1

extract

play
verb ex·tract \ik-ˈstrakt, usually in sense 5 ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Definition of extract

  1. transitive verb
  2. 1a :  to draw forth (as by research) extract datab :  to pull or take out forcibly extracted a wisdom toothc :  to obtain by much effort from someone unwilling extracted a confession

  3. 2a :  to withdraw (as a juice or fraction) by physical or chemical processb :  to treat with a solvent so as to remove a soluble substance

  4. 3 :  to separate (a metal) from an ore

  5. 4 :  to determine (a mathematical root) by calculation

  6. 5 :  to select (excerpts) and copy out or cite

extractability

play \ik-ˌstrak-tə-ˈbi-lə-tē, (ˌ)ek-\ noun

extractable

play \ik-ˈstrak-tə-bəl, ˈek-ˌstrak-\ adjective

Examples of extract in a sentence

  1. He extracted a credit card from his wallet.

  2. I had to have a tooth extracted.

  3. The tumor was surgically extracted.

  4. We finally extracted a confession from him.

  5. Investigators were able to extract useful information from the company's financial records.

  6. They are hoping to extract new insights from the test results.

  7. The machines extract the juice from the apples.

  8. oil extracted from sunflower seeds

  9. venom extracted from poisonous snakes

The Crisscrossing Histories of abstract and extract

Abstract is most frequently used as an adjective (“abstract ideas”) and a noun (“an abstract of the article”), but its somewhat less common use as a verb in English helps to clarify its Latin roots. The verb abstract is used to mean “summarize,” as in “abstracting an academic paper.” This meaning is a figurative derivative of the verb’s meanings “to remove” or “to separate.”

We trace the origins of abstract to the combination of the Latin roots ab-, a prefix meaning “from” or “away,” with the verb trahere, meaning “to pull” or “to draw.” The result was the Latin verb abstrahere, which meant “to remove forcibly” or “to drag away.” Its past participle abstractus had the meanings “removed,” “secluded,” “incorporeal,” and, ultimately, “summarized,” meanings which came to English from Medieval Latin.

Interestingly, the word passed from Latin into French with competing spellings as both abstract (closer to the Latin) and abstrait (which reflected the French form of abstrahere, abstraire), the spelling retained in modern French.

The idea of “removing” or “pulling away” connects abstract to extract, which stems from Latin through the combination of trahere with the prefix ex-, meaning “out of” or “away from.” Extract forms a kind of mirror image of abstract: more common as a verb, but also used as a noun and adjective. The adjective, meaning “derived or descended,” is now obsolete, as is a sense of the noun that overlapped with abstract, “summary.” The words intersected and have separated in modern English, but it’s easy to see that abstract applies to something that has been summarized, and summarized means “extracted from a larger work.”

Origin and Etymology of extract

Middle English, from Latin extractus, past participle of extrahere, from ex- + trahere to draw


First Known Use: 15th century

Synonym Discussion of extract

educe, evoke, elicit, extract, extort mean to draw out something hidden, latent, or reserved. educe implies the bringing out of something potential or latent educed order out of chaos. evoke implies a strong stimulus that arouses an emotion or an interest or recalls an image or memory a song that evokes warm memories. elicit usually implies some effort or skill in drawing forth a response careful questioning elicited the truth. extract implies the use of force or pressure in obtaining answers or information extracted a confession from him. extort suggests a wringing or wresting from one who resists strongly extorted their cooperation by threatening to inform.

Other Chemical Engineering Terms


2

extract

play
noun ex·tract \ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Definition of extract

  1. 1 :  a selection from a writing or discourse :  excerpt

  2. 2 :  a product (as an essence or concentrate) prepared by extracting; especially :  a solution (as in alcohol) of essential constituents of a complex material (as meat or an aromatic plant)

Examples of extract in a sentence

  1. The recipe calls for a tablespoon of vanilla extract.

  2. the anthology includes a long extract from the epic poem

15th Century

First Known Use of extract

15th century



EXTRACT Defined for English Language Learners

1

extract

play
verb ex·tract \ik-ˈstrakt, usually in sense 5 ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Definition of extract for English Language Learners

  • : to remove (something) by pulling it out or cutting it out

  • : to get (information, a response, etc.) from someone who does not want to give it

  • : to get (something, such as information) from something


2

extract

play
noun ex·tract \ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Definition of extract for English Language Learners

  • : a substance that you get from something by using a machine or chemicals

  • : a short piece of writing that is taken from a longer work (such as a book)


EXTRACT Defined for Kids

1

extract

play
verb ex·tract \ik-ˈstrakt\

Definition of extract for Students

extracted

;

extracting

  1. 1 :  to remove by pulling extract a tooth

  2. 2 :  to get out by pressing, distilling, or by a chemical process extract juice

  3. 3 :  to choose and take out for separate use He extracted a few lines from a poem.

Word Root of extract

The Latin word tractus, meaning “pulled” or “dragged,” gives us the root tract. Words from the Latin tractus have to do with being pulled or dragged. To attract is to pull or draw towards you. To distract is to pull someone's attention away from something. To extract is to pull one thing out of another. To subtract is to pull a portion or number away from a group or from a whole.


2

extract

play
noun ex·tract \ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Definition of extract for Students

  1. 1 :  a selection from a writing

  2. 2 :  a product obtained by pressing, distilling, or by a chemical process vanilla extract


Medical Dictionary

1

extract

play
transitive verb ex·tract \ik-ˈstrakt\

Medical Definition of extract

  1. 1:  to pull or take out forcibly extracted a wisdom tooth

  2. 2:  to withdraw (as the medicinally active components of a plant or animal tissue) by physical or chemical process; also :  to treat with a solvent so as to remove a soluble substance

extractability

\ik-ˌstrak-tə-ˈbil-ət-ē, (ˌ)ek-\play noun plural

extractabilities

extractable

also

extractible

\ik-ˈstrak-tə-bəl, ˈek-ˌ\play adjective

2

extract

play
noun ex·tract \ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Medical Definition of extract

  1. :  something prepared by extracting; especially :  a medicinally active pharmaceutical solution


Law Dictionary

extract

play
noun ex·tract \ˈek-ˌstrakt\

Legal Definition of extract

  1. :  a certified copy of a document that forms part of or is preserved in a public record



Seen and Heard

What made you want to look up extract? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

soon or gladly

Get Word of the Day daily email!

WORD GAMES

Take a 3-minute break and test your skills!

  • shamrock
  • What is the best definition of green-eyed monster?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