pull

verb
\ ˈpu̇l How to pronounce pull (audio) also ˈpəl How to pronounce pull (audio) \
pulled; pulling; pulls

Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to exert force upon so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the force
b : to stretch (cooling candy) repeatedly pull taffy
c : to strain abnormally pull a tendon
d : to hold back (a racehorse) from winning
e : to work (an oar) by drawing back strongly
2a : to draw out from the skin pull feathers from a rooster's tail
b : to pluck from a plant or by the roots pull flowers pull turnips
c : extract pull a tooth
3 : to hit (a ball) toward the left from a right-handed swing or toward the right from a left-handed swing — compare push
4 : to draw apart : rend, tear
5 : to print (something, such as a proof) by impression
6a : to remove from a place or situation pull the engine pulled the pitcher in the third inning pulled the show
b : revoke If they're caught dumping, they'll get their license pulled.— Alexandra Alger
7 : to bring (a weapon) into the open pulled a knife
8a : perform, carry out pull an all-nighter pull guard duty
b : commit, perpetrate pull a robbery pull a prank
9a : put on, assume pull a grin
b : to act or behave in the manner of pulled a Horace Greely and went west— Steve Rushin
10a : to draw the support or attention of : attract pull votes often used with in
b : obtain, secure pulled a B in the course
11 : to demand or obtain an advantage over someone by the assertion of pull rank

intransitive verb

1a : to use force in drawing, dragging, or tugging
b : to move especially through the exercise of mechanical energy the car pulled clear of the rut
c(1) : to take a drink
(2) : to draw hard in smoking pulled at a pipe
d : to strain against the bit
2 : to draw a gun
3 : to admit of being pulled
4 : to feel or express strong sympathy : root pulling for my team to win
5 of an offensive lineman in football : to move back from the line of scrimmage and toward one flank to provide blocking for a ballcarrier
pull a face
: to make a face : grimace
pull a fast one
: to perpetrate a trick or fraud
pull oneself together
: to regain one's composure
pull one's leg
: to deceive someone playfully : hoax
pull one's weight
: to do one's full share of the work
pull punches or less commonly pull a punch
: to refrain from using all the force at one's disposal
pull stakes or pull up stakes
: to move out : leave
pull strings or less commonly pull wires
: to exert hidden influence or control
pull the plug
1 : to disconnect a medical life-support system
2 : to withdraw essential and especially financial support
pull the rug from under
: to weaken or unsettle especially by removing support or assistance from
pull the string
: to throw a changeup
pull the trigger
: to make a decisive move or action
pull the wool over one's eyes
: to blind to the true situation : hoodwink
pull together
: to work in harmony : cooperate

pull

noun, often attributive

Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act or an instance of pulling
b(1) : a draft of liquid
(2) : an inhalation of smoke
c : the effort expended in moving a long pull uphill
d : force required to overcome resistance to pulling a trigger with a four pound pull
e : a competition in which a heavily weighted sled is pulled by participants usually using draft animals or machines a tractor pull the county fair's annual ox pull The truck pull may be one one of the machine age's weirdest mutations. Modified pickup trucks and dragsters are hooked to trailers or "sleds" weighed down with 30,000 to 40,000 pounds … They rev up their engines and slog their way across a 200-foot mud track.
2a : advantage
b : special influence
4 : a device for pulling something or for operating by pulling a drawer pull
5 : a force that attracts, compels, or influences : attraction
6 : an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching a muscle pull a groin pull

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Other Words from pull

Verb

puller noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for pull

Synonyms: Verb

drag, draw, hale, haul, lug, tow, tug

Synonyms: Noun

draw, haul, jerk, pluck, tug, wrench, yank

Antonyms: Verb

drive, propel, push

Antonyms: Noun

push

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Examples of pull in a Sentence

Verb

He pulled the door open and ran out. The cat will scratch you if you keep pulling its tail. Make a knot in the rope and pull it tight. Pull the baby's chair closer to the table. She pulled the blanket over her head. We tried pushing and pulling but couldn't get the couch to move. Grab the end of the rope and pull as hard as you can. We spent the morning in the garden pulling weeds. I accidentally pulled one of the buttons off my shirt. He pulled the plug out of the socket.

