more

adjective
\ ˈmȯr How to pronounce more (audio) \

Definition of more

 (Entry 1 of 7)

1 : greater something more than she expected
2 : additional, further more guests arrived

more

adverb

Definition of more (Entry 2 of 7)

1a : in addition a couple of times more
b : moreover
2 : to a greater or higher degree often used with an adjective or adverb to form the comparative more evenly matched

more

noun

Definition of more (Entry 3 of 7)

1 : a greater quantity, number, or amount liked the idea better the more I thought about it
2 : something additional : an additional amount
3 obsolete : persons of higher rank

Definition of more (Entry 4 of 7)

: additional persons or things or a greater amount more will arrive shortly more was spilled

More

biographical name (1)
\ ˈmȯr How to pronounce More (audio) \

Definition of More (Entry 5 of 7)

Hannah 1745–1833 English religious writer

More

biographical name (2)

Definition of More (Entry 6 of 7)

Henry 1614–1687 English philosopher

More

biographical name (3)

Definition of More (Entry 7 of 7)

Sir Thomas 1478–1535 Saint Thomas More English statesman and author

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Examples of more in a Sentence

Adjective

I felt more pain after the procedure, not less. The new engine has even more power. You like more sugar in your tea than I do. He had done more harm than he had intended. The series will have five more episodes. The company hired a few more employees. I offered him some more coffee. One more thing and then I'm leaving. Can you say that one more time?

Adverb

The shot hurt more than I expected. It happens more often than it used to. The building looks more like a museum than a library. The players grew more intense as the game went on. To me, there's nothing more exciting than playing football. She more closely resembles her aunt than her mother. He struggled to find a more comfortable position. It's the same product—they've done nothing more than change the label. a couple of times more What more could you ask for?

Noun

add a little more to the mixture
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Understanding exactly what to expect can help survivors feel more empowered to make the decision that is best for them. Hannah Brashers, Allure, "What to Expect When Reporting a Sexual Assault to Law Enforcement," 12 Apr. 2019 Down 2-1 in the series, Thunderbirds captain Nolan Volcan said his team needed more focus. Geoff Baker, The Seattle Times, "With NHL’s arrival looming, Seattle Thunderbirds, Everett Silvertips in local junior hockey golden era," 10 Apr. 2019 The top 14 list includes Laine Hardy, former 90 Day Fiancé star Evelyn Cormier, Alyssa Raghu, Dimitrius Graham, Riley Thompson, Alejandro Aranda, and more. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "'American Idol' Fans Attack Luke Bryan After Judges' “Huge Mistake” in Top 14 Episode," 9 Apr. 2019 Some more tips are to water wisely—every few days—and to keep your weeds under control, especially in the spring. Elizabeth Gulino, House Beautiful, "You’ll Never Guess The Number One Thing Buyers Look For When Purchasing a Home," 9 Apr. 2019 Think some of spring’s more fun trends—hair accessories, bucket hats, or a statement bag. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "Don’t Body Shame Yourself Out of Wearing Summer Clothes," 9 Apr. 2019 But women who took four or more years off work made 65 percent less than women who never took time out; men who took the same amount of time, meanwhile, made 57 percent less than men who worked straight through. Anna North, Vox, "You’ve heard that women make 80 cents to men’s dollar. It’s much worse than that.," 2 Apr. 2019 There’s so much more to preparing your home for a new baby than picking a color palette and painting the nursery. Jennifer Fernandez, House Beautiful, "6 Nursery-Decorating Mistakes To Avoid For Your Baby’s Health," 19 Dec. 2018 What’s more, celebrities are humans with emotions and struggles — and they can be affected by hate, just like the rest of us. De Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Pete Davidson's Instagram Post About Mental Health Is a Reminder Not to Harass Celebs Online," 17 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb

