extract

verb
ex·tract | \ik-ˈstrakt, usually in sense 5 ˈek-ˌstrakt\
extracted; extracting; extracts

Definition of extract 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to draw forth (as by research) extract data

b : to pull or take out forcibly extracted a wisdom tooth

c : to obtain by much effort from someone unwilling extracted a confession

2a : to withdraw (something, such as a juice or a constituent element) by physical or chemical process

b : to treat with a solvent so as to remove a soluble substance

3 : to separate (a metal) from an ore

4 : to determine (a mathematical root) by calculation

5 : to select (excerpts) and copy out or cite

extract

noun
ex·tract | \ˈek-ˌstrakt \

Definition of extract (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a selection from a writing or discourse : excerpt

2 : a product (such as an essence or concentrate) prepared by extracting especially : a solution (as in alcohol) of essential constituents of a complex material (such as meat or an aromatic plant)

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Other Words from extract

Verb

extractability \ik-ˌstrak-tə-ˈbi-lə-tē, (ˌ)ek- \ noun
extractable \ik-ˈstrak-tə-bəl, ˈek-ˌstrak- \ adjective

Synonyms for extract

Synonyms: Verb

prize, pry, pull, root (out), tear (out), uproot, wrest, wring, yank

Synonyms: Noun

excerpt, passage

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Choose the Right Synonym for extract

Verb

educe, evoke, elicit, extract, extort mean to draw out something hidden, latent, or reserved. educe implies the bringing out of something potential or latent. educed order out of chaos evoke implies a strong stimulus that arouses an emotion or an interest or recalls an image or memory. a song that evokes warm memories elicit usually implies some effort or skill in drawing forth a response. careful questioning elicited the truth extract implies the use of force or pressure in obtaining answers or information. extracted a confession from him extort suggests a wringing or wresting from one who resists strongly. extorted their cooperation by threatening to inform

Do you exact or extract revenge?

The verb exact (as in, "exacting revenge" or "exacting a promise") is not as commonly encountered as the adjective exact, (as in "an exact copy" or "exact measurements"). Sometimes people will mistakenly use the more common verb extract when they really want exact. Extract can refer to removing something by pulling or cutting or to getting information from someone who does not want to give it. While both words refer to getting something they are used in different ways. You extract a tooth, but you exact revenge.

The Crisscrossing Histories of Abstract and Extract

Verb

Abstract is most frequently used as an adjective (“abstract ideas”) and a noun (“an abstract of the article”), but its somewhat less common use as a verb in English helps to clarify its Latin roots. The verb abstract is used to mean “summarize,” as in “abstracting an academic paper.” This meaning is a figurative derivative of the verb’s meanings “to remove” or “to separate.”

We trace the origins of abstract to the combination of the Latin roots ab-, a prefix meaning “from” or “away,” with the verb trahere, meaning “to pull” or “to draw.” The result was the Latin verb abstrahere, which meant “to remove forcibly” or “to drag away.” Its past participle abstractus had the meanings “removed,” “secluded,” “incorporeal,” and, ultimately, “summarized,” meanings which came to English from Medieval Latin.

Interestingly, the word passed from Latin into French with competing spellings as both abstract (closer to the Latin) and abstrait (which reflected the French form of abstrahere, abstraire), the spelling retained in modern French.

The idea of “removing” or “pulling away” connects abstract to extract, which stems from Latin through the combination of trahere with the prefix ex-, meaning “out of” or “away from.” Extract forms a kind of mirror image of abstract: more common as a verb, but also used as a noun and adjective. The adjective, meaning “derived or descended,” is now obsolete, as is a sense of the noun that overlapped with abstract, “summary.” The words intersected and have separated in modern English, but it’s easy to see that abstract applies to something that has been summarized, and summarized means “extracted from a larger work.”

Examples of extract in a Sentence

Verb

He extracted a credit card from his wallet. I had to have a tooth extracted. The tumor was surgically extracted. We finally extracted a confession from him. Investigators were able to extract useful information from the company's financial records. They are hoping to extract new insights from the test results. The machines extract the juice from the apples. oil extracted from sunflower seeds venom extracted from poisonous snakes

Noun

The recipe calls for a tablespoon of vanilla extract. the anthology includes a long extract from the epic poem
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

