interest

noun
in·​ter·​est | \ ˈin-t(ə-)rəst How to pronounce interest (audio) ; ˈin-tə-ˌrest, -ˌtrest; ˈin-tərst \

Definition of interest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a feeling that accompanies or causes special attention to something or someone : concern
b : something or someone that arouses such attention
c : a quality in a thing or person arousing interest
3a : a charge for borrowed money generally a percentage of the amount borrowed
b : the profit in goods or money that is made on invested capital
c : an excess above what is due or expected returned the insults with interest
4a(1) : right, title, or legal share in something
(2) : participation in advantage and responsibility

interest

verb
interested; interesting; interests

Definition of interest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to engage the attention or arouse the interest of
2 : to induce or persuade to participate or engage

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Examples of interest in a Sentence

Noun She told us about her lifelong interest in music. The kids listened to the speaker for a little while, but then lost interest. The speaker wasn't able to hold their interest. She took an active interest in the political debate. He expressed an interest in learning more about photography. The stories about his personal life add interest to the book. I thought this article might be of interest to you. We visited many places of interest on our vacation. The price of the ticket was a matter of interest to everyone. Music is one of her many interests. Verb Military history doesn't really interest me. It might interest you to know that the woman in this photograph is your great-grandmother. It interested me to learn that she had once lived in California. The salesman tried to interest me in a more expensive computer.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Purdue, West Virginia and Northern Kentucky have also expressed interest. Scott Springer, Cincinnati.com, "Princeton sophomores Hardman, Oldacre get men's, women's basketball recruiting attention," 12 Feb. 2020 House Republicans have pushed a comparatively modest set of reforms to lower prices, and Republican leadership in the Senate has expressed little interest in a separate, bipartisan drug pricing effort. Lev Facher, STAT, "In reelection bid, a GOP lawmaker campaigns on Pelosi’s drug pricing bill," 11 Feb. 2020 Schoenfeld is the only one to enter the race so far, though Brandenburg has privately expressed interest in the post. oregonlive, "Feud erupts in public over million-dollar budget shortfall in Clackamas County," 10 Feb. 2020 The 2014 Cup Series champion has expressed an interest in the broadcast side of NASCAR following his eventual retirement from racing, but that’s clearly not an option for a few more years. Michelle R. Martinelli, For The Win, "44-year-old Kevin Harvick explains why he signed NASCAR contract extension through 2023," 8 Feb. 2020 And then there is the matter of Mr. de Blasio’s wife, Chirlane McCray, who has expressed some interest in running for Brooklyn borough president next year. New York Times, "Can a Lame Duck Mayor Get New Yorkers to Believe in Him Again?," 6 Feb. 2020 Before that happened, Howard heard that Bryant expressed interest in helping him out during the NBA Dunk Contest in Chicago (Feb. 15). Mark Medina, USA TODAY, "Lakers' Dwight Howard laments not telling Kobe Bryant how much he appreciated him," 5 Feb. 2020 The Pistons have previously expressed interest in guards Frank Ntilikina and Dennis Smith Jr. Vince Ellis, Detroit Free Press, "How Detroit Pistons' Luke Kennard went from core piece to expendable trade asset," 5 Feb. 2020 The course has been years in the making, after several students, teachers and parents expressed an interest in seeing the district teach the subject. Evan Casey, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "These Wauwatosa high schools are offering a new course on what it means to be black in America today," 31 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The intelligence community whistleblower's testimony could interest the White House because his anonymous complaint about a July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky sparked the House Democrats' impeachment effort. Jerry Dunleavy, Washington Examiner, "'Perfectly reasonable': Cruz supports Ukraine whistleblower being called as a witness," 17 Jan. 2020 Surveys suggest many students are motivated to go to college to learn more about subjects that interest them - and to become a better person, said professor Anthony P. Carnevale, director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce. Susan Svrluga, Anchorage Daily News, "Is college worth it? A study measures return on investment - and gets some surprising results.," 14 Nov. 2019 Encourage their passions and give them opportunities to grow in areas that interest them. Nisha Ramchandani, Quartz India, "Hiring for early-stage Indian startups doesn’t have to be a hit-and-miss game," 20 Sep. 2019 The only raise that interested him involved his team’s play. Pat Graham, The Denver Post, "Mike Bobo banks on raise in play after turning down raise in pay," 23 Aug. 2019 For many years, Bill Bryson has been on his own particular journey of discovery into whatever interests him. John J. Kelly, Detroit Free Press, "Holiday gift guide 2019: The best books that will inspire and delight readers," 7 Dec. 2019 Gesine is a news obsessive; everything interests her, and the book seeks to be a comprehensive account of the ’60s, commenting on media coverage of Vietnam, housing segregation in Manhattan, the Prague Spring. New York Times, "Times Critics’ Top Books of 2019," 5 Dec. 2019 But what most interests me is at the societal level. Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker, "The Laws of Forgiveness," 18 Nov. 2019 Tonal variation is a big part of what interests me. Monique Valeris, ELLE Decor, "The Rules of Decorating with Color, According to Rebecca Atwood," 3 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'interest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of interest

