pull

verb
\ ˈpu̇l also ˈpəl \
pulled; pulling; pulls

Definition of pull 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to exert force upon so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the force
b : to stretch (cooling candy) repeatedly pull taffy
c : to strain abnormally pull a tendon
d : to hold back (a racehorse) from winning
e : to work (an oar) by drawing back strongly
2a : to draw out from the skin pull feathers from a rooster's tail
b : to pluck from a plant or by the roots pull flowers pull turnips
c : extract pull a tooth
3 : to hit (a ball) toward the left from a right-handed swing or toward the right from a left-handed swing — compare push
4 : to draw apart : rend, tear
5 : to print (something, such as a proof) by impression
6a : to remove from a place or situation pull the engine pulled the pitcher in the third inning pulled the show
b : revoke If they're caught dumping, they'll get their license pulled.— Alexandra Alger
7 : to bring (a weapon) into the open pulled a knife
8a : perform, carry out pull an all-nighter pull guard duty
b : commit, perpetrate pull a robbery pull a prank
9a : put on, assume pull a grin
b : to act or behave in the manner of pulled a Horace Greely and went west— Steve Rushin
10a : to draw the support or attention of : attract pull votes often used with in
b : obtain, secure pulled a B in the course
11 : to demand or obtain an advantage over someone by the assertion of pull rank

intransitive verb

1a : to use force in drawing, dragging, or tugging
b : to move especially through the exercise of mechanical energy the car pulled clear of the rut
c(1) : to take a drink
(2) : to draw hard in smoking pulled at a pipe
d : to strain against the bit
2 : to draw a gun
3 : to admit of being pulled
4 : to feel or express strong sympathy : root pulling for my team to win
5 of an offensive lineman in football : to move back from the line of scrimmage and toward one flank to provide blocking for a ballcarrier
pull a face
: to make a face : grimace
pull a fast one
: to perpetrate a trick or fraud
pull oneself together
: to regain one's composure
pull one's leg
: to deceive someone playfully : hoax
pull one's weight
: to do one's full share of the work
pull punches or less commonly pull a punch
: to refrain from using all the force at one's disposal
pull stakes or pull up stakes
: to move out : leave
pull strings or less commonly pull wires
: to exert hidden influence or control
pull the plug
1 : to disconnect a medical life-support system
2 : to withdraw essential and especially financial support
pull the rug from under
: to weaken or unsettle especially by removing support or assistance from
pull the string
: to throw a changeup
pull the trigger
: to make a decisive move or action
pull the wool over one's eyes
: to blind to the true situation : hoodwink
pull together
: to work in harmony : cooperate

pull

noun, often attributive

Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act or an instance of pulling
b(1) : a draft of liquid
(2) : an inhalation of smoke
c : the effort expended in moving a long pull uphill
d : force required to overcome resistance to pulling a trigger with a four pound pull
e : a competition in which a heavily weighted sled is pulled by participants usually using draft animals or machines a tractor pull the county fair's annual ox pull The truck pull may be one one of the machine age's weirdest mutations. Modified pickup trucks and dragsters are hooked to trailers or "sleds" weighed down with 30,000 to 40,000 pounds … They rev up their engines and slog their way across a 200-foot mud track.
2a : advantage
b : special influence
4 : a device for pulling something or for operating by pulling a drawer pull
5 : a force that attracts, compels, or influences : attraction
6 : an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching a muscle pull a groin pull

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Other Words from pull

Verb

puller noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for pull

Synonyms: Verb

drag, draw, hale, haul, lug, tow, tug

Synonyms: Noun

draw, haul, jerk, pluck, tug, wrench, yank

Antonyms: Verb

drive, propel, push

Antonyms: Noun

push

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Examples of pull in a Sentence

Verb

He pulled the door open and ran out. The cat will scratch you if you keep pulling its tail. Make a knot in the rope and pull it tight. Pull the baby's chair closer to the table. She pulled the blanket over her head. We tried pushing and pulling but couldn't get the couch to move. Grab the end of the rope and pull as hard as you can. We spent the morning in the garden pulling weeds. I accidentally pulled one of the buttons off my shirt. He pulled the plug out of the socket.

Noun

She gave the door a few hard pulls and it opened. Give the rope a pull. He has a lot of pull in local political circles.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

