mature

adjective
ma·​ture | \ mə-ˈchu̇r How to pronounce mature (audio) , -ˈchər also -ˈtu̇r How to pronounce mature (audio) , -ˈtyu̇r \
maturer; maturest

Definition of mature

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : based on slow careful consideration a mature judgment
2a(1) : having completed natural growth and development : ripe mature fruit
(2) : having undergone maturation
b : having attained a final or desired state mature wine
c : having achieved a low but stable growth rate paper is a mature industry
d : of, relating to, or being an older adult : elderly airline discounts for mature travelers
3a : of or relating to a condition of full development a man of mature years
b : characteristic of or suitable to a mature individual mature outlook a show with mature content
4 : due for payment a mature loan
5 : belonging to the middle portion of a cycle of erosion a mature stream

mature

verb
matured; maturing

Definition of mature (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to bring to maturity or completion

intransitive verb

1 : to become fully developed or ripe
2 : to become due

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Other Words from mature

Adjective

maturely adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for mature

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of mature in a Sentence

Adjective She's very mature for her age. He has a mature outlook on life. His parents didn't think he was mature enough to live on his own. Their bodies were mature, but they still behaved like children. After mature reflection, he concluded that he had been mistaken. Verb Girls mature earlier than boys both physically and mentally. Her talent is maturing slowly. Wine and cheese mature with age. The bond matures in 10 years.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The agency also intends to make additional, smaller awards this year for less mature ideas, Finan says. Adrian Cho, Science | AAAS, "Department of Energy picks two advanced nuclear reactors for demonstration projects," 16 Oct. 2020 That area included 95 acres of mature forest and 52 acres of herbaceous meadows, according to the agreement. Corinne Ramey, WSJ, "Trump Organization Considers Sale of Its Seven Springs Property," 15 Oct. 2020 Losses among large corals are especially concerning, because reefs rely on these big, mature corals to produce vast numbers of offspring that help perpetuate or revive surrounding reefs. Alex Fox, Smithsonian Magazine, "Climate Change Has Killed Half of the Great Barrier Reef’s Corals," 15 Oct. 2020 In other planters, mature plants are seeing out the season in robust vigor. Adrian Higgins, Washington Post, "The small city farm: An oasis in food deserts, during the pandemic and beyond," 14 Oct. 2020 For asset managers launching new products into an already-mature $4.7 trillion industry, low fees are one of the few ways to compete with legacy firms like BlackRock and Vanguard, which currently control 66% of U.S. ETFs. Claire Ballentine, Bloomberg.com, "Big New ETF Players May Be Ready to Bring Back the Price Wars," 10 Oct. 2020 Following a year or two of water conditions unfavorable for larval and juvenile oysters, there simply weren’t enough mature oysters out there to justify it, officials said. al, "Alabama to open oyster harvest Monday, hoping to build on 2019 rebound," 7 Oct. 2020 The clams were slow to return because the dredging had left behind bottom sediments so soft that mature clams would sink and suffocate. Mark Schleifstein, NOLA.com, "MR-GO closure improving environment, but more wetlands, swamp restoration needed: report," 3 Oct. 2020 The damage goes beyond the decimation of biodiversity to the habitat itself; lionfish victims include baby parrotfish, whose mature counterparts would otherwise feed on the algae that, unchecked, can smother coral reefs. Ligaya Mishan, New York Times, "When Invasive Species Become the Meal," 2 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Most early blooms do not set fruit, and the few that do seldom mature into good nectarines. Tom Maccubbin, orlandosentinel.com, "Early fall blooming is normal for nectarine trees," 17 Oct. 2020 Sharks grow relatively slowly, take many years to mature and produce relatively few young. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, "How the Coronavirus Vaccine Could Kill Half a Million Sharks," 13 Oct. 2020 His company is teaming with Houston engineering firm KBR to evaluate three types of rocket landing areas: rugged sites with no infrastructure, remote sites with limited support and mature sites that have established capabilities. Brandon Lingle, ExpressNews.com, "San Antonio company working with military, SpaceX to move cargo anywhere in world in an hour or less," 10 Oct. 2020 Getting to see the players grow, mature, take chances and learn is an amazing privilege. Joe Heim, Washington Post, "Pandemic teaching, in their words," 6 Oct. 2020 Everyone wants to win, and everyone wants to help these young men mature and reach their potential. Joseph Halm, NOLA.com, "Eric Chuter: 'Be where your feet are'," 30 Sep. 2020 In recent years, investors have sunk billions into hundreds of venture funds and thousands of projects and startups that can take years to mature, and are not easy to exit. Olga Kharif, Bloomberg.com, "Vulture Investor Feasts on Crypto Whales Seeking Quick Exits," 27 Sep. 2020 Among a slew of helpful functions, T cells help young B cells mature into antibody-making machines. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian Magazine, "Why Immunity to the Novel Coronavirus Is So Complicated," 26 May 2020 The politically damaging revelations about Trump’s tax avoidance, however, are perhaps less concerning than word the president is holding hundreds of millions of dollars of soon-to-mature debt, ethics experts said. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Ethics experts see national security concern in Trump’s debt," 29 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mature.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mature

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for mature

Adjective and Verb

Middle English, from Latin maturus ripe; akin to Latin mane in the morning, manus good

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Time Traveler for mature

Time Traveler

The first known use of mature was in the 15th century

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Statistics for mature

Last Updated

22 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Mature.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mature. Accessed 29 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for mature

mature

adjective
How to pronounce mature (audio) How to pronounce mature (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mature

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: having or showing the mental and emotional qualities of an adult
: having a fully grown or developed body : grown to full size
: having reached a final or desired state

mature

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mature (Entry 2 of 2)

: to become fully developed in the body and mind
: to continue developing to a desired level
finance : to become due for payment

mature

adjective
ma·​ture | \ mə-ˈtu̇r How to pronounce mature (audio) , -ˈtyu̇r, -ˈchu̇r \
maturer; maturest

Kids Definition of mature

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : fully grown or developed : adult, ripe mature fruit mature fish
2 : having or showing the qualities of an adult person a mature outlook
3 : due for payment a mature loan

mature

verb
matured; maturing

Kids Definition of mature (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to reach full development
2 : to become due for payment The bond matures in ten years.

mature

adjective
ma·​ture | \ mə-ˈt(y)u̇(ə)r also -ˈchu̇(ə)r \
maturer; maturest

Medical Definition of mature

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having completed natural growth and development a mature ovary
2 : having undergone maturation mature germ cells

mature

verb
matured; maturing

Medical Definition of mature (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to bring to maturity or completion

intransitive verb

: to become fully developed or ripe

Other Words from mature

maturer noun

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mature

verb
ma·​ture | \ mə-ˈtu̇r, -ˈchu̇r \
matured; maturing

Legal Definition of mature

transitive verb

: to bring to maturity a policy matured by the death of the insured

intransitive verb

: to become due, payable, or enforceable specifically : to entitle one to immediate enjoyment of benefits her pension right matured upon retirement — compare vest

Other Words from mature

mature adjective

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Comments on mature

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