raise

verb
\ ˈrāz How to pronounce raise (audio) \
raised; raising

Definition of raise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cause or help to rise to a standing position
b : to stir up : incite raise a rebellion
c : to flush (game) from cover
d : to recall from or as if from death
3a : to set upright by lifting or building raise a monument
b : to lift up raise your hand raise sunken treasure
c : to place higher in rank or dignity : elevate
d : heighten, invigorate raise the spirits
e : to end or suspend the operation or validity of raise a siege
4 : to get together for a purpose : collect raise funds
5a : grow, cultivate raise cotton
b : to bring to maturity : rear raise a child
c : to breed and bring (an animal) to maturity
6a : to give rise to : provoke raise a commotion
b : to give voice to raise a cheer
7 : to bring up for consideration or debate raise an issue
8a : to increase the strength, intensity, or pitch of don't raise your voice
b : to increase the degree of
c : to cause to rise in level or amount raise the rent
d(1) : to increase the amount of (a poker bet)
(2) : to bet more than (a previous bettor)
e(1) : to make a higher bridge bid in (a partner's suit)
(2) : to increase the bid of (one's partner)
9 : to make light and porous raise dough
10 : to cause to ascend raise the dust
11 : to multiply (a quantity) by itself a specified number of times raise two to the fourth power
12 : to bring in sight on the horizon by approaching raise land
13a : to bring up the nap of (cloth)
b : to cause (something, such as a blister) to form on the skin
14 : to increase the nominal value of fraudulently raise a check
15 : to articulate (a sound) with the tongue in a higher position
16 : to establish radio communication with

intransitive verb

1 dialect : rise
2 : to increase a bet or bid
raise Cain or raise hell
1 : to act wildly : create a disturbance
2 : to scold or upbraid someone especially loudly raised hell with the umpire
raise eyebrows
: to cause surprise or mild disapproval
raise the bar
: to set a higher standard new software that raises the bar for competitors

raise

noun

Definition of raise (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an act of raising or lifting
2 : a rising stretch of road : an upward grade : rise
3 : an increase in amount: such as
a : an increase of a bet or bid
b : an increase in wages or salary
4 : a vertical or inclined opening or passageway connecting one mine working area with another at a higher level

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Other Words from raise

Verb

raiser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for raise

Verb

lift, raise, rear, elevate, hoist, heave, boost mean to move from a lower to a higher place or position. lift usually implies exerting effort to overcome resistance of weight. lift the chair while I vacuum raise carries a stronger implication of bringing up to the vertical or to a high position. scouts raising a flagpole rear may add an element of suddenness to raise. suddenly reared itself up on its hind legs elevate may replace lift or raise especially when exalting or enhancing is implied. elevated the taste of the public hoist implies lifting something heavy especially by mechanical means. hoisted the cargo on board heave implies lifting and throwing with great effort or strain. heaved the heavy crate inside boost suggests assisting to climb or advance by a push. boosted his brother over the fence

