reversion

noun

re·​ver·​sion ri-ˈvər-zhən How to pronounce reversion (audio)
-shən
1
a
: the part of a simple estate remaining in the control of its owner after the owner has granted therefrom a lesser particular estate
b
: a future interest in property left in the control of a grantor or the grantor's successor
2
: the right of succession or future possession or enjoyment
3
a
: an act or the process of returning (as to a former condition)
b
: a return toward an ancestral type or condition : reappearance of an ancestral character
4
: an act or instance of turning the opposite way : the state of being so turned
5
: a product of reversion
specifically : an organism with an atavistic character : throwback

Examples of reversion in a Sentence

His photos document the land's reversion to swamp. the reversion of the estate
Recent Examples on the Web The pattern wasn’t simple reversion so much as commingling. Madeleine Schwartz Soneela Nankani Tanya Pérez Brian St. Pierre, New York Times, 14 May 2024 The catalogs of two artists, which account for about 1% of the catalog’s value, are subject to contractual reversion or termination prior to the final payment date. Glenn Peoples, Billboard, 21 Feb. 2024 This doesn’t guarantee prices experience some mean reversion selling, but the odds strongly favor such. Moneyshow, Forbes, 1 Mar. 2024 Also, the Hotline believes deeply in reversion to the mean, and Utah’s unrelenting injury issues in 2023 will give way to above-average health next fall. Jon Wilner, The Mercury News, 25 Jan. 2024 Opportunities for minority groups, however, are vulnerable to reversion. Paige McGlauflin, Fortune, 28 Nov. 2023 In 1992, after the official dissolution of the Soviet Union and the reversion of the name Leningrad to St. Petersburg, the orchestra again became known as the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Tim Page, Washington Post, 2 Nov. 2023 But through spending reversions, collecting other non-tax revenues, and other moves, her budget office believes the gap is actually about $40 million. Samantha J. Gross, BostonGlobe.com, 13 Sep. 2023 The most notable change is the reversion from the company's proprietary Lightning charging port to a USB-C port to comply with European Union common charger laws. James Powel, USA TODAY, 11 Sep. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'reversion.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin reversion-, reversio act of returning, from revertere

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of reversion was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near reversion

Cite this Entry

“Reversion.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reversion. Accessed 28 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

reversion

noun
re·​ver·​sion ri-ˈvər-zhən How to pronounce reversion (audio)
1
: a right of future possession (as of property or a title)
2
a
: an act or the process of returning (as to an earlier condition)
b
: a product of reversion
3
: an act or instance of turning the opposite way : the state of being so turned

Medical Definition

reversion

noun
re·​ver·​sion ri-ˈvər-zhən, -shən How to pronounce reversion (audio)
1
a
: an act or the process of returning (as to a former condition)
b
: a return toward an ancestral type or condition : reappearance of an ancestral character
2
: a product of reversion
specifically : an organism with an atavistic character

Legal Definition

reversion

noun
re·​ver·​sion ri-ˈvər-zhən How to pronounce reversion (audio)
1
: the returning of an estate upon its termination to the former owner or to his or her successor in interest
2
a
: the present vested interest in the residue of an estate that remains in its owner after the grant therefrom of a lesser estate (as a life estate) and that will commence in possession by operation of law upon termination of the lesser estate
b
: the future interest in property left in a grantor or his or her successor in interest that is not subject to a condition precedent compare possibility of reverter, remainder
reversionary adjective
Etymology

Anglo-French, from Middle French, from Latin reversio act of turning back, from revertere to turn back

More from Merriam-Webster on reversion

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!