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4a(1)

Verb

1608, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for interest

Noun

Middle English, probably alteration of earlier interesse, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, to be between, make a difference, concern, from inter- + esse to be — more at is

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Time Traveler for interest

Time Traveler

The first known use of interest was in the 15th century

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Statistics for interest

Last Updated

15 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Interest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interest. Accessed 23 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for interest

interest

noun

Financial Definition of interest

What It Is

Interest is the cost of borrowing money for a certain period of time.

How It Works

Let's assume you need $500,000 to buy a house. The "price" of borrowing that money is interest, and it is expressed as a percentage of the amount of money you obtain. The borrower pays the interest to the lender. The rate of interest reflects the time value of money, the borrower's credit risk, inflation rates and a variety of other market conditions.

Why It Matters

Interest rates are some of the most powerful and influential components of an economy. As a result,The definition of interest on InvestingAnswers most countries take a keen interest, if not an active role, in monitoring interest rates. They also affect individual, day-to-day consumer decisions, such as determining whether it's a good time to buy a house, borrow money for a college degree, or put money in a specific type of bank account.

Source: Investing Answers

interest

noun
How to pronounce interest (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of interest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling of wanting to learn more about something or to be involved in something
: a quality that attracts your attention and makes you want to learn more about something or to be involved in something
: something (such as a hobby) that a person enjoys learning about or doing

interest

verb

English Language Learners Definition of interest (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to want to learn more about something or to become involved in something
: to persuade (someone) to have, take, or participate in (something)

interest

noun
in·​ter·​est | \ ˈin-trəst How to pronounce interest (audio) , ˈin-tə-rəst \

Kids Definition of interest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a feeling of concern or curiosity about or desire to be involved with something an interest in music We lost interest in the game.
2 : a quality that makes something more appealing or interesting Personal stories add interest to the book.
3 : something that a person enjoys learning about or doing Sports is one of his many interests.
4 : something that provides help or benefit to a person or group It's in your interest to study.
5 : the money paid by a borrower for the use of borrowed money
6 : the profit made on money that is invested
7 : a right, title, or legal share in something They bought out his interest in the company.
8 interests plural : a group financially interested in an industry or business mining interests

interest

verb
interested; interesting

Kids Definition of interest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to persuade to become involved in Can I interest you in joining us?
2 : to arouse and hold the concern, curiosity, or attention of This movie doesn't interest me.

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interest

noun
in·​ter·​est | \ ˈin-trəst; ˈin-tə-rəst, -ˌrest How to pronounce interest (audio) \

Legal Definition of interest

1 : a right, title, claim, or share in property
Article Nine security interest
: security interest in this entry
beneficial interest
: the right to the use and benefit of property a beneficial interest in the trust
contingent interest
: a future interest whose vesting is dependent upon the occurrence or nonoccurrence of a future event — compare vested interest in this entry
controlling interest
: sufficient stock ownership in a corporation to exert control over policy
equitable interest
: an interest (as a beneficial interest) that is held by virtue of equitable title or that may be claimed on the ground of equitable relief claimed an equitable interest in the debtor's assets
executory interest
: a future interest other than a remainder or reversion that may take effect upon the divesting of a prior interest or one created simultaneously

Note: Unlike a remainder, an executory interest does not require the expiration of a prior interest. It was designed to guard against the destructibility of contingent remainders set forth in the rule in Shelley's case.

expectation interest
: the interest of a party to a breached contract in receiving the benefit of the bargain by being put in a position as good as that which would have resulted had the contract been performed

called also expectancy interest

— compare reliance interest in this entry
future interest
: an interest in property limited or created so that its owner will come into the use, possession, or enjoyment of it at some future time — see also contingent interest and executory interest in this entry — compare remainder, reversion
insurable interest
: an interest or stake in property or in a person that arises from the potential for especially financial loss upon the destruction of the property or the death of the person and that is a requirement for enforcing an insurance contract

Note: The purpose of requiring an insurable interest is to prevent the use of insurance as a form of gambling or as a method of profiting from destruction.