There's also the ethanol method, which extracts CBD from the plants using high-grain alcohol. Tehrene Firman, Redbook, "What Is CBD? Here's Everything You Need to Know," 5 June 2018 Put heavy cream, confectioners' sugar and extract in a medium bowl. Woman's Day Staff, Woman's Day, "Coconut Cream Cake," 8 Feb. 2018 Pia Wurtzbach, left, The Philippines' former Miss Universe and UNAIDS goodwill ambassador for Asia, looks on as a medical worker extracts her blood sample for an HIV test at a government office in suburban Manila on August 9, 2017. Kate Sheridan, Newsweek, "This Super-Sensitive HIV Test Could Use Spit To Diagnose People," 23 Jan. 2018 This is because Zeichner would be extracting the sample by using a punch tool, which is basically a tiny cookie cutter that takes out a cylinder of skin from the core of the mole. Marci Robin, Allure, "Beauty Mark Makeover: Why I Chose to Reduce the Size of My Mole Instead of Getting It Removed," 13 July 2018 Hemp can be used through various ways: smoking; consuming in edibles, such as brownies, cookies or candy bars; and extracted oils. Karen Pilarski, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Six things you might be asking about hemp," 13 July 2018 Those treatments involve extracting immune T cells, re-engineering them in a lab to home in on cancers, multiplying them, and then inserting them back into patients’ bodies. Sy Mukherjee, Fortune, "Brainstorm Health: Parker Institute CRISPR Breakthrough, Pfizer Reorganization, Gym Tax Deductions," 12 July 2018 The complicated operation to bring the boys out of the cave began on Sunday, when four were extracted. Stephen Wright, Fox News, "AP Interview: US rescuer details high-risk Thai cave mission," 11 July 2018 These are darker, deeper, and more extracted than the California wines, mostly owing to a cooler climate and a longer growing season. Patrick Comiskey, latimes.com, "Why you should be drinking Gamay Noir this summer," 11 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Its weightless, silky texture makes for a smooth wear under makeup and works as a daily moisturizer, while the yogurt and rice extract blend add super-hydrating and calming properties that help reduce irritation and redness within the skin. Tanisha Pina, Allure, "Dermstore's Sunscreen Sale Has All Your Favorite SPF Products at a Discount," 22 June 2018 In a medium bowl, whisk sugar, egg and almond extract until well blended and slightly thick, about 1 minute. Ashleigh Spitza, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "The joys - and time-saving benefits - of a minimalist's approach to entertaining," 12 May 2018 In another large bowl, with electric mixer on medium (no need to wash beaters), beat remaining 1 1/3 cups sugar, the orange peel and juice, oil, egg yolks and orange extract until well blended. Woman's Day, "Easter Orange-Chiffon Cake," 30 Dec. 2011 Ingredients: 2 pints strawberries 1 8-ounce package cream cheese, at room temperature 1 cup whipped cream ½ cup powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract½ cup blueberries Preparation: Wash and dry fruit. Jennifer Mcclellan, USA TODAY, "6 colorful July 4th recipes to make your party sparkle," 3 July 2018 Afterward, my complexion looks and feels decidedly healthier with a glow-y sheen from the leftover extract. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, "I Tried Knours, the Skin-Care Brand That Customizes a Routine Based on Your Menstrual Cycle," 1 June 2018 Remove from heat and stir in unsalted butter, pure vanilla extract, ground cinnamon, and cayenne until smooth. Marian Cooper Cairns, Country Living, "Hot Fudge Golden Grahams Parfait," 4 Jan. 2018 Ingredients 2 eggs 1¼ cups sugar 6 T pure maple syrup 1 T vanilla extract1¼ tsp. Alex Hitz, House Beautiful, "The Ultimate Fall Dessert: Apple-Pear Crumble with Maple-Cinnamon Ice Cream," 12 Sep. 2014 In a saucepan over medium heat, warm the brown rice syrup, peanut butter, umeboshi vinegar and vanilla extract, stirring constantly until the mixture is smooth, thin and beginning to bubble. Julia Sherman, New York Times, "A Cookbook of Artists’ Creative Summer Desserts," 22 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'extract.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of extract

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for extract

Verb

Middle English, from Latin extractus, past participle of extrahere, from ex- + trahere to draw

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Phrases Related to extract

extract oneself

Statistics for extract

Last Updated

17 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for extract

The first known use of extract was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for extract

extract

verb

English Language Learners Definition of extract

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to remove (something) by pulling it out or cutting it out

: to get (information, a response, etc.) from someone who does not want to give it

: to get (something, such as information) from something

extract

noun

English Language Learners Definition of extract (Entry 2 of 2)

: a substance that you get from something by using a machine or chemicals

: a short piece of writing that is taken from a longer work (such as a book)

extract

verb
ex·tract | \ik-ˈstrakt \
extracted; extracting

Kids Definition of extract

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to remove by pulling extract a tooth

2 : to get out by pressing, distilling, or by a chemical process extract juice

3 : to choose and take out for separate use He extracted a few lines from a poem.

extract

noun
ex·tract | \ˈek-ˌstrakt \

Kids Definition of extract (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a selection from a writing

2 : a product obtained by pressing, distilling, or by a chemical process vanilla extract

extract

transitive verb
ex·tract | \ik-ˈstrakt \

Medical Definition of extract 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to pull or take out forcibly extracted a wisdom tooth

2 : to withdraw (as the medicinally active components of a plant or animal tissue) by physical or chemical process also : to treat with a solvent so as to remove a soluble substance

Other Words from extract

extractability \ik-ˌstrak-tə-ˈbil-ət-ē, (ˌ)ek- \ noun plural extractabilities
extractable also extractible \ik-ˈstrak-tə-bəl, ˈek-ˌ \ adjective

extract

noun
ex·tract | \ˈek-ˌstrakt \

Medical Definition of extract (Entry 2 of 2)

: something prepared by extracting especially : a medicinally active pharmaceutical solution

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extract

noun
ex·tract | \ˈek-ˌstrakt \

Legal Definition of extract 

: a certified copy of a document that forms part of or is preserved in a public record

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Comments on extract

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