lump

1 of 4

noun

1
: a piece or mass of indefinite size and shape
a lump of coal
a lump of clay
2
a
: aggregate, totality
taken in the lump
b
: majority
few candidates ever started with such a lump who did not get the nominationR. L. Strout
3
: protuberance
especially : an abnormal swelling
came to with nothing more than a lump on his head
4
: a person who is heavy and awkward
a lump of a man
also : one who is stupid or dull
5
lumps plural
a
: beatings, bruises
had taken a lot of lumps growing up in the city
b
: defeat, loss
can cheerfully take his lumps on losers, because the payout is big on the winnersMartin Mayer

lump

2 of 4

verb (1)

lumped; lumping; lumps

transitive verb

1
: to group indiscriminately
2
: to make into lumps
also : to make lumps on or in
3
: to move noisily and clumsily

intransitive verb

1
: to become formed into lumps
2
: to move oneself noisily and clumsily

lump

3 of 4

adjective

: not divided into parts : entire
a lump sum

lump

4 of 4

verb (2)

lumped; lumping; lumps

transitive verb

: to put up with
like it or lump it
Phrases
lump in one's throat
: a constriction of the throat caused by emotion

Examples of lump in a Sentence

Noun turning a lump of clay into a beautiful pot He got a lump on his head after bumping into the doorway.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
All poetry begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, or a lovesickness. Richard Lederer, San Diego Union-Tribune, 16 Mar. 2024 Crab and Fontina Cheese Frittata, an egg souffle topped with creamy Fontina cheese and lump crab meat. Heidi Finley, Charlotte Observer, 27 Mar. 2024 When she finally got checked out ‒ when the pain finally drove her to stop putting it off ‒ there were three cancerous lumps in her breast. Karen Weintraub, USA TODAY, 17 Mar. 2024 All the unspent love gathers up in the corners of your eyes, the lump in your throat, and in that hallow of your chest. Kelly Wynne, Peoplemag, 11 Mar. 2024 Crawford’s ever-positive attitude was almost as large a part of his scouting report as his abilities with a bat and ball, and he’s taken his lumps in stride. Evan Webeck, The Mercury News, 15 Feb. 2024 This three-pound lump of gray matter in our skulls processes our thoughts, memories, feelings, and unconscious physiology. Andrew Mawson, Forbes, 29 Feb. 2024 Confident her lump was benign, the University of Southern California student enrolled in a three-week work stay program on regenerative agriculture in San Francisco. Zoey Lyttle, Peoplemag, 28 Feb. 2024 Sifting will help remove any lumps from the flour and aerate the mixture, which will help make your cake light and fluffy. Andrea Beck, Better Homes & Gardens, 27 Feb. 2024
Verb
While the men’s tournament is divided into four regional locations, the women’s teams are lumped into two on opposite sides of the country. Anne M. Peterson and Doug Feinberg, The Christian Science Monitor, 5 Apr. 2024 Once considered different species, numerous varieties of juncos have been lumped together over the years. Cecilia Garzella, USA TODAY, 29 Mar. 2024 There are also food intolerances, which aren’t actually allergies but colloquially get lumped into this category. Katia Hetter, CNN, 27 Mar. 2024 For efficiency, Austin wants to lump in part of Barrington, which is just south of Norwood, into the funds. Karl Schneider, The Indianapolis Star, 20 Mar. 2024 Some of the experts tend to lump species together, while others split them. Carl Zimmer, New York Times, 19 Feb. 2024 Rather than lump overseas areas together into a grand, U.S.-led battle space, Washington should differentiate among regions and establish clear divisions of labor between itself and its security partners. Stephen Wertheim, Foreign Affairs, 14 Feb. 2024 Why is colorectal cancer increasing among young people? Colon and rectal cancers share many similarities and are typically lumped into one category, called colorectal cancer. Knvul Sheikh, New York Times, 27 Mar. 2024 His sense of humor lumps him in with a broader movement of Michigan rappers who specialize in side-splitting bars. Andre Gee, Rolling Stone, 21 Mar. 2024
Adjective
The Malaysian government has offered monthly assistance to the unemployed and lump payments to workers in certain sectors. Matt Apuzzo, New York Times, 23 Mar. 2020 The menu includes grilled salmon salad on a corn tostada, red fish with tomato artichoke beurre blanc sauce, enchiladas with lump crab meat, chocolate strawberries and churros. Audrey Eads, Dallas News, 7 Feb. 2020 This means making sure you get paid for all your unused vacation time or PTO, and, if applicable, understanding the options for your company stock and pension (for example, single life, lump sum, or joint with survivor). Nathan Bachrach and Amy Wagner, Cincinnati.com, 4 Feb. 2020 States under the total lump sum block-grant model would be required to keep health service spending at a level of at least 80% of the target. Stephanie Armour, WSJ, 30 Jan. 2020 Under the wages provision in the new contract, a firefighter who has been on the force for five years, earning $57,900, would get a 5 percent lump sum payment of $2,895. Joshua Fechter, ExpressNews.com, 24 Jan. 2020 If that funding is converted to a block grant, a state could get a limited, lump sum of federal money instead. Stephanie Armour, WSJ, 19 Jan. 2020 Members will also receive raises equal to 6% of wages over the life of the contract, and two lump sum payments equal to 4% of annual wages. Chris Isidore, CNN, 11 Dec. 2019 In the deal, workers would receive $9,000 before taxes, plus lump sum payments for skilled-trades workers of $1,000 this year and in 2021. Grace Schneider, The Courier-Journal, 16 Nov. 2019

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'lump.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun, Verb (1), and Adjective

Middle English

Verb (2)

origin unknown

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

1624, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Adjective

circa 1700, in the meaning defined above

Verb (2)

1791, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of lump was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near lump

Cite this Entry

“Lump.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lump. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

lump

1 of 3 noun
1
: a small uneven mass
2
: a collection or sum of units or parts : total
taken in the lump
3
: an abnormal swelling or growth

lump

2 of 3 adjective
: not divided into parts : whole
a lump sum

lump

3 of 3 verb
1
: to group together
2
: to move noisily and clumsily
3
: to form into a lump

Medical Definition

lump

noun
1
: a piece or mass of indefinite size and shape
2
: an abnormal mass or swelling
presenting as a neck lump

More from Merriam-Webster on lump

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