Examples of raise in a Sentence

Verb Raise your hand if you know the answer. Raise your arms above your head. He raised his head and looked around. She raised her eyes from her book and stared at him. He raised the cup to his lips and drank. I raised the lid and peeked inside. Let's raise the windows and get some fresh air in here. We raised the flag to the top of the pole. I carefully raised her to a sitting position. She raised herself onto her knees. Noun the school board approved a raise in the maximum family income for students qualifying for reduced-price lunches
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb One of those goals is to raise the standard of living of lower-income workers in retirement. Tom Margenau, Dallas News, "Unnecessary legislation: The WEP should not be repealed," 6 Sep. 2020 In both cities, his job was to raise the number of Black and Latino city workers to reflect the city's population better. Star Tribune, "Police shooting spotlights police spending in Wisconsin," 5 Sep. 2020 At first, the intention was to raise money for the members of Soul Project. Keith Spera, NOLA.com, "Live from the Funky Uncle Lounge: Krewe of Tucks float hosts weekly livestreaming concerts," 3 Sep. 2020 Another idea is to raise funds for body cameras for police in municipalities that can’t afford them. Jarrett Bell, USA TODAY, "Opinion: Ravens' call to action is a lesson on social justice for NFL's power brokers," 29 Aug. 2020 The plan is to raise money from investors and use it to buy into another company, typically a private one that’s yet to be chosen. Crystal Tse, Bloomberg.com, "Blank Check IPOs, the Status Symbol of 2020, Have Raised $32 Billion This Year," 27 Aug. 2020 The goal is not to raise prices for consumers, but to ensure that the economy is operating at full potential. Joseph Lawler, Washington Examiner, "In major strategy overhaul, Fed opens door to higher inflation to pursue stronger recoveries," 27 Aug. 2020 The goal is to raise up to $100,000 to help support two or three scholarships a year. oregonlive, "Portland’s first Black woman cop now ‘ the inspiration’ for a new PCC criminal justice scholarship," 23 Aug. 2020 The impact of extreme restrictions on manufacturing would be to substantially raise prices that U.S. consumers and companies pay, making this politically unpalatable. Kislaya Prasad, Fortune, "The Chinese and U.S. Internets are drifting apart. Why that’s bad for the whole world," 21 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The bump up to the active roster comes with a pay raise for Week 1 from $12,000 to $61,764. Dallas News, "Cowboys elevate DB Brandon Carr from practice squad to active roster," 12 Sep. 2020 Could workers get a raise under Trump's payroll tax plan? Aimee Picchi, CBS News, "Didn't get $500 stimulus check for your children? IRS says to apply now," 14 Aug. 2020 An incoming police officer in Covington was making $31,000 a year before Johnson introduced a $1,000 pay raise for all city employees shortly into his term. Andrew Canulette, NOLA.com, "Covington water and sewer rates will increase, savings to boost police pay," 11 Aug. 2020 The state's lawmakers did receive a $1,600 pay raise last year after the House chose not to concur with a Senate action to prevent the increase. Ella Lee, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Illinois governor didn't scheme to give 'politician buddies' raises amid pandemic," 1 Aug. 2020 The special teams standout-turned-record setting running back would like a $2 million raise. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "Should 49ers offer Raheem Mostert more money? Much bigger questions loom," 9 July 2020 That might not sound like much, but a $3 raise with a 40-hour workweek puts $120 more in each weekly paycheck — life-changing for people like me struggling to make ends meet. Marilyn Sorenson, The Denver Post, "Guest Commentary: I’m a home-care worker and the new minimum wage has improved my life," 30 Jan. 2020 Despite a pay raise averaging $500,000 per year, there is a certain relativity to college basketball salaries. Mark Zeigler, San Diego Union-Tribune, "San Diego State signs basketball coach Brian Dutcher to 6-year extension," 4 Sep. 2020 Rodney Anderson, the Dallas County Republican Party chairman, called the mere suggestion of a raise absurd. Nic Garcia, Dallas News, "Dallas County commissioners reject raises for elected officials amid COVID pandemic," 1 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'raise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of raise

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1538, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for raise

Verb

Middle English reisen, raisen, from Old Norse reisa — more at rear

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Time Traveler for raise

Time Traveler

The first known use of raise was in the 13th century

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Statistics for raise

Last Updated

19 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Raise.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/raise. Accessed 28 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for raise

raise

verb
How to pronounce raise (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of raise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to lift or move (something or someone) to a higher position
: to lift or move (something or someone) to a standing or more upright position
: to increase the amount or level of (something)

raise

noun

English Language Learners Definition of raise (Entry 2 of 2)

US : an increase in the amount of your pay

raise

verb
\ ˈrāz How to pronounce raise (audio) \
raised; raising

Kids Definition of raise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cause to rise : lift Please raise your hand.
2 : collect sense 1 The school is trying to raise money.
3 : to look after the growth and development of : grow The farmer raised hogs.
4 : to bring up a child : rear He was raised by his grandmother.
5 : to bring to notice No one raised any objection.
6 : increase entry 1 They're raising the rent.
7 : to make louder Don't raise your voice.
8 : to give life to : arouse The children made enough noise to raise the dead.
9 : to set upright by lifting or building A monument was raised.
10 : promote sense 1, elevate She was raised to captain.
11 : to give rise to : provoke The joke raised a laugh.
12 : to make light and airy Yeast can raise dough.
13 : to cause to form on the skin The burn raised a blister.

Other Words from raise

raiser noun

raise

noun

Kids Definition of raise (Entry 2 of 2)

: an increase in amount (as of pay)

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Comments on raise

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