The condition is more often than not reflected in the price. Eric Whitmer, House Beautiful, "What You Should Know Before Buying A Mid-Century Modern Home," 5 Apr. 2019 And in Canada, men continue to reach management positions more often and much earlier. Jenna Birch, Harper's BAZAAR, "The Secret Code to Success Most Women Don't Even Know Exists," 3 Apr. 2019 Plus, given Grey's 14-year run, she's worked up more than her fair of share of experience. Blair Donovan, Country Living, "Who Will Replace Lori Loughlin on 'When Calls the Heart?' Here Are 6 Popular Theories," 31 Mar. 2019 Only Paris Saint-Germain, which claimed the trophy over the past five years, has won it more often, with eight titles. Samuel Petrequin, The Seattle Times, "Strasbourg wins French League Cup after penalty shootout," 30 Mar. 2019 But since giving birth to her baby girl Kaavia James last November, Union has definitely been embracing the minimal makeup life more often. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, "Gabrielle Union Just Posted a Makeup-Free Selfie on the Set of “America’s Got Talent”," 20 Mar. 2019 Citi’s advertising in the last five years featured male musical artists more often than women, Ms. Breithaupt said. Nat Ives, WSJ, "Citi and Advertiser Group Start a Push to Lift Female Musicians," 8 Mar. 2019 The reason is simple: crimes tend to happen much more often in darkness. Dan Nosowitz, Popular Mechanics, "Daylight Savings Time Is Actually a Good Thing," 4 Mar. 2019 Narrow by price, style (Mid-Century Modern, Hollywood Regency, Art Deco, and more) and even search for items that are available for local pickup near you. Brittney Morgan, House Beautiful, "Here's Where to Buy Vintage Furniture Online, No Matter What Your Style Is," 29 Mar. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But Bathylle Missika, head of the OECD development center’s gender division, said that social mores are slower and harder to change than laws. Paul Hannon, WSJ, "U.S. Women Face Continued Discrimination Challenges," 7 Dec. 2018 And indeed past translators (Joseph Hall in 1608, for instance) have used it as a jumping-off point to satirize contemporary mores. A.e. Stallings, WSJ, "‘Characters’ Review: You Know the Types," 7 Dec. 2018 Desdemona’s and Emilia’s discussion toward the end about the foibles of men has seldom felt wittier or more on point. Ben Brantley, New York Times, "Review: A Cool-Tempered ‘Othello’ for Warm Central Park Nights," 18 June 2018 Cultural mores change gradually, but there are still flash points along the way. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "The True Story of Gary Hart's Presidential Campaign Scandal in The Front Runner," 8 Nov. 2018 At that time, the prestige of Catholicism in Ireland was virtually unquestioned, and the nation’s public mores were in line with the teachings of the church. Francis X. Rocca, WSJ, "Sex Abuse to Cast Shadow Over Pope’s Ireland Visit," 23 Aug. 2018 The opportunity for being a guide and a source of analysis and intelligence at a time when the industry is being disrupted, not just by technology but by globalization and changing social mores. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Colin Kaepernick’s Nike ads are just one piece of a bigger ‘reckoning’ in the fashion industry," 20 Sep. 2018 The Scientific Temperance Federation eventually faded away, no match for changing mores. Stephanie Schorow, BostonGlobe.com, "What should marijuana opponents do when their cause fails? A lesson from Prohibition," 23 June 2018 Others, like Huck Finn's dubious riverboat dauphin, count on the people around them to be ignorant of aristocratic mores and genealogical charts and awed by the idea of nobility. Sadie Stein, Town & Country, "Why Are Rich People So Easily Fooled?," 26 Feb. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'more.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of more

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for more

Adjective, Adverb, Noun, and Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

Middle English, from Old English māra; akin to Old English , adverb, more, Old High German mēr, Old Irish more

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Learn More about more

Statistics for more

Last Updated

15 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for more

The first known use of more was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for more

more

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of more

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: greater in amount, number, or size
: extra or additional

more

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of more (Entry 2 of 3)

: to a greater degree or extent
: more often or for a longer period of time
: in addition

more

pronoun

English Language Learners Definition of more (Entry 3 of 3)

: a greater number or amount

more

adjective
\ ˈmȯr How to pronounce more (audio) \

Kids Definition of more

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : greater in amount, number, or size You like more sugar in your tea than I do.
2 : extra entry 1, additional I need more time.

more

adverb

Kids Definition of more (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : in addition Wait one day more.
2 : to a greater extent
Hint: More is often used with an adjective or adverb to form the comparative.
more active more actively

more

noun

Kids Definition of more (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a greater amount or number I got more than I expected.
2 : an additional amount He was too full to eat any more.

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More from Merriam-Webster on more

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with more

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for more

Spanish Central: Translation of more

Nglish: Translation of more for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of more for Arabic Speakers

Comments on more

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