assure

verb
as·​sure | \ ə-ˈshu̇r How to pronounce assure (audio) \
assured; assuring

Definition of assure

transitive verb

1 : to make sure or certain : convince glancing back to assure himself no one was following
2 : to inform positively I assure you that we can do it.
3 : to make certain the coming or attainment of : guarantee worked hard to assure accuracy
4 : to make safe (as from risks or against overthrow) : insure assured the security of the country
5 : to give confidence to And hereby we know that we are of the truth, and shall assure our hearts … — 1 John 3:19 (King James Version)

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Synonyms & Antonyms for assure

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for assure

ensure, insure, assure, secure mean to make a thing or person sure. ensure, insure, and assure are interchangeable in many contexts where they indicate the making certain or inevitable of an outcome, but ensure may imply a virtual guarantee the government has ensured the safety of the refugees , while insure sometimes stresses the taking of necessary measures beforehand careful planning should insure the success of the party , and assure distinctively implies the removal of doubt and suspense from a person's mind. I assure you that no harm will be done secure implies action taken to guard against attack or loss. sent reinforcements to secure their position

Examples of assure in a Sentence

I can assure you that you won't be disappointed. a minister choosing just the right words to assure the grieving parents of the fallen soldier
Recent Examples on the Web Even though Democrats now control both chambers, most legislation will still need to clear a 60-vote threshold to assure final passage in the Senate, and bipartisan support for his initiatives will therefore be crucial to ensure their passage. Lanhee J. Chen, CNN, "If Biden wants to fix health care, he will need Republicans," 30 Apr. 2021 With the virus still active, other adjustments were made to assure everyone's safety. Tom Withers, Star Tribune, "Hello, Cleveland: NFL takes 'blended' draft back on road," 27 Apr. 2021 The question is: How can government better link payment to quality and assure the money goes to those facilities that will use it to enhance care, not boost their bottom line. Howard Gleckman, Forbes, "Biden Begins An Important, Much-Delayed, National Debate About Long-Term Care Reform," 8 Apr. 2021 In Houston, Legacy Restaurants — which owns the Original Ninfa’s and Antone’s Famous Po’ Boys — is running two vaccine drives for all staff members and their spouses, moves the owners believe will protect workers and assure customers. Jennifer Steinhauer, New York Times, "Masks Off, Mahi Mahi On. Restaurant Workers Are in a Race for Vaccines," 7 Apr. 2021 These exhibitions are like a dry run for the River Cats, who’ll use their staff to sell tickets, run concessions and assure protocols are followed. John Shea, San Francisco Chronicle, "Giants, A's minor-leaguers to play exhibitions; fans permitted in Sacramento," 4 Apr. 2021 The Legislature should assure those privacy concerns are addressed. Editorial Board, Star Tribune, "Heading off terrorism in Minnesota," 6 Mar. 2021 Barring a trade or something unexpected, the departures of David Price, Mookie Betts, and now Bradley since last winter virtually assure that the Red Sox will have zero African-Americans on their Opening Day roster. Dan Shaughnessy, BostonGlobe.com, "Wondering about Jackie Bradley Jr.s’ place in Red Sox lore, and other thoughts," 5 Mar. 2021 Under his administration, the agencies that typically assure the accuracy and proper usage of medical products like tests and vaccines—the FDA and the CDC—have been weakened and politicized. James Hamblin, The Atlantic, "How We Survive the Winter," 18 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'assure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of assure

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

History and Etymology for assure

Middle English, from Anglo-French asseurer, assurer, from Medieval Latin assecurare, from Latin ad- + securus secure

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Time Traveler for assure

Time Traveler

The first known use of assure was in the 14th century

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Statistics for assure

Last Updated

3 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Assure.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/assure. Accessed 5 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for assure

assure

verb

English Language Learners Definition of assure

: to make (something) certain
: to tell someone in a very strong and definite way that something will happen or that something is true

assure

verb
as·​sure | \ ə-ˈshu̇r How to pronounce assure (audio) \
assured; assuring

Kids Definition of assure

1 : to give certainty, confidence, or comfort to He assured the children all was well. She assured herself that the doors were locked.
2 : to inform positively I assure you that you won't be disappointed.
3 : to provide a guarantee of assure their safety Hard work assures success.
as·​sure
assured; assuring

Legal Definition of assure

1 chiefly British : insure
2a : to inform positively the seller assured the buyer of his honesty
b : to provide a guarantee of

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Comments on assure

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