boost

verb
\ ˈbüst How to pronounce boost (audio) \
boosted; boosting; boosts

Definition of boost

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to push or shove up from below boosted him up over the fence
2 : increase, raise plans to boost production an extra holiday to boost morale
3 : to promote the cause or interests of : plug a campaign to boost the new fashions
4 : to raise the voltage of or across (an electric circuit)
5 slang : steal, shoplift

boost

noun

Definition of boost (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a push upward gave her a boost into the saddle
2 : an act that brings help or encouragement : assist an innovation that has been a boost to the entire industry
3 : an increase in amount a boost in prices

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Synonyms & Antonyms for boost

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for boost

Verb

lift, raise, rear, elevate, hoist, heave, boost mean to move from a lower to a higher place or position. lift usually implies exerting effort to overcome resistance of weight. lift the chair while I vacuum raise carries a stronger implication of bringing up to the vertical or to a high position. scouts raising a flagpole rear may add an element of suddenness to raise. suddenly reared itself up on its hind legs elevate may replace lift or raise especially when exalting or enhancing is implied. elevated the taste of the public hoist implies lifting something heavy especially by mechanical means. hoisted the cargo on board heave implies lifting and throwing with great effort or strain. heaved the heavy crate inside boost suggests assisting to climb or advance by a push. boosted his brother over the fence

Examples of boost in a Sentence

Verb She boosted the boy onto his father's shoulders. boosted the child into her car seat Noun a boost in wheat production Exercise can sometimes provide a boost of energy. After layoffs at the company, employees needed a boost in morale. One company's innovation has proven to be a boost to the entire industry. Give the boy a boost onto the stage, will you?
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But the flip side is that the moment appears to have passed when bond markets were giving the government an all-clear signal to do whatever was necessary to boost the economy, essentially making endless funding available at extraordinarily low cost. New York Times, "What the Bond Market Is Telling Us About the Biden Economy," 23 Feb. 2021 Beyond buoying drillers in the region, however, the plant may do little to boost the local economy. Popular Science, "A trip down the Ohio River reveals the oil and gas industry’s next big move," 23 Feb. 2021 Behind their rise: confidence among investors that heavy stimulus and coronavirus vaccine deployment will boost the economy. Marco Quiroz-gutierrez, WSJ, "Historic Gains in Small Stocks Highlight Investor Exuberance," 22 Feb. 2021 Critics saw the launch of the docket as a mechanism to boost fossil fuels at the behest of the Trump administration. Josh Siegel, Washington Examiner, "Top Republican energy regulator criticizes party for blaming Texas crisis on frozen wind turbines," 17 Feb. 2021 Several adjustments had been made over the past decade to try to boost diversity at the prestigious magnet school, which has been predominantly Asian for many years, while its Black and Hispanic student populations continue to dwindle. Annie Vainshtein, San Francisco Chronicle, "S.F.'s Lowell isn't the only selective school to come under fire. Here's a look at others across U.S.," 11 Feb. 2021 With this device the best flight profiles are worked out ahead of time, including the angle of climb-out and its length of time, the most efficient altitude at which to boost to supersonic speed and how to handle emergency situations. Thomas E. Stimson, Popular Mechanics, "Remembering the B-70: The Weird Supersonic Bomber That Never Was," 11 Feb. 2021 The process of securing the $787 billion package — aid broadly credited for helping boost an economy in free fall — left a bad taste for the Obama-Biden White House. Alexandra Jaffe And Jonathan Lemire, Anchorage Daily News, "Biden’s dilemma in virus aid fight: Go big or go bipartisan," 7 Feb. 2021 Chamber officials said those people are a natural resource that can be tapped to boost the region's economy. John Wisely, Detroit Free Press, "Report: More metro Detroit high school grads are not college ready," 3 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The next MacBook Pro 16 will likely feature Apple’s most powerful version of its new silicon with a big boost in graphics performance, the latter sine qua non for Apple’s most Pro of Pro MacBooks. Brooke Crothers, Forbes, "16-Inch M1 MacBook Pro 2021: New Leaks Point To Major Makeover," 27 Feb. 2021 Those developments appear to have already translated into a boost in consumer spending. Josh Mitchell, WSJ, "Boost to Household Income Primes U.S. Economy for Stronger Growth," 26 Feb. 2021 Economists said federal relief efforts helped change the economic picture, along with a boost in consumer spending when people got stimulus checks, relaxation of some COVID restrictions and progress on vaccines. Star Tribune, "New Minnesota forecast: $1.6 billion projected surplus in next budget," 26 Feb. 2021 That is adding to the argument that the economy, despite positive trends, such as a boost in consumer spending in January, will need more stimulus to regain its footing in 2021. Aimee Picchi, CBS News, "Third stimulus check: Will you get a $1,400 check?," 25 Feb. 2021 Although the presentation received a boost in exposure when NBC acquired broadcast rights in the 1990s, articles about the group's journalistic credentials and cozy relationship with studios have seemingly surfaced every few years. Brian Lowry, CNN, "The Golden Globes are considered a big party. This year, they'll air under two clouds," 25 Feb. 2021 Such attention could bring a welcome boost in funding for medical schools and internship programs, perhaps helping remedy an impending physician shortage projected by the AAMC. Noah Robertson, The Christian Science Monitor, "Be like Fauci? Pandemic inspires surge in med school applications.," 24 Feb. 2021 Its big boost in profile came from a 1987 film adaptation, helmed by Muppet master Frank Oz and featuring big names like Rick Moranis, Steve Martin, and John Candy. Jason Bailey, Vulture, "A Brief History of the Alternate Movie Endings Lost to Time," 24 Feb. 2021 Powell downplayed concerns as to whether recent policy decisions and a post-pandemic boost in consumer spending could lead to higher inflation — an issue recently raised by former Obama-era National Economic Council director Larry Summers. NBC News, "Fed Chair Powell's congressional testimony: Stimulus, job losses and inflation," 23 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'boost.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of boost

Verb

1801, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1801, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for boost

Verb

of obscure origin

Noun

noun derivative of boost entry 1

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Statistics for boost

Last Updated

3 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Boost.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/boost. Accessed 8 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for boost

boost

verb

English Language Learners Definition of boost

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to increase the force, power, or amount of (something)
: to push or shove (something or someone) up from below

boost

noun

English Language Learners Definition of boost (Entry 2 of 2)

: an increase in amount
: help or encouragement
: a push upward

boost

verb
\ ˈbüst How to pronounce boost (audio) \
boosted; boosting

Kids Definition of boost

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to raise or push up from below He boosted me through the window.
2 : to make bigger or greater boost production

Other Words from boost

booster noun

boost

noun

Kids Definition of boost (Entry 2 of 2)

: a push up : an act of boosting Give me a boost over the fence.

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More from Merriam-Webster on boost

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for boost

Nglish: Translation of boost for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of boost for Arabic Speakers

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