revive

verb

re·​vive ri-ˈvīv How to pronounce revive (audio)
revived; reviving

intransitive verb

: to return to consciousness or life : become active or flourishing again

transitive verb

1
: to restore to consciousness or life
2
: to restore from a depressed, inactive, or unused state : bring back
3
: to renew in the mind or memory
revivable adjective
reviver noun

Examples of revive in a Sentence

The success of the movie has revived her career. The government is trying to revive the economy. Our spirits were revived by his enthusiasm. The store's business is beginning to revive. The family is trying to revive an old custom. He has decided to revive Molière's Tartuffe. See More
Recent Examples on the Web The death of Megan Andrews — a 66-year-old who many described as a shining light in the community — has rattled the small village of Key Biscayne and revived longstanding concerns from many who have worried about the impact on pedestrian safety amid the rising popularity of e-bikes. Ana Ceballos, Miami Herald, 22 Feb. 2024 Recent battlefield gains by CNA and other rebels have revived hopes that this future is possible. Aakash Hassan, The Christian Science Monitor, 22 Feb. 2024 But Biden is brushing up against opposition from former President Donald Trump, the Republican front-runner who ascended to the White House in 2016 on the promise of reviving U.S. manufacturing. Jamie Stengle, Fortune, 21 Feb. 2024 How freeing rivers can help California ease flood risks and revive ecosystems. Ryan Fonseca, Los Angeles Times, 21 Feb. 2024 Most of those civilian casualties were caused by anti-vehicle mines planted in areas where Ukrainians were trying to revive their farms. Elizabeth Both, NBC News, 20 Feb. 2024 These calls to revive the two-state solution may come from good intentions. Marc Lynch, Foreign Affairs, 20 Feb. 2024 Over a decade later, the show was revived, with season 21 premiering in 2022. Katie Mannion, Peoplemag, 17 Feb. 2024 As mayor, Oscar Goodman doubled down on his flamboyant public image and focused on cleaning up and reviving the city's downtown, expanding on the efforts of the previous decade's building boom, which had created the modern Las Vegas strip. Dana Jacobson, CBS News, 10 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'revive.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French revivre, from Latin revivere to live again, from re- + vivere to live — more at quick entry 1

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Time Traveler
The first known use of revive was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near revive

Cite this Entry

“Revive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/revive. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

revive

verb
re·​vive ri-ˈvīv How to pronounce revive (audio)
revived; reviving
1
: to make (someone or something) strong, active, or healthy again
2
: to bring back into use or popularity
trying to revive an old custom
reviver noun

Medical Definition

revive

verb
re·​vive ri-ˈvīv How to pronounce revive (audio)
revived; reviving

intransitive verb

: to return to consciousness or life

transitive verb

1
: to restore to consciousness or life
2
: to restore from a depressed, inactive, or unused state
revivable adjective

Legal Definition

revive

transitive verb
re·​vive ri-ˈvīv How to pronounce revive (audio)
revived; reviving
: to restore the force, effect, or validity of (as a contract, will, or action)

More from Merriam-Webster on revive

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