pull

verb
\ ˈpu̇l How to pronounce pull (audio) also ˈpəl How to pronounce pull (audio) \
pulled; pulling; pulls

Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to exert force upon so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the force
b : to stretch (cooling candy) repeatedly pull taffy
c : to strain abnormally pull a tendon
d : to hold back (a racehorse) from winning
e : to work (an oar) by drawing back strongly
2a : to draw out from the skin pull feathers from a rooster's tail
b : to pluck from a plant or by the roots pull flowers pull turnips
c : extract pull a tooth
3 : to hit (a ball) toward the left from a right-handed swing or toward the right from a left-handed swing — compare push
4 : to draw apart : rend, tear
5 : to print (something, such as a proof) by impression
6a : to remove from a place or situation pull the engine pulled the pitcher in the third inning pulled the show
b : revoke If they're caught dumping, they'll get their license pulled.— Alexandra Alger
7 : to bring (a weapon) into the open pulled a knife
8a : perform, carry out pull an all-nighter pull guard duty
b : commit, perpetrate pull a robbery pull a prank
9a : put on, assume pull a grin
b : to act or behave in the manner of pulled a Horace Greely and went west— Steve Rushin
10a : to draw the support or attention of : attract pull votes often used with in
b : obtain, secure pulled a B in the course
11 : to demand or obtain an advantage over someone by the assertion of pull rank

intransitive verb

1a : to use force in drawing, dragging, or tugging
b : to move especially through the exercise of mechanical energy the car pulled clear of the rut
c(1) : to take a drink
(2) : to draw hard in smoking pulled at a pipe
d : to strain against the bit
2 : to draw a gun
3 : to admit of being pulled
4 : to feel or express strong sympathy : root pulling for my team to win
5 of an offensive lineman in football : to move back from the line of scrimmage and toward one flank to provide blocking for a ballcarrier
pull a face
: to make a face : grimace
pull a fast one
: to perpetrate a trick or fraud
pull oneself together
: to regain one's composure
pull one's leg
: to deceive someone playfully : hoax
pull one's weight
: to do one's full share of the work
pull punches or less commonly pull a punch
: to refrain from using all the force at one's disposal
pull stakes or pull up stakes
: to move out : leave
pull strings or less commonly pull wires
: to exert hidden influence or control
pull the plug
1 : to disconnect a medical life-support system
2 : to withdraw essential and especially financial support
pull the rug from under
: to weaken or unsettle especially by removing support or assistance from
pull the string
: to throw a changeup
pull the trigger
: to make a decisive move or action
pull the wool over one's eyes
: to blind to the true situation : hoodwink
pull together
: to work in harmony : cooperate

pull

noun, often attributive

Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act or an instance of pulling
b(1) : a draft of liquid
(2) : an inhalation of smoke
c : the effort expended in moving a long pull uphill
d : force required to overcome resistance to pulling a trigger with a four pound pull
e : a competition in which a heavily weighted sled is pulled by participants usually using draft animals or machines a tractor pull the county fair's annual ox pull The truck pull may be one one of the machine age's weirdest mutations. Modified pickup trucks and dragsters are hooked to trailers or "sleds" weighed down with 30,000 to 40,000 pounds … They rev up their engines and slog their way across a 200-foot mud track.
2a : advantage
b : special influence
4 : a device for pulling something or for operating by pulling a drawer pull
5 : a force that attracts, compels, or influences : attraction
6 : an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching a muscle pull a groin pull

