corps

noun
\ ˈkȯr How to pronounce corps (audio) \
plural corps\ ˈkȯrz How to pronounce corps (audio) \

Definition of corps

1a : an organized subdivision of the military establishment Marine Corps Signal Corps
b : a tactical unit usually consisting of two or more divisions and auxiliary arms and services
2 : a group of persons associated together or acting under common direction especially : a body of persons having a common activity or occupation the press corps

Keep scrolling for more

corps or core (or corp or corpse)?

Corps and core are homophones with completely distinct meanings. Whereas corps usually refers to a group of people, core, a word of uncertain origin, carries the senses “the central or most important part of something” or “the usually inedible central part of some fruits.” Corp and corpse share an etymology with corps; all three words come from the Latin corpus, meaning “body.” However, corp is an abbreviation for “corporation” and corpse is most often used to mean “a dead body, especially of a human being.” (Before the eighteenth century, corpse could and often did also refer to a living body.)

Examples of corps in a Sentence

members of the press corps a reporter who is widely respected throughout the press corps
Recent Examples on the Web He was awarded the contract in August and immediately got to work with a corps of assistants, charting the boundaries, soil and geographical features of the park. Gary Kamiya, SFChronicle.com, "How Golden Gate Park ended up in the Outside Lands," 4 Sep. 2020 Expect big production from the linebacking corps (Chase O’neil, Derrick Hollenkamp and Zane Wilkerson) and Lance Weiter (team-high four interceptions) to lead the secondary. Dominique Yates, The Courier-Journal, "What to know about the 2020 football teams at DeSales and Christian Academy," 2 Sep. 2020 No, this wasn’t a prediction about 2020 specifically, but a high-concept novella in which a corps of volunteers donates sleep to those who need it. Trevor Fraser, orlandosentinel.com, "10 short books to read on National Read a Book Day," 2 Sep. 2020 Their catching corps, led by Austin Hedges, was hitting .146 with a .228 on-base percentage and .291 slugging percentage. Bob Nightengale, USA TODAY, "'We're the most exciting team in baseball': With Mike Clevinger trade on deadline day, Padres ready for a run," 31 Aug. 2020 While Dawson has a large corps of defensive returnees to compete in District 23-6A, Friendswood returns a strong front seven on defense and a host of skill veterans on offense. Ted Dunnam, Houston Chronicle, "Football: Friendswood, Dawson gearing up for initial practices," 31 Aug. 2020 In recent weeks, city health officials were able to ditch the phone tree in favor of a new computer system created by a corps of programmers from the volunteer group Code for Baltimore. Meredith Cohn, baltimoresun.com, "New technology keeps Baltimore in touch with seniors through hurricanes, pandemics," 27 Aug. 2020 America already faced a vanishing corps of volunteers before the virus, as existing ones retired or died. John Fund, National Review, "Another Potential Election Fiasco: Vanishing Volunteers at the Polls," 23 Aug. 2020 By the 12th century, the practice began of establishing corps of priests who lived at the cathedral and spent their days teaching. Andrew Barnes, The Conversation, "Schools looking for space could turn to churches to host classes – doing so has a rich history," 20 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'corps.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of corps

1707, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for corps

borrowed from French, "body, tactical military unit, group of persons or things," going back to Old French cors "body, group of persons or things," going back to Latin corpus — more at midriff

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about corps

Time Traveler for corps

Time Traveler

The first known use of corps was in 1707

See more words from the same year

Statistics for corps

Last Updated

15 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Corps.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/corps. Accessed 21 Sep. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for corps

corps

noun
How to pronounce corps (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of corps

: an organized part of the military
: a large military group consisting of two or more divisions
: a group of people who are involved in some activity

corps

noun
\ ˈkȯr How to pronounce corps (audio) \
plural corps\ ˈkȯrz \

Kids Definition of corps

1 : an organized branch of a country's military forces Marine Corps
2 : a group of persons acting under one authority diplomatic corps

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on corps

What made you want to look up corps? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Homophone Quiz

  • three bears two of them look like theyre whispering to a third bear who looks chuffed to be the center of attention
  • In order to judge how people felt, the senator's office hired a firm to take a ______.
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Citation

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!