deprive

verb

de·​prive di-ˈprīv How to pronounce deprive (audio)
deprived; depriving

transitive verb

1
: to take something away from
deprived him of his professorshipJ. M. Phalen
the risk of injury when the brain is deprived of oxygen
2
: to withhold something from
deprived a citizen of her rights
3
: to remove from office
the Archbishop … would be deprived and sent to the TowerEdith Sitwell
4
obsolete : remove
'tis honor to deprive dishonored lifeShakespeare

Examples of deprive in a Sentence

working those long hours was depriving him of his sleep a prince who had been deprived after those who opposed the monarchy came to power
Recent Examples on the Web But without light, the plant is critically deprived. Corey Buhay, Smithsonian Magazine, 16 Apr. 2024 We are primed to scold Doug for depriving his girlfriend of a creative outlet and the shoulders of strong female characters to cry on. Jennifer Wilson, The New Yorker, 15 Apr. 2024 That deprives kids of the resilience and emotional fortitude that comes from healthy risk-taking in real life. Lisa Jarvis, Twin Cities, 30 Mar. 2024 Failure to detect it might deprive patients of an opportunity to get treated and to slow down disease progression. Soeren Mattke, Discover Magazine, 28 Mar. 2024 The incident has deprived over 1,000 children of the right to an education, UNICEF said. Jacqueline Charles, Miami Herald, 27 Mar. 2024 In a March 19 filing to the NLRB, attorneys representing Star Garden argued that dancers have refused to perform lap dances, depriving the club of income. Suhauna Hussain, Los Angeles Times, 26 Mar. 2024 The closure comes during prime cruising season, depriving waterfront businesses of tourist dollars. Rachel Weiner, Washington Post, 26 Mar. 2024 In March, environmental activists set fire to infrastructure near that same factory, depriving Tesla of sufficient operation power and again causing a pause in production. Lora Kolodny, NBC News, 2 Apr. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'deprive.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English depriven, from Anglo-French depriver, from Medieval Latin deprivare, from Latin de- + privare to deprive — more at private entry 1

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

Time Traveler
The first known use of deprive was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near deprive

Cite this Entry

“Deprive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deprive. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

deprive

verb
de·​prive di-ˈprīv How to pronounce deprive (audio)
deprived; depriving
1
: to take something away from
deprive a ruler of power
2
: to stop from having something
deprived of sleep by street noises
deprivation
ˌdep-rə-ˈvā-shən
noun

Medical Definition

deprive

transitive verb
de·​prive di-ˈprīv How to pronounce deprive (audio)
deprived; depriving
: to take something away from and especially something that is usually considered essential for mental or physical well-being
a child deprived of emotional support
tissue deprived of oxygen

Legal Definition

deprive

transitive verb
de·​prive
deprived; depriving
: to take away or withhold something from
no person shall…be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of lawU.S. Constitution amend. V

More from Merriam-Webster on deprive

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