derivative

noun
de·​riv·​a·​tive | \ di-ˈri-və-tiv How to pronounce derivative (audio) \

Definition of derivative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 linguistics : a word formed from another word or base : a word formed by derivation "pointy," "pointed," and other derivatives of "point"
2 : something derived … the sonata form (itself a derivative of opera) …— Kingsley Martin the name "Mia" is a derivative of "Maria"
3 mathematics : the limit of the ratio of the change in a function to the corresponding change in its independent variable as the latter change approaches zero

4 chemistry

a : a chemical substance related structurally to another substance and theoretically derivable from it
b : a substance that can be made from another substance Petroleum is a derivative of coal tar. soybean derivatives
5 : a contract or security (see security sense 3) that derives its value from that of an underlying asset (such as another security) or from the value of a rate (as of interest or currency exchange) or index (see index entry 1 sense 1b) of asset value (such as a stock index)

derivative

adjective

Definition of derivative (Entry 2 of 2)

1 linguistics : formed from another word or base : formed by derivation a derivative word
2 : having parts that originate from another source : made up of or marked by derived elements a derivative philosophy
3 : lacking originality : banal a derivative performance a film using a derivative plot device

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Other Words from derivative

Adjective

derivatively adverb
derivativeness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for derivative

Synonyms: Noun

by-product, derivate, derivation, offshoot, outgrowth, spin-off

Synonyms: Adjective

secondary, secondhand

Antonyms: Noun

origin, root, source

Antonyms: Adjective

basic, original

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Examples of derivative in a Sentence

Noun

The word “childish” is a derivative of “child.” Tofu is one of many soybean derivatives. Petroleum is a derivative of coal tar.

Adjective

A number of critics found the film derivative and predictable. His style seems too derivative of Hemingway.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The new formula also contains 5 percent magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, a new, more stable vitamin C derivative. Leah Prinzivalli, Allure, "Glossier Is Relaunching Its Famous Supers Serums in a Larger Size — Without Upping the Price," 13 May 2019 Martin Rogers has been regularly trading options from his mobile phone since last summer, after dabbling in stocks and derivatives for years. Gunjan Banerji, WSJ, "The Day Traders Are Back, Now Playing With Options," 11 May 2019 Refiners in those countries turned that oil into gasoline and diesel or feedstock for chemical plants to produce plastics and other petroleum derivatives. Bloomberg.com, "A Mideast Energy Giant Seizes New Energy Future," 10 May 2018 French bank BNP Paribas SA will offer the derivatives to both institutions... Justin Baer, WSJ, "BNP Paribas and Peter Thiel-Backed Company Team Up to Sell Unicorn Shares," 3 Apr. 2019 What’s more, these skin-smoothing vitamin A derivatives break down in sunlight, so putting them on in the morning diminishes their efficacy (and may increase irritation, too). Jenn Sinrich, SELF, "Why You Need a Different Skin-Care Routine at Night," 7 Sep. 2018 Since those are typically made from natural gas or petroleum derivatives, their price will depend on fossil fuel costs. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Bikes, bowling balls, and the delicate balancing act that is modern recycling," 31 Dec. 2018 But Verso's formula contains a gentle derivative, called Retinol 8, that can reduce the appearance of fine lines around the mouth overtime. Jenna Rosenstein, Harper's BAZAAR, "The Anti-Aging Guide for Lips," 6 Nov. 2018 The question is whether the floodgates will now open for companies seeking drug approvals that involve marijuana derivatives, whether to treat neurological conditions or movement disorders or even chronic pain. Sy Mukherjee, Fortune, "Brainstorm Health: FDA Marijuana-Based Drug Approval, Pharma Innovation, GSK Shingles Vaccine," 25 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

The complaint, filed in Lake County Circuit Court, alleges that the fire and explosion at the company, which manufactures silicon derivative products, resulted in an unknown amount of chemicals being released into the air, causing air pollution. Frank Abderholden, Lake County News-Sun, "State and Lake County file suit to ensure cleanup following Waukegan factory explosion," 3 June 2019 Nervous investors dumped shares rather than hedging their risk in synthetic ways, boosting cash trades but sapping demand for derivative products that make more money for the bank. Liz Hoffman, WSJ, "Goldman’s M&A Bankers Shine, Traders Stumble as Malaysian Scandal Looms," 16 Jan. 2019 The natural place to start, though, is Blackout, the newest part of the Call of Duty package, both the most derivative and the most distinct mode on offer. Julie Muncy, Ars Technica, "Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 review: War games, now with battle royale!," 19 Oct. 2018 And as the show went on, the clothing hit a prism and went into a rainbow effect, which was derivative of the birth of Technicolor in The Wizard of Oz—a movie that starts in black-and-white. Jonathan Van Meter, Vogue, "“My Job Is To Be a Spirit Leader”: Behind the Scenes with Virgil Abloh," 14 May 2019 Interestingly, the mushrooms themselves are not scheduled, even though their derivative hallucinogenic drugs are. Allure, "Your Guide to Microdosing for Anxiety and Depression," 19 Apr. 2019 He is also charged with damaging Nissan by making the company take over a personal derivative contract designed to protect Mr. Ghosn against a fall in the Japanese yen. Peter Landers, WSJ, "Carlos Ghosn to Stay in Jail After Tokyo Court Denies Bail Again," 17 Jan. 2019 Whannell steals from so many different movies—and does it so cheerfully—that Upgrade stops feeling derivative and starts looking like a collage, with the recycled elements forming a new sensibility. Ben Sachs, Chicago Reader, "Upgrade is so derivative, it’s original," 14 June 2018 Violet cress is actually closer to rapeseed and its derivative, canola. John Wenz, Popular Mechanics, "This Purple Plant Has a Secret That Could Replace Synthetic Engine Oil," 27 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'derivative.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of derivative