This was pulled back somewhat after the brutal repression of demonstrators in Tiananmen Square in 1989, but soon resumed. Jon Talton, The Seattle Times, "‘It’s the economy, stupid,’ and the bad luck of George H.W. Bush," 4 Dec. 2018 Model Grace Elizabeth's hair was pulled into a super-high ponytail, decorated with three Versace brooches, and then pounds of fake hair were added in for the sky-high cascading effect. Jenna Rosenstein, Harper's BAZAAR, "The Hair at Versace's Show Was So Big and Full of Secrets," 3 Dec. 2018 Correction, November 23rd, 7:00AM ET: A previous version of the article said the games had been pulled, but their removal is scheduled in the coming weeks. James Vincent, The Verge, "Loot box crackdown forces Final Fantasy and Kingdom Hearts games out of Belgium," 23 Nov. 2018 You guys are less pulled into the debates going on right now, but still have to be thinking about them. Eric Johnson, Recode, "For some under-represented people in tech, life is getting better. For others, this is the ‘dark timeline.’," 5 Sep. 2018 The streets of this quaint little town look as if they were pulled directly from the pages of a storybook with every charming restaurant, bar, and hotel serving as its characters. Kara Thompson, Town & Country, "T&C Travel Guide: Winter In Cape May, New Jersey," 10 Dec. 2018 Every time something in the first undulator changes, the magnets used to pull the bunch back together again need to be changed. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Single-beam laser becomes multi-beam laser by kicking electrons," 5 Dec. 2018 The historic church, quaint covered bridge, and other pretty sets were all pulled from real-life spots in Mansfield and the nearby countryside, while many of the charming small town scenes were filmed in Covington, according to Atlanta Magazine. Jessica Leigh Mattern, Country Living, "Hallmark's 'Christmas Everlasting' Will Inspire You to Take a Road Trip Through Georgia," 24 Nov. 2018 Along the tranquil shoreline of Hanoi's Trúc Bạch Lake, where, half a century ago, John McCain was pulled from the water with his parachute, there’s a humble little restaurant that McCain himself might have found amusing, if decidedly odd. Peter Jon Lindberg, Condé Nast Traveler, "Hanoi, Time and Again," 20 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Your pulls can be used simply for personal reflection, or even as a prompt for journaling. Erica Euse, Teen Vogue, "How Tarot Cards Are Used to Help Mental Health," 27 Dec. 2018 Together the digitally savvy pair pulls inspiration from social media, obscure comic books, even an inkling that something is about to pop in the zeitgeist. Taylor Rainbolt, Glamour, "Alana Mayo, Michael B. Jordan's Secret Weapon, Is Poised to Take Over Hollywood," 12 Oct. 2018 Growing Eggplants Mulch immediately after transplanting, and gently hand pull any invading weeds. The Editors, Good Housekeeping, "The Secret to Growing the Most Flavorful Eggplants," 27 July 2018 That move does not mean James will not return to the Cavs on a new deal — that remains an option — but does ensure the NBA’s best player will exercise his considerable gravitational pull on the free agency process league-wide. Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News, "As free agency opens, Spurs’ ‘Kawisis’ looms large — but there are other issues too," 29 June 2018 After current host Jimmy Fallon feigned a muscle pull, his predecessor tagged in for a few monologue jokes. Aurelie Corinthios, PEOPLE.com, "Jay Leno Goes After Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose as He Tackles Sexual Misconduct on Tonight Show," 22 Mar. 2018 The disparities between the downward pull of Milwaukee County on low-income children and the upward push of those children in surrounding counties, such as Waukesha and Ozaukee, are some of the largest in the nation. Kevin Crowe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Can where you grow up play a strong role in how much money you make as an adult?," 28 Feb. 2018 The true pull, though, came from the liquor’s cult following. Conor Orr, SI.com, "Craigslist Crazies: Trading Rare Booze, Diamonds and Dog Poop Scooping for Super Bowl Tickets," 2 Feb. 2018 On their fourth album, Ruins, out Jan. 19, sister duo Johanna and Klara Söderberg pull from rock, country and folk influences, blending the warmth of Fleetwood Mac with Leonard Cohen’s aching lyrics and the rockabilly stomp of the Dixie Chicks. Raisa Bruner, Time, "Swedish Band First Aid Kit Pays Homage to American Rock on Ruins," 18 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pull.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pull

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for pull

Verb

Middle English, from Old English pullian; akin to Middle Low German pulen to shell, cull

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Statistics for pull

Last Updated

9 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for pull

The first known use of pull was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for pull

pull

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hold onto and move (someone or something) in a particular direction and especially toward yourself

: to remove (something) by gripping it and using force

: to cause (something you are holding or something that is attached to you) to move with you as you go in a particular direction

pull

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of moving or trying to move something by holding it and bringing it toward you : the act of pulling something

: special influence and power over other people

: an ability or power to attract someone or to make someone want to go somewhere, do something, etc.

pull

verb
\ ˈpu̇l \
pulled; pulling

Kids Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to use force on so as to cause movement toward the force pulled the rope pulling a wagon
2 : to separate from a firm or a natural attachment pull a tooth pull weeds
3 : move entry 1 sense 1 A train pulled out of the station.
4 : to draw apart : tear, rend I pulled a flower to pieces.
5 : to move (something) up or down Pull down the shade.
6 : to operate by drawing toward Going against the current, he had to pull the oars harder.
7 : to stretch repeatedly pull taffy
pull through
: to survive a difficult or dangerous period She was seriously ill, but pulled through.

pull

noun

Kids Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act or an instance of grasping and causing to move two pulls on the cord
2 : a device for making something move
3 : a force that draws one body toward another the pull of gravity
\ ˈpu̇l \

Medical Definition of pull 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : extract sense 1 pull a tooth
2 : to strain or stretch abnormally pull a tendon pull a muscle

pull

noun

Medical Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

: an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching especially of a muscle — see groin pull

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More from Merriam-Webster on pull

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with pull

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for pull

Spanish Central: Translation of pull

Nglish: Translation of pull for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pull for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about pull

Comments on pull

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