Noun

She gave the door a few hard pulls and it opened. Give the rope a pull. He has a lot of pull in local political circles.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The couple’s other children, Drake, Ella, Duke, and Emmie Kay are pulling their weight as well. Megan Stein, Country Living, "Joanna Gaines Says There’s ‘Literally a Sign-Up Sheet’ for People to Hold Baby Crew," 30 Mar. 2019 The only thing that could pull me away from said obsessive QE3 viewing is, of course the Fab Five—or four of them at least—on Jimmy Kimmel Live! Taylor Mead, House Beautiful, "If a Queer Eye and Marie Kondo Crossover Episode Happens, I'll Need CPR," 20 Mar. 2019 Since Gucci apologized and pulled the balaclava sweater from shelves in February, fans of the brand have been asking them to do more to make a change. Alyssa Hardy, Teen Vogue, "Gucci Launches Changemakers Program and Diversity Initiative," 18 Mar. 2019 And don’t forget the earlier stimulus, from the Obama administration and Congress, and from the Bernanke Federal Reserve, that pulled the country out of the Great Recession and started it on a slow but steady recovery. Jon Talton, The Seattle Times, "So far, economy’s Big Mo’ can’t be stopped by scandal or bad policies," 5 Feb. 2019 Hot air from a fire in a fireplace rises through the column of a chimney, creating a draft that pulls more air into the fireplace, feeding the fire. Kevin Dupzyk, Popular Mechanics, "So You Want To Fix Your Chimney," 21 Dec. 2018 That’s just the beginning of a story that pulls different iterations of Spider-Man from alternative universes into Miles’ own. Bryan Bishop, The Verge, "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is dazzling, hilarious, and unique," 14 Dec. 2018 Instacart will begin pulling the first group of 1,415 workers out of its 76 Whole Foods locations in February. Recode Staff, Recode, "Recode Daily: Facebook wants you to buy — and watch — HBO on Facebook," 14 Dec. 2018 The bodycam video released Sunday shows the two officers pulling their cruiser up to Blevins, who's seated on a curb near a woman with a child in a stroller. Travis Fedschun, Fox News, "Minneapolis police release footage of fatal shooting of armed man; officers won't face charges," 2 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But precum probably isn’t to blame for the unreliability of the pull-out method. Kasandra Brabaw, SELF, "Can You Get Pregnant From Precum?," 7 Mar. 2019 Next, the fittings are rugged, pre-finished to resist corrosion, and swing hardware is bolted to prevent any dangerous pull-outs. Roy Berendsohn, Popular Mechanics, "How to Build a Wooden Swing Set," 30 Jan. 2019 What’s important is that in that equation — among all the variables at play, which include mass, velocity, gravitational pull, magnetism, and electricity — lies the Planck constant. Brian Resnick, Vox, "The world is about to redefine the kilogram," 15 Nov. 2018 The company has three models and two different sizes of teardrop campers, with the largest model boasting a queen memory foam mattress, bug screen, and a pull-out writing desk. Megan Barber, Curbed, "5 lightweight camper trailers you can buy right now," 13 Sep. 2018 For details about the 5 to 9:30 p.m. event behind Olive Peirce Middle School on Hanson Lane, see the 12-page pull-out section included in this issue if the Sentinel. Ramona Sentinel, "Independence Day to start with parade, end with fireworks," 27 June 2018 Trump's pull-out pleased Iran hawks in Congress and U.S. allies in Israel and Saudi Arabia, which both agreed with Trump that the deal gave Iran too much leeway to someday rebuild nuclear programs that could be used to produce a bomb. Tracy Wilkinson, latimes.com, "Trump pulls U.S. out of Iran nuclear deal and announces sweeping new economic sanctions," 8 May 2018 Miles 9 and 11 are your first chances of spotting it, the latter spot having a pull-out and interpretive waysides with information about the cliff. Bailey Berg, Anchorage Daily News, "Taking in Denali National Park and ‘The Great One’," 3 May 2018 Twenty suites, which can sleep up to seven people, are available as well with pull-out sleepers in the living-room area. Degen Pener, The Hollywood Reporter, "Inside Legoland's New Castle-Themed Hotel," 28 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pull.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pull

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for pull

Verb

Middle English, from Old English pullian; akin to Middle Low German pulen to shell, cull

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Statistics for pull

Last Updated

17 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for pull

The first known use of pull was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for pull

pull

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hold onto and move (someone or something) in a particular direction and especially toward yourself
: to remove (something) by gripping it and using force
: to cause (something you are holding or something that is attached to you) to move with you as you go in a particular direction

pull

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of moving or trying to move something by holding it and bringing it toward you : the act of pulling something
: special influence and power over other people
: an ability or power to attract someone or to make someone want to go somewhere, do something, etc.

pull

verb
\ ˈpu̇l How to pronounce pull (audio) \
pulled; pulling

Kids Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to use force on so as to cause movement toward the force pulled the rope pulling a wagon
2 : to separate from a firm or a natural attachment pull a tooth pull weeds
3 : move entry 1 sense 1 A train pulled out of the station.
4 : to draw apart : tear, rend I pulled a flower to pieces.
5 : to move (something) up or down Pull down the shade.
6 : to operate by drawing toward Going against the current, he had to pull the oars harder.
7 : to stretch repeatedly pull taffy
pull through
: to survive a difficult or dangerous period She was seriously ill, but pulled through.

pull

noun

Kids Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act or an instance of grasping and causing to move two pulls on the cord
2 : a device for making something move
3 : a force that draws one body toward another the pull of gravity
\ ˈpu̇l How to pronounce pull (audio) \

Medical Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : extract sense 1 pull a tooth
2 : to strain or stretch abnormally pull a tendon pull a muscle

pull

noun

Medical Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

: an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching especially of a muscle — see groin pull

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More from Merriam-Webster on pull

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with pull

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for pull

Spanish Central: Translation of pull

Nglish: Translation of pull for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pull for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about pull

Comments on pull

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