slump

verb
\ ˈsləmp How to pronounce slump (audio) \
slumped; slumping; slumps

Definition of slump

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to fall or sink suddenly
b : to drop or slide down suddenly : collapse
2 : to assume a drooping posture or carriage : slouch
3 : to go into a slump sales slumped

slump

noun

Definition of slump (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a marked or sustained decline especially in economic activity or prices
b : a period of poor or losing play by a team or individual
2 : a downward slide of a mass of rock or land

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Synonyms & Antonyms for slump

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Noun

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Examples of slump in a Sentence

Verb She fainted and slumped to the floor. Exhausted, he slumped down into the chair. His shoulders slumped forward in disappointment. Real estate prices slumped during the recession. Noun The economy's been in a slump since last year. They've been in a slump ever since they traded their best player. He's in a batting slump.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Last month, for example, exports dropped as the coronavirus continued hurting the country's major trading partners, causing demand to slump. Laura He, CNN, "China is promising to write off some loans to Africa. It may just be a drop in the ocean," 19 June 2020 Strategists led by David Kostin have rolled back their prediction that the S&P 500 would slump to the 2,400 level -- over 20% below Friday’s 3,044 close -- and now see downside risks capped at 2,750. Joanna Ossinger, Fortune, "Even Goldman bears are rethinking their stock picks after the May rally," 1 June 2020 Commercial- and residential-property markets could slump as jobs move out of cities, even if only for part of the week. The Economist, "Urban living Great cities after the pandemic," 11 June 2020 If that were to happen, according to Moody's Analytics, the current economic rebound would quickly end and the economy would slump back into recession in the second half of the year. James Pethokoukis, TheWeek, "Maybe the stock market isn't crazy," 10 June 2020 Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson recently warned that Sweden is facing its worst economic crisis since World War II, with GDP set to slump 7% in 2020, roughly as much as the rest of the EU. Rafaela Lindeberg, Fortune, "Sweden chose a looser lockdown. The scientist behind the strategy now says the death toll is too high," 3 June 2020 Arguments that the largest digital token acts as a place of shelter during market turmoil diminished this week as Bitcoin slumped amid an intense bout of equity-market selling. Vildana Hajric, Bloomberg.com, "Bitcoin Is ‘in Trouble’ After Breaking Below Key $9,000 Level," 12 May 2020 The electronics and engineering giant Siemens, a bellwether for the German economy, reported that first-quarter profit fell by more than half as new orders slumped. New York Times, "U.S. Jobs Report Shows Clearest Data Yet on Economic Toll," 8 May 2020 The program helped usher in surging inflation and rampant unemployment, and the destruction of commercial farming slashed exports of crops such as tobacco, and triggered a series of famines as corn output slumped. Washington Post, "U.S. import prices declined in February as petroleum product costs fell," 13 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Like a batter going through a slump, Freedom Watch went 0 for 3. Jack Greiner, The Enquirer, "Strictly Legal: Freedom watch suit against social media platforms tossed. Again.," 30 June 2020 As oil, copper and other commodities rebound from their coronavirus slump, a metal that powers electric vehicles has been left in the dust. Joe Wallace, WSJ, "Battery Metal Lithium Left Behind as Commodities Rebound," 29 June 2020 Dustin Johnson broke out of a slump – for him anyway – to shoot 3-under 67 on Sunday and win the Travelers Championship by two strokes over Kevin Streelman. Adam Schupak, The Arizona Republic, "Dustin Johnson rallies for 21st PGA Tour win at Travelers Championship," 29 June 2020 Only grocery stores and online retailers have dodged the slump in UK retail sales over the past few months, with the pandemic accelerating a move to e-commerce that was already hurting physical stores. Hanna Ziady, CNN, "UK mall operator Intu collapses into insolvency. Thousands of jobs are at risk," 26 June 2020 One outcome of this is that the Indian government is piling up debt to make up for the revenue shortfall and fight the economic slump. Prathamesh Mulye, Quartz India, "Why India must borrow and spend wisely to counteract its Covid-19 slump," 25 June 2020 There is something disconcerting about an equity market trading just 10% below its all-time high amid a still-uncontained pandemic and the deepest economic slump since the 1930s. Tom Saler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Tom Saler: COVID-19 recession exposed cracks in the nation’s economic foundation that were long ignored," 20 June 2020 The Grand Hyatt San Antonio, which towers over the mostly empty Convention Center, has laid off 271 workers — more casualties of the deepest slump in the history of the city’s visitors industry. Madison Iszler, ExpressNews.com, "Grand Hyatt San Antonio laid off 271 workers," 19 June 2020 Workers in the Gulf, a major destination for migrant labour, have been hit by the slump in the oil industry; and the terms of their visas often prevent them from finding a new job. The Economist, "Trickles of gold Covid-19 has squeezed migrants’ remittances to their families," 15 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slump.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of slump

Verb

circa 1677, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1887, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for slump

Verb

probably imitative

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Time Traveler for slump

Time Traveler

The first known use of slump was circa 1677

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Statistics for slump

Last Updated

1 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Slump.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slump. Accessed 8 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for slump

slump

verb
How to pronounce slump (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of slump

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to sit or fall down suddenly and heavily
: to move down or forward suddenly
: to decrease suddenly and by a large amount

slump

noun

English Language Learners Definition of slump (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sudden decrease in prices, value, amount, etc.
: a period of time when an economy is doing poorly
US, sports : a period of time when a team or player is doing poorly

slump

verb
\ ˈsləmp How to pronounce slump (audio) \
slumped; slumping

Kids Definition of slump

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to drop or slide down suddenly : collapse The tired woman slumped into a chair.
2 : slouch entry 2 Don't slump when you walk.
3 : to drop sharply Sales slumped.

slump

noun

Kids Definition of slump (Entry 2 of 2)

: a big or continued drop especially in prices, business, or performance

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More from Merriam-Webster on slump

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for slump

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with slump

Spanish Central: Translation of slump

Nglish: Translation of slump for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of slump for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about slump

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