slouch

noun
\ ˈslau̇ch How to pronounce slouch (audio) \

Definition of slouch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : an awkward fellow : lout
b : one that is unimpressive especially : a lazy or incompetent person used in negative constructions was no slouch at cooking
2 : a gait or posture characterized by an ungainly stooping of the head and shoulders or excessive relaxation of body muscles

slouch

verb
slouched; slouching; slouches

Definition of slouch (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to walk, stand, or sit with a slouch : assume a slouch
2 : droop
3 : to go or move slowly or reluctantly

transitive verb

: to cause to droop slouched his shoulders

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Other Words from slouch

Verb

sloucher noun

Examples of slouch in a Sentence

Noun

She walks with a slouch. is no slouch when it comes to cooking

Verb

Sit up straight. Please don't slouch. She slouched into the room. The boy was slouching over his school books.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Barrett was no slouch himself with the Blue Devils. Michael Shapiro, SI.com, "RJ Barrett Asks Zion Williamson About LeBron James Comparison," 19 June 2019 Even seven through nine, there are definitely no slouches. John Shipley, Twin Cities, "Max Kepler is hero as Twins knock off Boston, 4-3, in 17 innings," 19 June 2019 Intelligent life isn’t limited to land: The octopus brain is one of the most remarkable on Earth, and its cousin the cuttlefish is no slouch, either. John Wenz, Discover Magazine, "The Secret Origins of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence," 11 Feb. 2019 The subjects jump rope, slouch in chairs, sway on a stylish dance floor. Kathy Berdan, Twin Cities, "The art of community: Melvin and Rose Smith celebrate Rondo in Weisman exhibit," 7 June 2019 The Maserati Levante is no slouch, and even something like the Infiniti QX50 has a quick burst off the line. Eric Bangeman, Ars Technica, "Nine things I learned from driving a supercar for three days," 9 Nov. 2018 The strap is strong, and the body is expandable, curvy, and carefree, sometimes complete with a bit of slouch. Alexandra Gurvitch, Vogue, "Why the Hobo Bag Should Make a Comeback in 2019," 24 Dec. 2018 Small details now become clues to subjects’ personalities: a casual slouch or confident tilt of the head, a hand on the hip, a smile. Allie Spensley, WSJ, "‘African American Portraits: Photographs From the 1940s and 1950s’ Review: Depictions Free From Bias," 21 July 2018 At 5-foot-9 my head was against the roof even in a slouch. Robert Duffer, chicagotribune.com, "Review: 2017 Acura MDX Sport Hybrid is a smooth three-row marvel," 12 June 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Emilia nodded back at him and lightened the mood by goofily slouching in her chair. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Kit Harington and Emilia Clarke's Reactions to Daenerys's Death Are Too Much," 27 May 2019 Addressing reporters before the one-on-one meeting, Putin struck a casual pose during Trump’s remarks, slouching in his chair with his legs wide and eyes low. Vladimir Isachenkov, The Seattle Times, "Trump questions US intel, not Putin, on Russia 2016 meddling," 16 July 2018 As the recovery slouched into the early part of this decade, a handful of top-ranking executives huddled here and there, always discreetly, to discuss their most obvious problem. Thomas Gryta And Ted Mann, WSJ, "GE Powered the American Century—Then It Burned Out," 14 Dec. 2018 Seated in Helsinki's ornate Gothic Hall, Putin appeared to slouch in his chair and looked off to the side at times on Monday, avoiding eye contact with Trump at the start of their high-profile talks. Ken Thomas And Jonathan Lemire, Fox News, "The wink, the slouch -- the non-verbal cues at the summit," 16 July 2018 Seated in Helsinki’s ornate Gothic Hall, Putin appeared to slouch in his chair and looked off to the side at times on Monday, avoiding eye contact with Trump at the start of their high-profile talks. Jonathan Lemire, The Seattle Times, "The wink, the slouch — the non-verbal cues at the summit," 16 July 2018 This has been true at least since the ’60s, when album covers taught Baby Boomers how to dress, how to wear their hair, even how to slouch. David Kirby, WSJ, "What to Give: Books on Music," 15 Nov. 2018 Impressive communal areas, with plenty of space to hang out, work on a laptop, grab a latte, or just slouch on a sofa, are increasingly important for this reason—and also the Generator's bottom line, CEO Alastair Thomann explains. Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Hostels Became Poshtels: The Remaking of a Backpacker's Hangout," 12 Sep. 2018 Slumping or slouching regularly—or engaging in other forms of bad posture—can lead to a slew of issues over time. Korin Miller, SELF, "Here’s How to Actually Have Good Posture (and Why You Should Care)," 11 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'slouch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of slouch

Noun

1515, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1754, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for slouch

Noun

origin unknown

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Statistics for slouch

Last Updated

25 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for slouch

The first known use of slouch was in 1515

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More Definitions for slouch

slouch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of slouch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a way of walking, sitting, or standing with the head and shoulders bent forward
informal : a lazy or worthless person

slouch

verb

English Language Learners Definition of slouch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to walk, sit, or stand lazily with your head and shoulders bent forward

slouch

noun
\ ˈslau̇ch How to pronounce slouch (audio) \

Kids Definition of slouch

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a lazy worthless person He's no slouch as a worker.
2 : a way of standing, sitting, or walking with the head and shoulders bent forward

slouch

verb
slouched; slouching

Kids Definition of slouch (Entry 2 of 2)

: to walk, stand, or sit lazily with the head and shoulders bent forward But their laughter slowly turned to silence till finally Peter slouched into a chair.— Chris Van Allsburg, Jumanji

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More from Merriam-Webster on slouch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with slouch

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for slouch

Spanish Central: Translation of slouch

Nglish: Translation of slouch for Spanish Speakers

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