endure

verb
en·​dure | \ in-ˈdu̇r How to pronounce endure (audio) , -ˈdyu̇r, en- \
endured; enduring

Definition of endure

intransitive verb

1 : to continue in the same state : last entry 1 the style endured for centuries
2 : to remain firm under suffering or misfortune without yielding though it is difficult, we must endure

transitive verb

1 : to undergo especially without giving in : suffer endure hardships endured great pain
2 : to regard with acceptance or tolerance could not endure noisy children

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Choose the Right Synonym for endure

bear, suffer, endure, abide, tolerate, stand mean to put up with something trying or painful. bear usually implies the power to sustain without flinching or breaking. forced to bear a tragic loss suffer often suggests acceptance or passivity rather than courage or patience in bearing. suffering many insults endure implies continuing firm or resolute through trials and difficulties. endured years of rejection abide suggests acceptance without resistance or protest. cannot abide their rudeness tolerate suggests overcoming or successfully controlling an impulse to resist, avoid, or resent something injurious or distasteful. refused to tolerate such treatment stand emphasizes even more strongly the ability to bear without discomposure or flinching. unable to stand teasing

continue, last, endure, abide, persist mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely. continue applies to a process going on without ending. the search for peace will continue last, especially when unqualified, may stress existing beyond what is normal or expected. buy shoes that will last endure adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies. in spite of everything, her faith endured abide implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability. a love that abides through 40 years of marriage persist suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness. the sense of guilt persisted

Examples of endure in a Sentence

She wants to make sure her legacy will endure. He endured five years as a prisoner of war. We endured the lecture for as long as we could.
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Recent Examples on the Web Part of Evans-Pritchard’s enduring appeal is his style. Adam Kuper, WSJ, "‘The Anthropological Lens’ Review: A Dandy Among the Azande," 20 Mar. 2020 Many people spoke of a coup, but there was enduring disagreement over whether it had been perpetrated by Morales or by his opponents. Jon Lee Anderson, The New Yorker, "The Fall of Evo Morales," 16 Mar. 2020 The new film also reflects Diao’s enduring fascination with the struggle between eros and death. Jiwei Xiao, The New York Review of Books, "Into the Uncharted Zone: Diao Yinan’s ‘The Wild Goose Lake’," 14 Mar. 2020 Van’s thank you for Bessemer’s enduring support is the Bob Sykes BBQ and Blues Festival, which celebrates its 11th year in April. Eric Velasco, al, "Where are Birmingham’s oldest restaurants?," 12 Mar. 2020 Once again, Biden’s enduring strength with African-American voters proved key. Philip Elliott, Time, "Joe Biden's Win in Michigan Gives Him a Clear Path to the Democratic Nomination," 11 Mar. 2020 Future Forward’s politicians have spoken out against the military’s enduring influence on Thai politics and have called for the defense budget to be slashed. Hannah Beech, New York Times, "Thailand Court Disbands Popular Opposition Party," 21 Feb. 2020 The song also elevated Slade to a musical immortality, placing them alongside the few artists to have achieved the ubiquitous, enduring relevance that only a Christmas hit can provide. Rob Picheta, CNN, "Writing a Christmas hit is big business -- but most artists fall short," 20 Dec. 2019 From the dairy barns to the cranberry bogs, farmers have endured sinking commodities prices and miserable weather that’s resulted in some just now finishing last year’s corn harvest. Rick Barrett, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Wisconsin farmers, hit with a flurry of punches, seek long-term solutions," 6 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'endure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of endure

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for endure

Middle English, from Anglo-French endurer, from Vulgar Latin *indurare, from Latin, to harden, from in- + durare to harden, endure — more at during

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Learn More about endure

Time Traveler for endure

Time Traveler

The first known use of endure was in the 14th century

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Statistics for endure

Last Updated

24 Mar 2020

Cite this Entry

“Endure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/endure. Accessed 1 Apr. 2020.

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More Definitions for endure

endure

verb
How to pronounce endure (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of endure

: to continue to exist in the same state or condition
: to experience (pain or suffering) for a long time
: to deal with or accept (something unpleasant)

endure

verb
en·​dure | \ in-ˈdu̇r How to pronounce endure (audio) , -ˈdyu̇r \
endured; enduring

Kids Definition of endure

1 : to continue to exist over a long time : last This tradition has endured for centuries.
2 : to experience without giving in They had to endure hardship to survive.
3 : to put up with He could not endure another minute of waiting.

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More from Merriam-Webster on endure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for endure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with endure

Spanish Central: Translation of endure

Nglish: Translation of endure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of endure for Arabic Speakers

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