legal interest
: an interest that is recognized in law (as by legal title) — compare equitable interest in this entry, legal title at title
life interest
: an interest lasting for the duration of a person's life that forecloses the ability to affect the property beyond that term — compare life estate at estate sense 1
possessory interest
: an interest (as a right) involving or arising out of the possession of property

Note: A possessory interest is based on control rather than use. Thus a lessee who occupies and controls the use of property has a possessory interest, while a party who has an easement does not.

purchase money security interest
1 : the security interest held by the seller of collateral to secure payment of all or part of the price
2 : the security interest of a person that gives value to a debtor so that the debtor may acquire rights in or the use of collateral
reliance interest
: the interest of a party to a breached contract in being compensated for detriments suffered (as expenses incurred) in reliance on the agreement — compare expectation interest in this entry
reversionary interest
: an interest in property (as a possibility of reverter or a power of termination) remaining in the transferor of the property or in his or her successor in interest
security interest
1 : an interest in property that exists by contract as security for payment or performance of an obligation the security interest of a mortgagee in the mortgaged property also : lien

Note: While a lien may be created by statutory or judicial means without any agreement providing for security (as in the case of a tax lien or judgment lien), a security interest and lien may inhere in the same claim, as when a mortgage comprises both a lien on and security interest in the mortgaged property.

2 : an interest in personal property or fixtures created by a security agreement that secures payment or performance of an obligation the creditor had a security interest in the inventory and accounts receivable of the business

called also Article Nine security interest

— see also attach sense 3, collateral sense 2, perfect entry 2 sense b, purchase money security interest in this entry

Note: Security interests in personal property are governed by Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The security interest set out in Article 9 largely replaces the traditional devices for security, such as the pledge and chattel mortgage. A security interest in property that has attached enables a creditor to obtain satisfaction of a debt out of the property without the need to obtain a judgment in court and levy on the property. Further, it provides the creditor with priority over competing claims against the property.

terminable interest
: an interest (as in a life estate) that will terminate upon the occurrence of an event or the passing of time
vested interest
: a present and certain right to the present or future enjoyment of property — compare contingent interest in this entry
working interest
: the interest of a party that holds the right to oil, gas, or minerals on a property and that bears production costs — see also overriding royalty
2 : a specific concern or level of involvement (as financial involvement) especially that warrants recognition or causes bias had a right to intervene because of an interest in the litigation recused himself due to an interest in the matter — see also conflict of interest
3 : something that causes or warrants particular attention: as
a : a principle, purpose, or object of concern
compelling state interest
: a governmental interest (as in educating children or protecting the public) which is so important that it outweighs individual rights
public interest
1a : the general welfare and rights of the public that are to be recognized, protected, and advanced the attorney general has standing as a representative of the public interest
b : a specific public benefit or stake in something the public interest in controlling crime
2 : the concern or attention of the public a matter of widespread public interest
b : a right especially that arises from a constitution (as the U.S. Constitution) especially : such a right considered as an issue or claim created in or involving a particular situation or thing no person will be deprived of his interests in the absence of a proceeding in which he may present his case Marshall v. Jerrico, Inc., 446 U.S. 238 (1980)
liberty interest
: an interest in freedom from governmental deprivation of liberty especially without due process the liberty interest implicated by the needless discouragement of the exercise of the right to counselState v. Albert, 899 P.2d 103 (1995) (dissent)
privacy interest
: an interest in freedom from governmental intrusion into matters in which one has a reasonable expectation of privacy we have no privacy interest protected by the federal Constitution in limiting public or government access to knowledge of our financial transactions— L. H. Tribe
property interest
: an interest in freedom from governmental deprivation of property and sources of financial gain (as employment or a government benefit) without due process broadly : something (as a job or benefit) to which one has a legitimate claim of entitlement and that cannot be taken away without due process as distinguished from the unprotected object of a need, desire, or expectation
4 : the well-being of a person often used in pl. does not serve the child's best interests
5 : a charge for the use of another's money that is usually a percentage of the money being used an account yielding 7% interest paid back the loan with interest
compound interest
: interest computed on the sum of the original principal and accrued interest
legal interest
: a lawful interest rate and especially the highest rate allowed proposals to increase the legal interest on department store credit cards to 15%American Banker also : interest computed at such a rate awarded the defendant legal interest — compare usury
qualified residence interest
: interest that is deductible from adjusted gross income under federal tax law when it is paid on debt that is secured by one's residence and that was incurred for the acquisition, construction, improvement, or refinancing of the residence or through a home equity loan
simple interest
: interest computed on the principal of a loan or account

History and Etymology for interest

probably alteration of earlier interesse, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, to be between, make a difference, concern, from inter- between, among + esse to be

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