. attempting to decoy the enemy into an ambush tempt implies the presenting of an attraction so strong that it overcomes the restraints of conscience or better judgment. tempted by the offer of money seduce implies a leading astray by persuasion or false promises. seduced by assurances of assistance

Examples of seduce in a Sentence

He tried to seduce her. She was seduced by an older man. The other team seduced him with a better offer.
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Recent Examples on the Web

But even conscience is wavering and easily seduced, a temporary fix at best. Marilynne Robinson, Harper's magazine, "Is Poverty Necessary?," 10 June 2019 John Washburn’s Balinese teak wood tables can’t seduce you inside the Sullivan. Amy Drew Thompson, orlandosentinel.com, "Slainté! Sanfording at The Sullivan is trad and true ... and pretty tasty," 4 June 2019 The Wagner Manufacturing Company’s Magnalite kettle was never meant to be merely a vessel for boiling water; it was created to seduce you. Ruth Reichl, Town & Country, "The Magnalite Tea Kettle Is the Design World's Favorite Kitchen Gadget," 14 Mar. 2019 The crowd couldn’t help but cheer as Matcha expressed unbridled energy, and Schisandra Berry seduced the evening’s emcee. Ella Riley-adams, Vogue, "Dada Daily Throws a Surrealist Dinner at One of New York’s Most Resplendent Apartments," 30 Mar. 2019 Yet shows like The Tudors and Wolf Hall depict her as cunning and scorned, a woman who seduced her dead husband’s brother, who deserves to whither and die alone as a young, virile Henry VIII chases Anne Boleyn. Julie Kosin, Harper's BAZAAR, "The First Teaser Trailer for," 25 Jan. 2019 The movies, which used to aim to seduce, today seem bent on the brutalization of the spectator. John Banville, WSJ, "‘Sleeping With Strangers’ Review: Flickers of Desire," 22 Feb. 2019 Skarsgård looks great, however, and that goes double (triple) for Florence Pugh, who plays Charlie Ross, a bohemian English actress recruited (unwittingly, at first) to seduce and disrupt the terrorists. Taylor Antrim, Vogue, "Escape at Dannemora and The Little Drummer Girl Put the Prestige in Prestige TV," 16 Nov. 2018 Actually, the man in the song hopes to seduce, not rape; the song is flirty and humorous, a spoof of the endless drama between men and women. Peggy Noonan, WSJ, "Baby, There’s a Chilling Effect Outside," 3 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'seduce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of seduce

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for seduce

Late Latin seducere, from Latin, to lead away, from se- apart + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Dictionary Entries near seduce

sedjadeh

Sedna

sedra

seduce

seducee

seducement

seducible

Statistics for seduce

Last Updated

21 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for seduce

The first known use of seduce was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for seduce

seduce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of seduce

: to persuade (someone) to have sex with you
: to persuade (someone) to do something

seduce

verb
se·​duce | \ si-ˈdüs How to pronounce seduce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
seduced; seducing

Kids Definition of seduce

: to persuade (someone) to do something and especially to do something wrong She was seduced into crime.

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More from Merriam-Webster on seduce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for seduce

Spanish Central: Translation of seduce

Nglish: Translation of seduce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of seduce for Arabic Speakers

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