age

noun
\ ˈāj How to pronounce age (audio) \

Definition of age

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the time of life at which some particular qualification, power, or capacity arises or rests the voting age is 18 specifically : majority
b : one of the stages of life
c : the length of an existence extending from the beginning to any given time a boy 10 years of age
e : an advanced stage of life
2 : a period of time dominated by a central figure or prominent feature the age of Pericles : such as
a : a period in history or human progress the age of reptiles the age of exploration
b : a cultural period marked by the prominence of a particular item entering the atomic age
c : a division of geologic time that is usually shorter than an epoch
3a : the period contemporary with a person's lifetime or with his or her active life
b : a long time usually used in pluralhaven't seen him in ages
4 : an individual's development measured in terms of the years requisite for like development of an average individual

age

verb
aged; aging or ageing

Definition of age (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

1 : to become old : show the effects or the characteristics of increasing age
2 : to acquire a desirable quality (such as mellowness or ripeness) by standing undisturbed for some time letting cheese age

transitive verb

1 : to cause to become old
2 : to bring to a state fit for use or to maturity

Definition of -age (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : aggregate : collection trackage
2a : action : process haulage
b : cumulative result of breakage
c : rate of dosage
3 : house or place of orphanage
4 : state : rank peonage
5 : charge postage

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Synonyms for age

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for age

Noun

period, epoch, era, age mean a division of time. period may designate an extent of time of any length. periods of economic prosperity epoch applies to a period begun or set off by some significant or striking quality, change, or series of events. the steam engine marked a new epoch in industry era suggests a period of history marked by a new or distinct order of things. the era of global communications age is used frequently of a fairly definite period dominated by a prominent figure or feature. the age of Samuel Johnson

Examples of age in a Sentence

Noun Some people are reluctant to reveal their ages. She died tragically at a young age. The treatment depends on the sex and age of the patient. She died at the ripe old age of 90. The movie appeals to people of all ages. Their son needs to spend more time with children his own age. a group of children ranging in age from 8 to 11 She became involved with a man twice her age. The program is for people over age 50. groups of people classified by race and age Verb As he aged he grew more and more bitter. You haven't aged a day since I saw you last! His troubles have aged him. Exposure to the sun has aged her skin. The wine ages in oak barrels. The wine is aged in oak barrels.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun By 2018, about 25 million young adults in that age range were living at home, per a Pew analysis of data from the Census Bureau. Joe Pinsker, The Atlantic, "The Pandemic’s Boomerang Generation Has Settled In," 3 July 2020 And in an age of such national discomfort, comfort zones can be hard to find. Jeff Mcdonald, ExpressNews.com, "For San Antonio Spurs, chance to resume no slam dunk," 3 July 2020 In this age of texts, direct messages, and emails, getting a 41-year-old man excited about the mail is no small feat. USA Today, "Through the mail, a visit from Grandma," 2 July 2020 Universities in an age of austerity do not support or reward scholarly inquiry as a self-justifying vocation. George Blaustein, The New Republic, "Searching for Consolation in Max Weber’s Work Ethic," 2 July 2020 Through the month of June, the number of COVID-19 cases among Oregon children younger than 10 grew fivefold -- the fastest growth rate of new or presumed infections across any age range. oregonlive, "Gov. Kate Brown holds press conference to discuss Oregon mask requirements, coronavirus increases: Watch Live," 1 July 2020 The fight against hate speech overlaps with a longtime business concern of marketers in the digital age: keeping their ads far from offensive content. Sahil Patel, WSJ, "Facebook’s Tensions With Advertisers Predate the Boycott," 30 June 2020 From 2014 to 2016, less than 1% of students in that age range were suspended districtwide each school year. Kristin Finan And Sarah Asch, USA TODAY, "Austin schools suspend Black students nearly 5 times as often as white students," 30 June 2020 That age range accounted for 56 percent of the state’s new coronavirus infections over a two-week period ending June 28, compared to just 27 percent for the two-week period ending April 5. Evan Macdonald, cleveland, "Ohio’s coronavirus mortality rate declines as young people account for higher percentage of cases, MetroHealth says," 30 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb And that's because the scientists behind a new study say dogs and humans don't age at the same rate. Francesca Giuliani-hoffman, CNN, "Nope, every dog year isn't equal to 7 human years, researchers now say," 3 July 2020 Although, getting picky, none seemed likely to age as gracefully as their predecessors. Mike Duff, Car and Driver, "Aston Smarting: Could Anything Have Changed Andy Palmer's Aston Martin Tenure?," 2 July 2020 Rice has made these boys and others who age out of the program a priority by working with another company to produce a life scholarship. Sierra Newton, Cincinnati.com, "Angels Among Us: Rev. John Rice leads efforts to revitalize One Way Farm children's home," 19 June 2020 Cachay is concerned for his patients because HIV causes many to age prematurely. Usha Lee Mcfarling, STAT, "‘Flying blind’: Doctors race to understand what Covid-19 means for people with HIV," 10 June 2020 The new palmate leaves on ‘Orido Nishiki’ (12 to 18 feet) emerge a vibrant pink and then age to cream and green. Earl Nickel, SFChronicle.com, "The best Japanese maple for your Bay Area garden," 5 June 2020 While many might argue about the quality of SNL over the years, one thing’s for certain: like most television shows of the early 2000s, the NBC sketch series didn’t exactly age very well. Ineye Komonibo, refinery29.com, "Why Is Everyone Mad At Jimmy Fallon?," 26 May 2020 And, of course, the usual concerns about a game that is too deliberate and too slow to grow a base beyond its aging core. Gabe Lacques, USA TODAY, "Labor fights, new competition, invisible players: Why MLB may be sports' biggest loser during COVID-19 pandemic," 5 June 2020 Nearly 95,000 girls in the country aged nine to 18 are thought to stay home from school during their periods due to not being able to afford pads and tampons, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said in a statement. Helen Regan, CNN, "New Zealand to provide free sanitary products in schools to fight period poverty," 4 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'age.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of age

