continue

verb
con·​tin·​ue | \ kən-ˈtin-(ˌ)yü How to pronounce continue (audio) \
continued; continuing

Definition of continue

intransitive verb

1 : to maintain without interruption a condition, course, or action The boat continued downstream.
2 : to remain in existence : endure The tradition continues to this day.
3 : to remain in a place or condition : stay We cannot continue here much longer.
4 : to resume an activity after interruption We'll continue after lunch.

transitive verb

1a : keep up, maintain continues walking
b : to keep going or add to : prolong continue the battle also : to resume after intermission
2 : to cause to continue chose not to continue her subscription
3 : to allow to remain in a place or condition : retain The trustees were continued.
4 : to postpone (a legal proceeding) by a continuance

Other Words from continue

continuer \ kən-​ˈtin-​yü-​ər How to pronounce continue (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for continue

continue, last, endure, abide, persist mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely. continue applies to a process going on without ending. the search for peace will continue last, especially when unqualified, may stress existing beyond what is normal or expected. buy shoes that will last endure adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies. in spite of everything, her faith endured abide implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability. a love that abides through 40 years of marriage persist suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness. the sense of guilt persisted

Examples of continue in a Sentence

The team will continue with their drills until the coach is satisfied with their performance. The world's population continues to grow. The traditions will continue only as long as the next generations keep them alive. The good weather continued for several days. The lecture continued for another hour after we left. Exit the highway, take a right off the ramp, then continue down the street until you get to the first traffic light. Continue along this path until you come to the end. The plot gets more and more intricate as the story continues. See More
Recent Examples on the Web The surgeon faced a dilemma: continue an operation that could kill an extremely sick patient on the operating table or sew the patient up, extending their life by only a few painful days at most. Elizabeth Chuck, NBC News, 7 May 2022 For Ukraine to succeed in this next phase of war its international partners, including the U.S., must continue to demonstrate our unity and our resolve to keep the weapons and ammunition flowing to Ukraine, without interruption. Adam Sabes, Fox News, 7 May 2022 Winds continue to blow around 10 to 15 mph, out of the east and northeast. Washington Post, 7 May 2022 His life has changed so much for the better in less than three years, but he’ll clearly be disappointed if, in three years more, that rapid change and ascent in the motorsports world doesn’t continue. Nathan Brown, The Indianapolis Star, 7 May 2022 Gable said as California enters a future much hotter and drier than anyone has experienced before, officials and residents need to rethink the way water is managed across the board, otherwise the state will continue to be unprepared. Rachel Ramirez, CNN, 7 May 2022 Her testimony will continue May 16 once the trial — which has already stretched on for four weeks — resumes after a one-week break. Matthew Barakat, ajc, 7 May 2022 European companies continue to do most mergers and acquisitions at home, but over the past few years, the number of U.S. acquisitions by European firms has risen, according to research group Dealogic. William Boston, WSJ, 7 May 2022 Repair work will continue to be done in the Mount Union area. Amaris Encinas, The Arizona Republic, 7 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'continue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of continue

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for continue

Middle English continuen "to persist, persevere, last, postpone (a hearing or trial)," borrowed from Anglo-French continuer, borrowed from Latin continuāre "to make continuous, extend in space, keep on with," verbal derivative of continuus "uninterrupted, continuous

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Time Traveler for continue

Time Traveler

The first known use of continue was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near continue

continuator

continue

continued

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Statistics for continue

Last Updated

10 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Continue.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/continue. Accessed 19 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for continue

continue

verb
con·​tin·​ue | \ kən-ˈtin-yü How to pronounce continue (audio) \
continued; continuing

Kids Definition of continue

1 : to do or cause to do the same thing without changing or stopping The weather continued hot and sunny.
2 : to begin again after stopping After you left, I continued working.

continue

transitive verb
con·​tin·​ue
continued; continuing

Legal Definition of continue

: to postpone (a legal proceeding) to a future day

More from Merriam-Webster on continue

Nglish: Translation of continue for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of continue for Arabic Speakers

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