induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Definition of induce

transitive verb

1a : to move by persuasion or influence
b : to call forth or bring about by influence or stimulation
2a : effect, cause
b : to cause the formation of
c : to produce by induction induce an electric current
3 : to determine by induction specifically : to infer from particulars

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Did You Know?

Inducing is usually gentle persuasion; you may, for instance, induce a friend to go to a concert, or induce a child to stop crying. An inducement is something that might lure you to do something, though inducements are occasionally a bit menacing, like the Godfather's offer that you can't refuse. Induce also sometimes means "produce;" thus, doctors must at times induce labor in a pregnant woman. Notice that induct and induction are somewhat different from induce and inducement, though they come from the identical roots.

Examples of induce in a Sentence

The advertisement is meant to induce people to eat more fruit. No one knows what induced him to leave. Her illness was induced by overwork. They will induce labor to avoid complications.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Under humid conditions, a person sweats more, meaning a fan can induce more evaporation and cooling. NBC News, "Electric fans aren't always best for cooling off. Here's why.," 5 Aug. 2019 This is termed a species mismatch, and is increasingly observed as a result of climate change induced phenological shifts, where predators and their prey are no longer in the same place at the same time. Jennifer Fitchett, Quartz Africa, "These scientists tracked South Africa’s sardine run over 66 years," 4 Aug. 2019 With Nick Castellanos coming to hit, with a 1.026 OPS against lefties, Brewers manager Craig Counsell summoned righty Matt Albers, who induced Castellanos to ground into a double play. Tom Haudricourt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Cubs 4, Brewers 1: Offense continues to be missing in action in third consecutive defeat," 3 Aug. 2019 Tampering, as defined by Article 35A, refers to any attempt to entice, induce or persuade a person who is under contract with another team to join the tampering team. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "How Michael Jordan Could Become Connected to Zion Williamson's Lawsuit," 2 Aug. 2019 Owens saw a pitcher with three types of fastball who can induce ground balls like clockwork. Shayna Rubin, The Mercury News, "New Athletics pitcher Tanner Roark slated for Sunday debut vs. Cardinals," 2 Aug. 2019 If Mr Vizcarra resigns, and induces Ms Aráoz to follow, the president of congress would be obliged to call general elections. The Economist, "Martín Vizcarra tries to end his presidency early," 1 Aug. 2019 In April, Zoo Miami welcomed the birth of the first rhino ever to be conceived from induced ovulation and artificial insemination. Fox News, "Rhino saved? Southern white rhino gives birth aided by artificial insemination," 1 Aug. 2019 This is modeled basically on the Obama administration’s Race to the Top program for K-12 education, which, while controversial on the merits, was unquestionably effective in inducing policy change. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "America’s dual housing crisis and what Democrats plan to do about it, explained," 30 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'induce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of induce

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for induce

Middle English, from Anglo-French inducer, from Latin inducere, from in- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Statistics for induce

Last Updated

9 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for induce

The first known use of induce was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for induce

induce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of induce

somewhat formal : to cause (someone or something) to do something
: to cause (something) to happen or exist
medical : to give (a pregnant woman) special medicine in order to make her give birth : to cause (labor or birth) to begin by giving special drugs to a pregnant woman

induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Kids Definition of induce

1 : to cause to do something Her pleas induced us to give.
2 : to bring about Warm milk induces sleepiness.
3 : to produce (as an electric current) by induction
in·​duce | \ in-ˈd(y)üs How to pronounce induce (audio) \
induced; inducing

Medical Definition of induce

1 : to cause or bring about anesthesia induced by drugs : as
a(1) : to cause the embryological formation of the optic cup induces lens tissue in the adjacent ectoderm
(2) : to cause to form through embryonic induction induce ectoderm to form a neural tube
b : to cause or initiate by artificial means induced abortion induced labor
2 : to produce anesthesia in the patient was induced by a mixture of thiopental and curare

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More from Merriam-Webster on induce

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with induce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for induce

Spanish Central: Translation of induce

Nglish: Translation of induce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of induce for Arabic Speakers

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