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for age

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French aage, age (earlier Old French edage, eage), from eé, aé "age, lifetime" (going back to Latin aetāt-, aetās, contraction of earlier aevitās, from aevum "time, lifetime" + -itāt-, -itās -ity) + -age -age — more at aye entry 3

Verb

Middle English agen, derivative of age age entry 1

Noun suffix

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French, going back to Latin -āticum (as in viāticum "provision for a journey"), neuter of -āticus, adjective suffix of appurtenance, from -a- (probably generalized from verbal derivatives, as vēnāticus "used for hunting," from vēnārī "to hunt") + -ticus, borrowed from Greek -tikos, generalized from derivatives of agent nouns (as athlētikós athletic) from athlḗtēs athlete

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Time Traveler for age

Time Traveler

The first known use of age was in the 13th century

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Statistics for age

Last Updated

7 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Age.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/age. Accessed 11 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for age

age

noun
How to pronounce -age (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of age

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: the amount of time during which a person or animal has lived
: the amount of time during which a thing has existed
: the time of life when a person does something or becomes legally able to do something

age

verb

English Language Learners Definition of age (Entry 2 of 3)

: to become old or older
: to cause (someone or something) to become old or to appear to be old
of food or drink : to be stored for a period of time in order to gain desired qualities

English Language Learners Definition of -age (Entry 3 of 3)

: action, process, or result of
: total amount or collection
: house or place of

age

noun
\ ˈāj How to pronounce age (audio) \

Kids Definition of age

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : the amount of time during which someone or something has lived or existed The child was six years of age.
2 : the time of life when a person receives some right or capacity The voting age is 18.
3 : the later part of life His mind was active in age as in youth.
4 : the condition of being old The building is showing signs of age.
5 : a period of time associated with a person or thing the age of dinosaurs
6 : a long period of time It's been ages since we last saw you.

age

verb
aged\ ˈājd \; aging or ageing

Kids Definition of age (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : to become old or older As he aged, he grew more forgetful.
2 : to cause to become old or to appear to be old Her troubles have aged her.
3 : to remain or cause to remain undisturbed until fit for use : mature The cheese must age.
\ ij \

Kids Definition of -age

1 : total amount : collection mileage
2 : action : process coverage
3 : result of coinage
4 : rate of shrinkage
5 : house or place of orphanage
6 : state : condition blockage
7 : fee : charge postage

age

noun
\ ˈāj How to pronounce age (audio) \

Medical Definition of age

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the part of life from birth to a given time a child 10 years of age
b : the time or part of life at which some particular event, qualification, or capacity arises, occurs, or is lost of reproductive age age of onset — see middle age
c : an advanced stage of life
2 : an individual's development measured in terms of the years requisite for like development of an average individual a child of 7 with a mental age of 10 — see binet age, mental age

age

verb
aged; aging or ageing

Medical Definition of age (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to become old : show the effects or the characteristics of increasing age

transitive verb

: to cause to become old

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age

noun

Legal Definition of age

: the time of life at which some particular qualification, power, or capacity arises the voting age is 18 — see also legal age, majority

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More from Merriam-Webster on age

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for age

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with age

Spanish Central: Translation of age

Nglish: Translation of age for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of age for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about age

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