stage

noun
\ˈstāj \

Definition of stage 

(Entry 1 of 3)

1a : one of a series of positions or stations one above the other : step

b : the height of the surface of a river above an arbitrary zero point flood stage

2a(1) : a raised platform

(2) : the part of a theater on which the acting takes place and which often includes the wings

(3) : the acting profession : the theater as an occupation or activity

(4) : soundstage

b : a center of attention or scene of action

3a : a scaffold for workmen

b : the small platform of a microscope on which an object is placed for examination

4a : a place of rest formerly provided for those traveling by stagecoach : station

b : the distance between two stopping places on a road

c : stagecoach

5a : a period or step in a process, activity, or development: such as

(1) : one of the distinguishable periods of growth and development of a plant or animal the larval stage of an insect

(2) : a period or phase in the course of a disease also : the degree of involvement or severity of a disease

b : one passing through a (specified) stage

6 : an element or part of an electronic device (such as an amplifier)

7 : one of two or more sections of a rocket that have their own fuel and engine

on the stage

: in or into the acting profession

stage

verb
staged; staging

Definition of stage (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to produce (something, such as a play) on a stage

2 : to produce or cause to happen for public view or public effect stage a track meet stage a hunger strike

3 : to determine the phase or severity of (a disease) based on a classification of established symptomatic criteria also : to evaluate (a patient) to determine the phase, severity, or progression of a disease

stage

adjective

Definition of stage (Entry 3 of 3)

: intended to represent a type or stereotype a stage Irishman a stage French accent

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Other Words from stage

Noun

stageful \ ˈstāj-​ˌfu̇l \ noun
stagelike \ ˈstāj-​ˌlīk \ adjective

Verb

stageable \ ˈstā-​jə-​bəl \ adjective

Synonyms for stage

Synonyms: Noun

drama, dramatics, theater (or theatre), theatricals, theatrics

Synonyms: Verb

carry, give, mount, offer, present

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Examples of stage in a Sentence

Noun

an early stage of the disease children at the same stage of development The actors walked out onto the stage. He was on stage for the entire show. He has no intention of leaving the political stage. The company wants to compete on the world stage.