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

circa 1530, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for derivative

Noun

see derive

Adjective

see derive

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Statistics for derivative

Last Updated

7 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for derivative

The first known use of derivative was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for derivative

derivative

noun

Financial Definition of derivative

What It Is

A derivative is a financial contract with a value that is derived from an underlying asset. Derivatives have no direct value in and of themselves -- their value is based on the expected future price movements of their underlying asset.

How It Works

Derivatives are often used as an instrument to hedge risk for one party of a contract, while offering the potential for high returns for the other party. Derivatives have been created to mitigate a remarkable number of risks: fluctuations in stock, bond, commodity, and index prices; changes in foreign exchange rates; changes in interest rates; and weather events, to name a few.

One of the most commonly used derivatives is the option. Let's look at an example:

Say Company XYZ is involved in the production of pre-packaged foods. They are a large consumer of flour and other commodities, which are subject to volatile price movements.

In order for the company to assure any kind of consistency with their product and meet their bottom-line objectives, they need to be able to purchase commodities at a predictable and market-friendly rate.  In order to do this, company XYZ would enter into an options contract with farmers or wheat producers to buy a certain amount of their crop at a certain price during an agreed upon period of time. If the price of wheat, for whatever reason, goes above the threshold, then Company XYZ can exercise the option and purchase the asset at the strike price. Company XYZ pays a premium for this privilege, but receives protection in return for one of their most important input costs. If XYZ decides not to exercise its option, the producer is free to sell the asset at market value to any buyer. In the end, the partnership acts as a win-win for both parties: Company XYZ is guaranteed a competitive price for the commodity, while the producer is assured of a fair value for its goods.

In this example, the value of the option is "derived" from an underlying asset; in this case, a certain number of bushels of wheat.

Other common derivatives include futures, forwards and swaps.

Why It Matters

As often is the case in trading, the more risk you undertake the more reward you stand to gain. Derivatives can be used on both sides of the equation, to either reduce risk or assume risk with the possibility of a commensurate reward.

This is where derivatives have received such notoriety as of late: in the dark art of speculating through derivatives. Speculators who enter into a derivative contract are essentially betting that the future price of the asset will be substantially different from the expected price held by the other member of the contract. They operate under the assumption that the party seeking insurance has it wrong in regard to the future market price, and look to profit from the error.

Contrary to popular opinion, though, derivatives are not inherently bad. In fact, they are a necessity for many companies to ensure profits in volatile markets or provide mitigated risk for everyday investors looking for investment insurance.

Source: Investing Answers

derivative

noun

English Language Learners Definition of derivative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a word formed from another word
: something that comes from something else : a substance that is made from another substance

derivative

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of derivative (Entry 2 of 2)

usually disapproving : made up of parts from something else : not new or original
: formed from another word

derivative

noun
de·​riv·​a·​tive | \ di-ˈri-və-tiv How to pronounce derivative (audio) \

Kids Definition of derivative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a word formed from an earlier word or root The word “Childhood” is a derivative of “child.”
2 : something that is formed from something else Gasoline is a derivative of petroleum.

derivative

adjective

Kids Definition of derivative (Entry 2 of 2)

: formed from something else a derivative product

Other Words from derivative

derivatively adverb

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derivative

adjective
de·​riv·​a·​tive | \ di-ˈriv-ət-iv How to pronounce derivative (audio) \

Medical Definition of derivative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : formed by derivation
2 : made up of or marked by derived elements

derivative

noun

Medical Definition of derivative (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that is obtained from, grows out of, or results from an earlier or more fundamental state or condition
2a : a chemical substance related structurally to another substance and theoretically derivable from it
b : a substance that can be made from another substance

derivative

noun
de·​riv·​a·​tive | \ də-ˈri-və-tiv How to pronounce derivative (audio) \

Legal Definition of derivative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a contract or security that derives its value from that of an underlying asset (as another security) or from the value of a rate (as of interest or currency exchange) or index of asset value (as a stock index)

Note: Derivatives often take the form of customized contracts transacted outside of security exchanges, while other contracts, such as standard index options and futures, are openly traded on such exchanges. Derivatives often involve a forward contract.

derivative

adjective

Legal Definition of derivative (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : arising out of or dependent on the existence of something else — compare direct
2 : of, relating to, or being a derivative a derivative transaction

Other Words from derivative

derivatively adverb

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Comments on derivative

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