cultivate

verb
cul·​ti·​vate | \ ˈkəl-tə-ˌvāt How to pronounce cultivate (audio) \
cultivated; cultivating

Essential Meaning of cultivate

1 : to prepare and use (soil) for growing plants Prehistoric peoples settled the area and began to cultivate the land. Some of the fields are cultivated while others lie fallow.
2 : to grow and care for (plants) a plant that is cultivated for its fruit They survived by cultivating vegetables and grain.
3 : to grow or raise (something) under conditions that you can control pearls from cultivated oysters

Full Definition of cultivate

transitive verb

1 : to prepare or prepare and use for the raising of crops Some fields are cultivated while others lie fallow. also : to loosen or break up the soil about (growing plants)
2a : to foster the growth of cultivate vegetables cultivate coffee
b : culture sense 2a cultivate oysters for pearls
c : to improve by labor, care, or study : refine cultivate the mind cultivated a reputation as a hard-core wheeler-dealer …— Kit Boss
3 : further, encourage cultivate the arts
4 : to seek the society of : make friends with looking for influential people to cultivate as friends

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Other Words from cultivate

cultivatable \ ˈkəl-​tə-​ˌvā-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce cultivate (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for cultivate

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Examples of cultivate in a Sentence

Prehistoric peoples settled the area and began to cultivate the land. Some of the fields are cultivated while others lie fallow. a plant that is cultivated for its fruit They survived by cultivating vegetables and grain. He has carefully cultivated his image. She cultivated a taste for fine wines.
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Recent Examples on the Web The result has been a hand-in-hand approach to relax outdated regulations and cultivate an environment in which brewing companies and the city thrive in terms of economics, job creation, and tourism. Brandon Hernández, San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Sep. 2021 China’s decision to limit the amount of time kids can play online videogames is its latest move to rein in the technology industry and cultivate youth morality, no matter how intrusively. Julie Jargon, WSJ, 4 Sep. 2021 Based on my experience, here are a few top ways nonprofit leaders can cultivate high-performance teams that impact the bottom line all through positive company culture. Nancy Padberg, Forbes, 2 Sep. 2021 In the opening moments of the pilot, for instance, Cedric the Entertainer plays Fraciscan friar Junípero Serra, who was the first person to plant and cultivate European grapes in California during the 18th century. Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone, 30 Aug. 2021 That, combined with the collective leadership style installed after Mao, had allowed the nine members of the Politburo Standing Committee -- the party's innermost circle -- to each cultivate their own turf of unrivaled power. Ben Westcott And Cnn Staff, CNN, 25 July 2021 The Blazers brought in six freshmen in the offseason and added Mississippi Gulf Coast transfer Keshawn Moore within the last two weeks, creating a large group of linemen to develop and cultivate. Evan Dudley, al, 23 July 2021 During normal summers, the Monteverde Institute, another local non-profit environmental group, welcomes students from around the world to partake in its reforestation program, helping cultivate nurseries and plant and distribute trees. Megan Zhang, Condé Nast Traveler, 16 July 2021 Physical changes also help cultivate health and safety within the workplace culture by positively influencing office behavior. Johnny C. Taylor Jr., USA TODAY, 6 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cultivate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cultivate

1588, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cultivate

Medieval Latin cultivatus, past participle of cultivare, from cultivus cultivable, from Latin cultus, past participle of colere — see cult

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Time Traveler for cultivate

Time Traveler

The first known use of cultivate was in 1588

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Dictionary Entries Near cultivate

cultivar

cultivate

cultivated

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Statistics for cultivate

Last Updated

10 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cultivate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cultivate. Accessed 20 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for cultivate

cultivate

verb
cul·​ti·​vate | \ ˈkəl-tə-ˌvāt How to pronounce cultivate (audio) \
cultivated; cultivating

Kids Definition of cultivate

1 : to prepare land for the raising of crops cultivate a field
2 : to raise or assist the growth of crops by tilling or by labor and care cultivate corn
3 : to improve or develop by careful attention, training, or study : devote time and thought to He's trying to cultivate a better attitude.
4 : to seek the company and friendship of As soon as Johnny began to cultivate Dove, he was surprised at the response.— Esther Forbes, Johnny Tremain

cultivate

transitive verb
cul·​ti·​vate | \ ˈkəl-tə-ˌvāt How to pronounce cultivate (audio) \
cultivated; cultivating

Medical Definition of cultivate

: culture sense 1 viruses cultivated in brain tissue

More from Merriam-Webster on cultivate

Nglish: Translation of cultivate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cultivate for Arabic Speakers

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