Verb

The school stages two plays each year. The students staged a protest. The school is staging a track meet. The prisoners are staging a hunger strike. The photograph of the two leaders shaking hands was deliberately staged. His career as a singer appeared to be over, but then he staged a comeback.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Hunchback of Notre Dame Bay Area Musicals presents Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz’s musical stage adaptation of the classic underdog tale of a deformed bell-ringer who finds love and saves his community. SFChronicle.com, "Theater capsule reviews and listings, week of July 15," 12 July 2018 Also in the pipeline for van Hove in 2019 is a London stage adaptation of the classic Bette Davis backstage drama All About Eve. David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter, "Tony Winner Ivo van Hove to Direct 'West Side Story' on Broadway (Exclusive)," 12 July 2018 Alice in Wonderland is a favorite for stage adaptations -- what drew you to it? Curtis M. Wong, Billboard, "Duncan Sheik & Steven Sater on Their New Wonderland-Inspired Musical 'Alice by Heart': 'It Feels a Lot Like 2018'," 5 July 2018 Croatia's 3-0 win over Argentina was a standout performance in the group stage. Graham Dunbar, courant.com, "A Youthful France Faces Veteran-Laden Croatia For World Cup," 14 July 2018 Some Serbs — whose team didn’t make it past the group stage — joked about Croatia being a better team, with a popular post on social media declaring that Serbia’s biggest success recently in soccer was being a neighbor to a World Cup finalist. Washington Post, "Mixed emotions in Balkans over Croatia’s World Cup success," 13 July 2018 Some Serbs — whose team didn't make it past the group stage — joked about Croatia being a better team, with a popular post on social media declaring that Serbia's biggest success recently in soccer was being a neighbor to a World Cup finalist. Jovana Gec, Fox News, "Mixed emotions in Balkans over Croatia's World Cup success," 13 July 2018 MODRIC MAGIC Luka Modric outperformed Lionel Messi when Croatia went head-to-head with Argentina during the group stage and since then he’s outplayed everyone else too. Martin Rogers, USA TODAY, "How the World Cup final between France and Croatia will be won," 13 July 2018 Both Portugal and England appeared to adhere to that in the group stage, with both making sure to keep one player on the opposing side's half of the field while celebrating dramatic goals. Charlotte Carroll, SI.com, "WATCH: England Tried to Score While Croatia Was Celebrating Go-Ahead Goal," 12 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, won praise in Utah for helping to rescue what had been a troubled effort to stage the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City in 2002. Herb Jackson, USA TODAY, "2018 primaries: Voters have their say in Colorado, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, Oklahoma, Utah and South Carolina," 26 June 2018 Why did Beyoncé and Jay-Z decide to stage their reconciliation track at the world’s most visited museum? Jason Farago, New York Times, "At the Louvre, Beyoncé and Jay-Z Are Both Outsiders and Heirs," 17 June 2018 The fact that the police tried to clamp down on their protest cemented determination to stage another, even bigger parade soon—and so Mardi Gras was born. Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Sydney Became an LGBTQ Destination," 13 June 2018 The Bucks will take occupancy during the summer, and, following weeks of testing and settling in, plan to stage a grand opening in late summer. James B. Nelson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "New drone video of Milwaukee Bucks arena: Building nearly finished, plaza work ramps up," 3 May 2018 Last week, nine schools in the West Valley closed after a wave of teachers called in sick to stage a #RedForEd rally at the Capitol. Brieanna J Frank, azcentral, "LIVE COVERAGE: #RedForEd Arizona teachers rally at state Capitol for higher pay," 28 Mar. 2018 Uruguay famously got sulky over the shortage of European teams at the first World Cup and refused to travel over for the 1934 tournament, and Argentina joined them four years later when FIFA decided to stage a second consecutive World Cup in Europe. SI.com, "World Cup Countdown: 13 Weeks to Go - African Boycott Denies Ghana's Golden Generation in 1966," 22 Mar. 2018 The show costs about $35,000 to stage, with the money coming from sponsorships and tax dollars. Leah Brennan, Columbia Flier, "Yes, there's an app for Howard's sparkling July 4 fireworks," 25 June 2018 New Lenox initially planned to stage its show July 6, but a second bout of heavy rain July 5 caused the fireworks to be water-damaged. Susan Demar Lafferty, Daily Southtown, "New Lenox reschedules fireworks," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1879, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1824, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stage

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French estage abode, story of a building, state, from Vulgar Latin *staticum, from Latin stare to stand — more at stand

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Statistics for stage

Last Updated

11 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stage

The first known use of stage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for stage

stage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a particular point or period in the growth or development of something

: a raised platform in a theater, auditorium, etc., where the performers stand

: the art or profession of acting and especially of acting in theaters

stage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to produce (a play, performance, etc.) on a stage

: to organize and produce (a public event)

: to arrange or do (something that is intended to get a lot of public attention)

stage

noun
\ˈstāj \

Kids Definition of stage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a raised floor (as for speaking or performing)

2 : a step forward in a journey, a task, a process, or a development : phase “The plan is still in its early stages …”— E. B. White, Charlotte's Web

3 : the theatrical profession or art

4 : a place where something important happens the political stage

stage

verb
staged; staging

Kids Definition of stage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to produce or show to others on or as if on the stage The drama club staged two plays. The schools staged a track meet.

stage

noun
\ˈstāj \

Medical Definition of stage 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a period or step in a process, activity, or development: as

a : one of the distinguishable periods of growth and development of a plant or animal the larval stage of an insect

b : a period or phase in the course of a disease the rash stage of Lyme disease— R. H. Boyle also : the degree of involvement or severity of a disease advanced stage II or III disease (more than 10 positive lymph nodes found after axillary dissection) — M. S. Anscher et al

c : one of two or more operations performed at different times but constituting a single procedure a two-stage thoracoplasty

d : any of the four degrees indicating depth of general anesthesia

2 : the small platform of a microscope on which an object is placed for examination

staged; staging

Medical Definition of stage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to determine the phase or severity of (a disease) based on a classification of established symptomatic criteria also : to evaluate (a patient) to determine the phase, severity, or progression of a disease

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Comments on stage

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