induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Definition of induce

transitive verb

1a : to move by persuasion or influence
b : to call forth or bring about by influence or stimulation
2a : effect, cause
b : to cause the formation of
c : to produce by induction induce an electric current
3 : to determine by induction specifically : to infer from particulars

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Did You Know?

Inducing is usually gentle persuasion; you may, for instance, induce a friend to go to a concert, or induce a child to stop crying. An inducement is something that might lure you to do something, though inducements are occasionally a bit menacing, like the Godfather's offer that you can't refuse. Induce also sometimes means "produce;" thus, doctors must at times induce labor in a pregnant woman. Notice that induct and induction are somewhat different from induce and inducement, though they come from the identical roots.

Examples of induce in a Sentence

The advertisement is meant to induce people to eat more fruit. No one knows what induced him to leave. Her illness was induced by overwork. They will induce labor to avoid complications.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Stephens was accused of agreeing to help bribe union officials to induce them to place union pension assets under his management. David Jesse, Detroit Free Press, "How a down-and-out broker got University of Michigan to invest $95M," 22 June 2018 In other words: in addition to the nostalgia factor, some brand-new, shock-inducing drama is not to be missed. Christian Allaire, Vogue, "9 New Things to Stream in May on Netflix, Amazon Prime, and More," 29 Apr. 2019 As awe-inducing as some of the most extravagant experiences are—a private tour of Coco Chanel’s apartment, attending the Royal Ascot with the royal family—smaller-scale efforts make up the DNA of the SaksFirst Limitless program. Diana Nguyen, Harper's BAZAAR, "The Woman Behind New York’s Most Glamorous Closets," 22 Mar. 2019 And then, find the perfect Instagram caption below to compliment your jealousy-inducing beach photo. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "37 Beach Instagram Captions That’ll Get All The Likes," 14 Dec. 2018 Riccardo has constructed nine modest guest cottages across the property that Elena rents out; the standout among them is the timber-and-iron Treehouse, a one-room studio on high stilts with sigh-inducing views of the Chianti hills. Maria Shollenbarger, ELLE Decor, "An Italian Design Firm Transforms Discreet-but-Luxe Kitchens with a Timeless Florentine Aesthetic," 18 Oct. 2018 Such satellites would likely be lost during the chaos-inducing inward migration undertaken by these giants after their formation, the thinking goes. Mike Wall, Space.com, "First Exomoon Found? Neptune-Sized World Possibly Spotted Orbiting Alien Planet," 3 Oct. 2018 For some, speaking in front of large groups of people is a sweat-inducing task. Jane Stueckemann, Houston Chronicle, "Cy-Fair group helps make public speaking a passion for its members," 10 July 2018 Now retired, Costello has filled her days with painting and in this case, with wow-inducing works depicting people and places in our area. Lisa Peklo, Howard County Times, "Artist captures local landmarks in paintings [West Friendship]," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'induce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of induce

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for induce

Middle English, from Anglo-French inducer, from Latin inducere, from in- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Statistics for induce

Last Updated

17 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for induce

The first known use of induce was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for induce

induce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of induce

somewhat formal : to cause (someone or something) to do something
: to cause (something) to happen or exist
medical : to give (a pregnant woman) special medicine in order to make her give birth : to cause (labor or birth) to begin by giving special drugs to a pregnant woman

induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Kids Definition of induce

1 : to cause to do something Her pleas induced us to give.
2 : to bring about Warm milk induces sleepiness.
3 : to produce (as an electric current) by induction
in·​duce | \ in-ˈd(y)üs How to pronounce induce (audio) \
induced; inducing

Medical Definition of induce

1 : to cause or bring about anesthesia induced by drugs : as
a(1) : to cause the embryological formation of the optic cup induces lens tissue in the adjacent ectoderm
(2) : to cause to form through embryonic induction induce ectoderm to form a neural tube
b : to cause or initiate by artificial means induced abortion induced labor
2 : to produce anesthesia in the patient was induced by a mixture of thiopental and curare

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More from Merriam-Webster on induce

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with induce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for induce

Spanish Central: Translation of induce

Nglish: Translation of induce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of induce for Arabic Speakers

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