Other Words from pull

Verb

puller noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for pull

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of pull in a Sentence

Verb He pulled the door open and ran out. The cat will scratch you if you keep pulling its tail. Make a knot in the rope and pull it tight. Pull the baby's chair closer to the table. She pulled the blanket over her head. We tried pushing and pulling but couldn't get the couch to move. Grab the end of the rope and pull as hard as you can. We spent the morning in the garden pulling weeds. I accidentally pulled one of the buttons off my shirt. He pulled the plug out of the socket. Noun She gave the door a few hard pulls and it opened. Give the rope a pull. He has a lot of pull in local political circles. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The measures have proven especially effective in the technology sector, whose complex global supply chains offer numerous levers for the U.S. government to pull. Dan Strumpf, WSJ, 6 May 2022 Police saw the man’s car pull into a driveway on Arden Avenue. Bob Sandrick, cleveland, 5 May 2022 Some research shows that anti-trans bills, such as those proposed in over 10 Republican-leaning states to ban transgender women from competing on women's sports teams, are working to pull-in Republicans' less racially diverse, older base. Amy Nakamura, USA TODAY, 4 May 2022 The theory was that prices could pull back once glitches and quirks worked their way out of the economic system. Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press, 4 May 2022 Will the rehearsals end in chaos or will the class pull together? Leo Barraclough, Variety, 3 May 2022 Such monetary tightening, which is aimed at dampening inflation, could backfire if consumers and businesses pull back too quickly, according to experts. Aimee Picchi, CBS News, 3 May 2022 Unlike old toms, younger jakes can be plucked whole—just pull the feathers out; there’s no art to it. Hank Shaw, Outside Online, 1 May 2022 After Moss and Jeremy Strong, who will be the next celebrity to get a New Yorker profile that makes their publicist pull their hair out? Brendan Morrow, The Week, 29 Apr. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Reliance on Covid-19 rapid test kits and telehealth visits provide more examples of market pull rising to meet the push of technological innovation. A.j. Ghergich, Forbes, 2 May 2022 These corresponding financial and political forces have created a sort of mutual gravitational pull that has bound car dealers and car companies together for many decades since. Peter Valdes-dapena, CNN, 30 Apr. 2022 Part of the pull of the true story must have been its period. Joe Morgenstern, WSJ, 21 Apr. 2022 That gives it a lot of political pull, but last month Disney CEO Bob Chapek came out against the bill (following unprecedented outrage among workers at his silence about the bill). Chris Morris, Fortune, 19 Apr. 2022 Eventually, after three years of push-pull, Hannah reached breaking point. Lizzie Cernik, refinery29.com, 31 Mar. 2022 Forget about the bulk and annoying zippers that can cause discomfort with all-day wear, the easy pull-on style gives you the comfort of leggings with the look of denim. Raena Loper, Good Housekeeping, 28 Apr. 2022 Those with large yards and a machine with towing capability—like a tractor or riding mower—will appreciate this 40-inch pull-behind dethatcher. Alex Rennie, Popular Mechanics, 28 Apr. 2022 Once an investment gains traction, duplicitous developers execute the famous rug pull, leaving investors with worthless investments. Stu Sjouwerman, Forbes, 27 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pull.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of pull

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for pull

Verb

Middle English, from Old English pullian; akin to Middle Low German pulen to shell, cull

Learn More About pull

Time Traveler for pull

Time Traveler

The first known use of pull was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near pull

Pulkovo

pull

pullable

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for pull

Last Updated

11 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Pull.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pull. Accessed 22 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for pull

pull

verb
\ ˈpu̇l How to pronounce pull (audio) \
pulled; pulling

Kids Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to use force on so as to cause movement toward the force pulled the rope pulling a wagon
2 : to separate from a firm or a natural attachment pull a tooth pull weeds
3 : move entry 1 sense 1 A train pulled out of the station.
4 : to draw apart : tear, rend I pulled a flower to pieces.
5 : to move (something) up or down Pull down the shade.
6 : to operate by drawing toward Going against the current, he had to pull the oars harder.
7 : to stretch repeatedly pull taffy
pull through
: to survive a difficult or dangerous period She was seriously ill, but pulled through.

pull

noun

Kids Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act or an instance of grasping and causing to move two pulls on the cord
2 : a device for making something move
3 : a force that draws one body toward another the pull of gravity

pull

transitive verb
\ ˈpu̇l How to pronounce pull (audio) \

Medical Definition of pull

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : extract sense 1 pull a tooth
2 : to strain or stretch abnormally pull a tendon pull a muscle

pull

noun

Medical Definition of pull (Entry 2 of 2)

: an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching especially of a muscle — see groin pull

More from Merriam-Webster on pull

Nglish: Translation of pull for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pull for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about pull

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